SeproTec achieves a triple quality certificate for translations of medical devices

agosto 31st, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

SeproTec Multilingual Solutions has made another breakthrough in its medical translation services, becoming one of the few agencies on the market to receive ISO 13485, ISO 17100 and ISO 9001 certifications.

As a company that provides high-quality multilingual services, at SeproTec we highlight the importance of certifications with different ISO standards, such as 15485, 17100 and 9001. These are essential to validate the translation of medical, scientific and technical content that we offer, showing that they conform to the most rigorous and recognized standards that exist. Below, we explain in detail of what these certifications consist, as well as what each standard includes and what it contributes, both to us and to our clients.

SeproTec achieves a triple quality certificate for translations of medical devices

What does it mean to have these certifications? 

SGS, a world leader in inspection, verification, testing and certification, has awarded SeproTec Multilingual Solutions ISO 13485 certification for its translation services in the field of medical devices.  Health sciences is one of the sectors in which SeproTec is most specialized. We carry out translations of medical content with the highest level of precision, fully aware that errors cannot be tolerated. Lives are at stake.

Having these validations is a guarantee that our work meets the highest standards imposed by the Quality Management System.  This includes the ISO standards that must be met for a maximum service guarantee. In our case, we comply with three of these standards in terms of quality, and one in terms of the environment, ensuring, in each of our projects, the highest level of dedication, effort, precision, responsibility and safety.

ISO 13485 standard for medical devices

The standard ISO 13485 is a quality management system used by manufacturers, importers and distributors of medical devices. A medical device is any instrument, apparatus, device, machine, equipment, reagent for in-vitro use, computer program, material, or other similar or related article, which is intended by the manufacturer to be used on people for a health-related purpose.

It is a standard that is aimed not just at manufacturers of medical devices, but also at the suppliers with whom they interact throughout the medical device’s life-cycle.  Translation becomes associated with the medical device as soon as it is exported to other countries, with the need arising to translate its labeling, user instructions, and other marketing materials, to give just a few examples.

This ISO 13485 standard effectively embraces the quality processes that must be followed with clients from the medical and diagnostic device industries, as well as the hospital and dental clinic supply industry. It is a system guaranteed by the rigors of an independent external audit, and it focuses on issues of great importance such as safety and excellence. Both of these issues are of particular relevance in the medicine industry.

ISO 17100 and 9001 Standards

These two standards are even more important in translation services. The first one, ISO 17100, specific to the translation sector, lists what requirements for each issue must be met as regards the minimum qualification for translators, management of central processes, availability of resources, data protection and confidentiality.

For its part, the ISO 9001 standard ensures a good relationship between supplier and client through a universal language, as well as the ability to provide a service. We always meet both external and internal requirements within our organization, in addition to following cycles of continuous improvement and respecting other labor issues.

These are all advantages for clients

The benefits of working with an ISO 13485 certified language provider include easy integration of supplier and client quality systems, cost reduction and risk minimization in client audits, and the ability to shorten the qualification processes, significantly reducing the allocation of resources and overhead for monitoring suppliers.

 

Obtaining this latest ISO certification confirms SeproTec’s commitment to the most rigorous and recognized QMS standards applied in the health sciences industry.  Over the years, SeproTec has worked with many leading health sciences organizations, including pharmaceutical companies, biotech companies, medical device manufacturers and CROs, and we currently have 110 active clients in the sector, while in 2020 we translated more than 109 million words for the industry, our best endorsement.

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: June 2021

agosto 4th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Chatting with... | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

Jacek Szoblik is a ‘must translator’ when we deal with a technical translation into Polish, a cat lover and the winner of our June edition of the Translation of the Month  action.

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

 

Dzień dobry, Jacek.

You are one of our most regular and trusted technical translators. How did you become interested in this specific field of the industry? Name 3 skills you think are needed to be a good technical translator.

Honestly, it was sort of necessary for me to get interested in this field. I worked at SeproTec Kraków as a reviewer so I had to learn quick to be able to get my job done. When it comes to the 3 skills… These are not really skills but let me answer this way: I think you need a great technical dictionary around at all times. Then, you need to be extra observant when you work to get into this technical texts’ vibe and patterns. When you’re good with the above two, you need to practice and get experience. Then you should be fine!

What are the most common translation problems in Polish, your mother tongue?

I’d say that for me it’s that sentences in Polish can get really long. Sometimes you need to build really elaborate phrases to communicate something that was really concise in English. I wouldn’t call that a flaw in general, though!

Sometimes you enjoy running away to the countryside or woods… That’s so necessary! Do you usually take your work with you or prefer to leave it at home?

Absolutely not! It happens way too sporadically to disrupt my free time with a PC or particularly with work! Probably I shouldn’t even take my phone with me.

We are in love with your cat! It is good to be able to spend time with your pets while working. Can you think of any other benefits you get from being a freelancer?

Well, it’s nice to have some more freedom during the day which obviously isn’t possible when working full-time. On the other hand, sometimes you need to sacrifice your weekend… I’m still wondering which work model is better!

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

Leave your home as often as possible! Work from different locations, move, don’t settle in one place. It may sound like wasting time for moving around but for me it’s refreshing and makes me interact with people.

 

Thanks so much Jacek for your time and good work. We really enjoy working with you! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie.

 

 

 

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When a professional translation is ordered for a website or other medium that has been designed for a specific language, it is typical for problems to arise when fitting the new text into the allotted space. In each language a different number of words may be needed to express the same idea. That is why ideas that we want to convey in French or Arabic usually take up more space than in English or Chinese.

Expansion and contraction of texts

This effect is known to translation professionals, and is called expansion or contraction depending on whether more or less space is taken up. For example, when translating a text from English into French, we know that the translation will expand by about 15% compared to its original version.

Although it is very hard for the translation and the original to end up with exactly the same number of words, the effect can be more noticeable depending on the language of the target readers. Generally speaking, Romance languages use more words and Germanic languages use fewer to convey the same concept.

How do contraction and expansion affect design?

Currently, we live in a highly visual world, in which the text on websites, social media, catalogs and brochures are designed to create a sensation and capture people’s attention within seconds. As result, when we have a very noticeable expansion or contraction phenomenon, the end-product may lose its efficacy and adjustments may be needed to conserve the original emotional impact.

At SeproTec we work with localization experts who help our clients to achieve a balance between translation and design. Their work ensures that the original communication goal is preserved, but they may use more appropriate cultural formulas, considering not only the concepts, but also the feelings they engender or the use of a vocabulary that is more familiar to the target readers.

Thanks to their work we are able to guarantee that the product that the end-client receives is true to the original, not just in terms of content, but also intent and appearance. A very graphic example of this are translations into Arabic: images and text boxes are ordered inversely so that they make sense in relation to the direction in which the text is read.

Other factors to bear in mind

In addition to the unpredictability of the amount of characters in a translation, additional factors, such as compound nouns or character width complicate the management and layout of the text.

Languages like Finnish, Dutch and German represent what in other languages would be a sequence of smaller words as a single long word.

For example, the Spanish phrase “Seguro de Responsabilidad civil de automóviles” becomes “Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung” in German. Although in Spanish that phrase can be adjusted to fit two lines, in German it cannot be automatically adjusted, which can present a layout challenge.

Regarding character width, for example, “plans” in English becomes “しょくぶつ” in Japanese, occupying much more horizontal space.

How does the work done by localizers affect prices?

Most of the language combinations are priced based on word count in the source text (the original text).  Nevertheless, there are times when pricing is based on the word count in the target language.  Since the variation in word count for a given translation cannot be known beforehand, generally conversion ratios are used depending on the project languages. These are established based on the average increase or decrease of the terms.

The final cost of a project will also depend on other factors, such as the subject and the modifications made by the localizer or layout team.  These are usually estimated in work hours. Nevertheless, it will always be faster and more economic to use our specialists than to hire a separate graphic designer for each language to which a document needs to be translated. Our in-house layout teams ensure that your designs are appropriately adapted, taking expansion and contraction into account.

In conclusion, we can say without a doubt that a good professional translation service will always give clients the results they’re looking for. It isn’t just about quality texts, but also good adaptations of the end-product.

 

 

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: May 2021

julio 7th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We announce the May winner of our Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

On this occasion we would like you to meet Julio Amago a well-known translator of this house for the last 15 years and we invite you to read a brief interview with him.

 SeproTec Translator of the Month_May 2021

You have been working with us 15 years now! That is a lot, you are such a veteran. What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

I’m not sure how I feel about being called a veteran. Sometimes it seems like I’m still just starting out, and I keep studying and learning every day—about translation, about running a business and about my different subject matters.

What I enjoy the most about working with SeproTec is the varied nature of the jobs I get through the agency.

You work with many different languages: Catalan, English, French, Portuguese and Spanish. That is impressive! Is there any language you can’t handle?

There are many languages I can’t handle. To start with, all those languages you mentioned are concentrated around Southern Europe, and that’s only a small corner of our big world.

I lived in South Korea for two years as an English teacher and I really wanted to learn the language, but it proved to be extremely difficult. There were no courses for foreigners in the small city I was living in, so I studied with some books I bought and was always taking notes in a little notebook I carried everywhere. I tried really hard and I could get along with basic needs and conversation, but nothing like the way I can communicate in French and Portuguese, for example, which share so much with Spanish and even English.

This was twenty years ago now, so although I still remember the basics and many of the names of the terrific Korean dishes I have lost most of the vocabulary and grammar that I learned with so much effort.

You were an English teacher before working as a translator. That is awesome! When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation?

While travelling you always find yourself translating, trying to decode a menu or to find your way in an underground system, and that got me thinking about what it would be like to do it professionally. When I got back to Spain after my time in Korea, while I was working as a teacher of business English, I found a job offer in a company specialising in pharmaceutical and patent translation and I thought that with my background in biology that would suit me just fine. They loved the test I did for them and that’s how I got started as a full-time translator. The switch to freelancing came later.

Although you specialise in medical translation, as a multifaceted translator yourself, you might have other fields of interest. Is there any other field you enjoy working with?

I enjoy many fields, especially those that are technical and science-related, and I would love to work with extreme sports since I enjoy rock climbing and paragliding in my spare time, but I haven’t yet looked into doing it professionally.

You are also passionate about traveling! Is working remotely while traveling easy? What is your next destination?

I always work remotely, even when I’m at home, so that’s not really the challenge. The challenge depends on your destination and mode of travel, since you are totally dependent on the internet for work. So it’s easy if you just rent a nice Airbnb with a super-fast connection for a weekend or longer, but it’s nearly impossible if you are roughing it.

I was travelling overland in Mexico a few years back and at times I had to reject jobs or ask not to be sent jobs with urgent deadlines if I was moving between different places, because I could not guarantee whether I would have a good connection or not until I got to my destination. I remember one time when there were problems with the connection and I was late with a job with an important deadline. Both the PM and I were tearing our hair out! That was very stressful so I try to be more careful now about translating on the road. It’s also nice to take a break every now and then!

I’m not sure about what my next destination will be. I would like to start by going back to the UK after almost 8 years away from Europe, but for now I’ll just keep enjoying the little corner of the Pyrenees that I’ve been calling home for the last 10 months.

 

Thank you so much, Julio.  Have a great summer ahead!

 

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City of San Antonio Interpreting Services

junio 28th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interpretación | Interpreting - (Comentarios desactivados)

SeproTec is, since 2017, the interpreting service provider of the City of San Antonio, Texas. It is critical to get to know a little bit more about the city in order to understand the importance and need of language services.

San Antonio is part of the Bexar County and is located in the South Texas region. It is also one of the top 10 largest cities in the USA. A wealth of history and culture are integral parts of this city where the Alamo is located, which is famously known by the battle for Texan independence from Mexico in 1836. Additionally, this is city is proud of housing 4 military bases: Randolph AFB, Lackland AFB, Fort Sam Houston, and Camp Bullis. The Alamo City is a hub of patriotism, culture and diversity.

City of San Antonio Interpreting Services

City of San Antonio Interpreting Services

This city’s demographics are Hispanic (64.2%), White (24.7%), Blacks and African Americans (6.4%), but also count with American Indians and Alaska natives as well as Asians. It is estimated that out of 1.5 million inhabitants, 42% does not speak English as first language in the households. In addition, San Antonio is a tourist destination inside and outside the United States. Consequently, the government bodies of the city need all the content to be made accessible to this part of the population. Furthermore, the federally funded programs need to be made accessible as well based on the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act.

SeproTec Multilingual Solutions has been helping the City of San Antonio to close the gap between the government and the people of Limited English Proficiency for some time now and once again has been recently awarded with the interpreting services contract. Currently, SeproTec is servicing the City’s different departments: Government and Public Affairs, Development Services Department, Housing Commission, …

This type of interpreting is what we call community interpreting, or in other words; the interpreting services provided to communities with a substantial number of people with Limited English Proficiency. Currently, SeproTec is bridging the gap of communication during the City Council and other important meetings for the aforementioned departments resulting in an improved reach and engagement from these communities.

As these programs evolve, SeproTec Multilingual Solutions will continue servicing and developing roots with the local governments and communities. As firm believers of language accessibility, we promote a more inclusive society in which the language barrier does not limit the people understanding and interaction with their local, state and federal governments. We thank the City of San Antonio for placing its trust and confidence in SeproTec Multilingual Solutions.

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According to the UN, over 280 million people 3.6% of the global population lives outside their country of origin, both legally and irregularly, and there are 26 million refugees.

The role of linguistic-cultural mediators, also known as intercultural mediators , is essential when it comes to welcoming migrants who come to a country after fleeing critical situations. When we travel abroad, we not only encounter a language barrier, but a cultural barrier as well. And these difficulties are accentuated when people are traveling out of a need for asylum and refuge, that is, people who are persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, social group or political opinion, often in conflict contexts.

The role of cultural mediators in the asylum and refugee processes for migrants

 

The role of cultural mediators

Interpreters and cultural mediators are professionals with different abilities. Not all interpreters can perform cultural mediation, and not all cultural mediators have professional interpreting skills.  A cultural mediator is a person who facilitates mutual understanding between, for example, a person or a group of people who are migrants or applicants for refuge and asylum and the professional from the receiving country who is offering them assistance (a doctor, for example, a border official, the police, or a psychologist or social worker), interpreting and taking into account cultural elements. The cultural mediator facilitates the reception and integration phases of migrants and can advise both parties on appropriate cultural behaviors.

To better understand the figure of the cultural mediator, it is important to put yourself in the shoes of immigrants. Most of them arrive fleeing an extreme situation following a path that, on many occasions, involves equally harsh and traumatic conditions. This means that people arrive in poor physical and mental condition, making it necessary for the help of essential services to be sought.

Doctors, psychologists and social services alike need the trust of the migrant for their work to be carried out successfully. Cultural mediation helps these people, who have been victims of torture and abuse, to feel welcomed and understood at such a remove from their place of origin.

At SeproTec we provide cultural mediation services in different countries and in very different situations as we work with different NGOs, at points of arrival in ports, refugee camps, centers for unaccompanied minors, hospitals and health centers, and we also provide assistance in medical and paramedical services, health promotion, psychological services and legal advice. Although this is not always the case due to the circumstances surrounding each arrival point and the volume of migratory flows, normally, the cultural mediator is of the same nationality as the asylum seeker, someone who speaks to them in their language, who is familiar with their culture, and explains their rights and options to them at each stage of the process. They are also in charge of anticipating what is going to happen and, ultimately, of ensuring that the exchange of information is relevant and fruitful.

Beyond interpreting

Although the service we provide to refugees uses language as a vehicle, the work of mediators goes beyond mere interpreting. The aim is to facilitate integration through a better understanding between two cultures. For example, in a medical visit, doctors are advised on how to proceed with their examinations to avoid situations that would embarrass or disturb the patient.

Furthermore, if the mediator considers it important, they will not limit themselves just to the information offered by the migrant or professional and will instead offer an explanatory context regarding details and reasons. In other words, the work of a cultural mediator is oriented more towards integration than the simple transmission of information. The added value of this type of service lies more in the ability to overcome cultural barriers than in ensuring 100% correctness in the language.

Follow-up of each case

After each service process, it is important that a follow-up be performed on the asylum and refugee claimant by the professionals and the mediation facilitators. Once again, the job of the mediator is to contextualize the aid and the evolution, taking into account the specific situation and the customs of the place of origin.

In addition, while serving immigrants who are requesting asylum or refuge our help can also go one step further. If necessary, we help them fill out forms and we explain the meaning of the information we are giving them.

Our work as cultural mediators is one of the most rewarding applications within the translation and interpreting field, as it allows us to be of assistance in humanitarian emergencies. At all times we aim to act as a bridge for refugees, between the life they are starting, and the life they have left behind.

 

 

 

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: April 2021

mayo 24th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

Let us announce April’s winner of the 2021 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

We would like to introduce you to Marcin Szambelan, a highly appreciated translator at SeproTec.

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month_April 2021

Good morning Marcin,

You have been collaborating with SeproTec since 2016, that is a long time! What do you enjoy most about working with us?

Variety of projects, for sure. It’s a great feeling to know that you have a freedom of choice when it comes to selecting projects that match your interests or field of expertise. I also enjoy working with the Vendor Portal, as it facilitates the work tremendously.

You work with many different languages: Chinese, English and Polish. That’s impressive! What are the most common translation problems in Polish, your mother tongue?

Hmmm… that’s a hard one. I’ve been in the business almost a decade and during this time I’ve faced many issues, both as a translator and reviewer. If I were to name just one specific problem, it would be the fact that Polish language is characterized by a high degree of inflection. This has some implications on the final output.

You are a such a car fanatic! It probably explains why you specialise in the automotive field… How did you become interested in this particular field?

Funny story. One day my car broke in the middle of the road and it was towed to a local workshop which charged me a hefty price. On that day I decided to take matters into my own hands. I bought a set of tools and started studying manuals, technical documentation etc. Before this incident cars were like magic to me, now they are like a bigger version of Legos for bigger boys ;)

What is your biggest strength as a translator? And your biggest weakness?

I think accuracy and precision. And my biggest weakness? It’s hard for me to say no to new projects even if I’m working my socks off. I’m a workaholic!

What does your dream career as a translator look like?

I’m living my dream, to be honest. Every day brings new challenges and I’m more than willing to face them.

 

Thank you so much Marcin for taking the time to answer our questions.   It’s been a pleasure!

 

 

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: March 2021

mayo 4th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are pleased to announce the winner of our Translator of the Month action for March 2021!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Rebecca Bolton, who is one of our most regular marketing, business and legal translators.


 Good morning, Rebecca.

You are one of our most regular and trusted marketing, business and legal translators. How did you become interested in these specific fields of the industry?

I have always had an interest in marketing and business and have studied these in the past, so it was a natural fit to specialise in these. I have also previously worked in SEO so digital marketing is especially of interest. My interest in the legal field has developed through my translation work.

You translate from many source languages: Italian, French, Spanish and German, that’s impressive! Which one is in your opinion the most challenging? Why?

German is the most challenging for me due to the word order differences compared to English and the sometimes challenging vocabulary.

What do you think are the greatest challenges of the translation industry nowadays? What advice would you give to beginner translators?

I think the pandemic has certainly hit the translation industry over the past year, with the economic downturn and uncertainty among clients having a knock-on effect on the translation industry. I also think that keeping up to date with new technologies and changing needs from clients is a challenge for both agencies and translators, so adaptability is important.

I would advise beginner translators to accept work within their competence and that they feel comfortable with, since when starting out there is a tendency to want to say yes to everything. This would help build both their reputation and experience. I also think that it is important to work with agencies that offer work that you enjoy and that you have good working relationships with.

Do you have a fixed schedule for work, or do you usually finish your day when your work allows you?

I tend to work Monday to Friday during standard working hours but sometimes I do work evenings and weekends. It depends on the workload.

Do you have a life motto?

It’s actually a Spanish saying “quien la sigue la consigue”. To me it means if you want something and work towards it then you will get it.

 

Thank you so much, Rebecca! Working with you is a real pleasure.  Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie. :)

 

 

 

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Any translation process requires a review stage that guarantees optimal quality. This need is much more prominent, however, in the case of pharmaceutical or medical translation, due to some of the factors that come into play.

Medical translation: much more than translating

It is easy to understand that any activity related to the medical or health field requires special attention and care. This is field of vital importance: in it, a job well done can be a vital part of treating a patient and, on the flipside, a job poorly done could have fatal results. Translation within this field is no different.

Most medical texts go through a full translation process, since the results and advances of the numerous research initiatives around the world must be made available to all professionals on the planet. That is why we need specialized linguists who know first-hand how these texts work and the specificities of the different languages in which they will be working and who, in turn, have specific knowledge about the subject in question.

 

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

Quality translations for a crucial sector

As in any translation process, texts have to go through various stages in order to provide an optimal final result. Not all translation providers are created equal, but, assuming you have opted for an ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified corporate translation provider, you can expect your translation to be put together by at least three different people in the translation, editing and proofreading pipeline.

The quality control process, a whole, well-synchronized team

First, a specialized translator, selected for their experience as an expert in the field, with experience translating languages for native-speaker readers, will be in charge of reading the entire text, investigating any ambiguities, and transmitting all the information to the target language.

After that, a different linguist has to review the initial translation, correcting and improving any errors or slips that the translator may have left in. The proofreader adds further expertise in the subject matter and native language to the translation project, thus performing Linguistic Quality Assurance (LQA) to ensure that the translation is clear, correct, and concise.

After the translator and proofreader have completed their assignments and the translation has gone through Language Quality Assurance (LQA), the project usually goes to the layout team. Multilingual DTP experts eliminate any difficulties arising from expanding or retracting text, or character differences from the original language to the target language translation.

Lastly, a different proofreader will produce a final version. In the process of reviewing the general appearance, style and design of the project, it is also detected if something is missing or if there is an error, in which case the Project Manager (PM) is notified and forwards the text to the appropriate person to correct the problem.

When a document is submitted for translation, there is a whole team involved with the final product, which is thoroughly reviewed and researched before being finalized. Beyond the translator, reviewer, and proofreader, you have a project manager and may include a multilingual layout team working to deliver the final translation. Content can thus be analyzed more exhaustively, guaranteeing quality translations.The final quality of the text that we deliver to the client must be the highest possible, of course, due to the potential consequences that an error in this kind of text can cause. Take, for example, the case of a patient receiving an incorrect dose of a drug due to a failure to properly transcribe a medical package insert. Even more serious cases can occur, such as errors of meaning when transcribing the way to proceed during a surgical intervention, aggravating the patient’s symptoms.

For this reason, pharmaceutical and medical translation is one of the translation fields that requires the most attention. Health depends on a correct understanding and transfer of information between specialists into the most different languages, and each medical specialty has a plethora of highly specific terms. In these cases, it is essential that the translator have certain knowledge on the specific subject matter and be capable of resolving errors or technical problems. A good team of experienced linguists, such as that of SeproTec, will guarantee the highest quality in texts of this kind.

 

 

 

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: February 2021

marzo 22nd, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

Collaborates with SeproTec since 2013 with translations of all kinds of texts, although her specialization is the scientific field.  Holding a bachelor in chemist sciences, Angels Pons, works in Catalan, English and Spanish and has been chosen Translator of the Month in February 2021.

If you want to get to know Angels better, do not miss the short interview below.

Hello Angels, thank you for your time :)

Winner of SeproTec Translator of the Month

 

 

What do you start your workday with?

I start my workday looking briefly my mails and answering the new ones.

Science is your passion and you studied a Bachelor of Chemical Sciences, that is impressive! Do you consider Translation a way to put your passion to work?

With translation I can combine my passion for science and for languages. For me is a pleasure to make science and technique affordable in my own language.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

Working with SeproTec is fantastic, because they give me different kind of projects, so everyone is a new challenge. And the translator managers make easy to work with them. They are professional, kind, and helpful.

As an avid reader yourself, do you consider reading a training to continue to improve your translation skills?

Obviously, been an avid reader helps me in my work. I always like to learn new things, and the best way to learn is reading. To be a good and updated professional requires a continuous learning.

You are also passionate about traveling! Is working remotely while traveling easy? What’s your next destination?

Well, when I travel it is for leisure, and then I try not to work and focus in enjoying with my family and friends, but sometimes I must finish some projects and, depending on your destination, it is difficult to get a good internet connection.

This summer, if the sanitary conditions are good, I want to go to spend a week in Ibiza and, perhaps, some days in the Toscana. It is yet to be seen.

 

Thank you so much for your time, thank you for your excellent work and congratulations!

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