SeproTec Multilingual Solutions is now part of one of the most significant collaborative projects aimed at innovation, bringing the private, public and academic sports industries together.

Only a few months old, Global Sports Innovation Center is a project headed by Microsoft that seeks to revolutionize the sports industry through innovation and entrepreneurship. Its strategy revolves around four primary objectives:

-  To bring the most innovative companies together.

-  To promote the development of dynamic and collaborative projects.

-  To combine resources and talent.

-  To provide the most innovative technological tools in the industry.

In just a short time, Global Sports Innovation Center has already gained some very prestigious partners, including Real Madrid, LG, Cigna, MediaPro and Adidas, who, along with technology companies, several universities and the government of the Community of Madrid, are all working together to develop and implement transformational technological tools.

For SeproTec, this new partnership is part of its strategic plan in which innovation plays a crucial role as the basis for creating value for customers. Particularly noteworthy among SeproTec’s objectives is the establishment of an innovation committee, contributing disruptive solutions capable of evolving into global multilingual solutions that will ensure improved customer experience.

New consumer habits and the development of emerging countries has favored the rapid development of the sports industry, which has become one of the most global industries in the market. This accelerated international development requires effective multilingual solutions capable of bringing what has become a global phenomenon to Main Street.

Translation, interpreting and the localization of content will necessarily play a key strategic role in such a global context, ensuring the roll-out of products and services in different international markets.

SeproTec Multilingual Solutions ya forma parte de uno de los proyectos colaborativos más importantes en materia de innovación, que agrupa al sector privado, público y académico de la industria deportiva.

Con apenas unos meses de vida, Global Sports Innovation Center es un proyecto liderado por Microsoft que persigue revolucionar la industria del deporte desde la innovación y el emprendimiento. Su estrategia gira en torno a cuatro ejes principales:

-  Reunir a las empresas más innovadoras.

-  Fomentar el desarrollo de proyectos dinámicos y colaborativos.

-  Fusionar recursos y talento.

-  Presentar las herramientas tecnológicas más innovadoras del sector.

En muy poco tiempo, Global Sports Innovation Center ya cuenta con socios tan importantes como el Real Madrid, LG, Cigna, MediaPro o Adidas, que, junto a empresas tecnológicas, varias universidades y el apoyo de la Comunidad de Madrid, trabajan de forma colaborativa en el desarrollo y la implantación de herramientas tecnológicas transformadoras.

Para SeproTec, esta nueva incorporación forma parte de su plan estratégico en el que la innovación juega un papel protagonista como base de la creación de valor para el cliente. Entre sus objetivos, destaca la puesta en marcha de un comité de innovación que aporte soluciones disruptivas, capaces de evolucionar hacia soluciones multilingües globales que garanticen una mejor experiencia de cliente.

Los nuevos hábitos de los consumidores y el desarrollo de los países emergentes han favorecido un rápido desarrollo de la industria del deporte que, hoy por hoy, se ha convertido en una de las más globales del mercado. Este acelerado desarrollo internacional demanda soluciones multilingües eficaces, capaces de extender a escala local lo que ya se ha convertido en un fenómeno global.

En este contexto, la traducción, interpretación y localización de contenidos van a jugar, necesariamente, un papel estratégico clave que garantice la implantación de productos y servicios en los distintos mercados internacionales.

Lina is a Spanish woman. That is clear, among other things, from her place of birth: Cádiz. What I’m not entirely clear on after our conversation is where her heart lies, divided as it is between Spain, her country of birth, and Syria, her family’s home.

It is one o’clock in the afternoon and we are meeting with one of our Arabic interpreters. We want to understand the real situation faced by Syrian refugees and how the work of interpreters can help in an international conflict like this one. After a few minutes of chit-chat, Lina begins the interview with a devastating statement. “I’ve had the misfortune of experiencing first-hand the flight from Syria,” she says. “The stampede of my own family.” Lina, you see, though she was born in Spain, is the daughter of Syrians who have had to escape from their own home. Her father came to Spain very young, and in circumstances far removed from today’s, to study medicine. “He was surprised back then by Spain’s immense cultural and industrial backwardness,” she muses. The irony of life.

Lina has lived her whole life in Spain, but she has also spent long periods of time in Syria. “The last few summers that I was in Syria you practically couldn’t tell whether you were in Europe or a Middle Eastern country. Its ambiance, its restaurants and terraces, made you think you were in a modern country.” She spent those summers with her cousins, the same cousins who left the country without a return ticket some months ago. “My cousin was cooking and his wife was painting her nails when a bomb exploded a few meters from their house.” One anguished glance was all it took for them to realize that their life in Syria had just ended. “They had to flee with nothing but the clothes on their backs. They didn’t even have time to prepare a small suitcase.” I tell Lina that I cannot imagine how terrible it must be to leave everything you have behind, or the fear of fleeing into the unknown. Just a look at some of the chilling images we’ve all seen by now can give us an idea of what that must be like. “The worst part is not what they do to you, it’s what you see them do to your family,” she tells me in one of the most painful parts of the interview.

She recounts horrible stories of the moment that her family arrived at Bodrum, Turkey. “There my family experienced things that they will never be able to forget. Fights, insults, humiliations…” Everything changed, though, when they came to Germany. “The welcome the Germans have given us has been fantastic. Coming to Germany meant having hope again.” Now it is time to think about the future. Lina’s cousins are between 25 and 40 years old. “The ones with children see this as an opportunity for their families. They are all dreaming of a European future.” The hardest part, though, is listening to the elders. “Not a day goes by that my grandmother doesn’t ask when she will return home.”

Lina speaks of her profession with a gleam of pride in her eyes. “I think that we interpreters have a lot to offer in this terrible conflict.” Although she has been interpreting for many different clients for over five years now, she is especially fond of her work for the Spanish Asylum and Refugee Office. “I’ve experienced moments I’ll never forget while interpreting. The tears and hugs from compatriots who hear your voice for the first time. The look on the face of a child who hears your accent and is transported back to the warmth of his hometown.” A child who, incidentally, Lina would run into again some years later. “He must have been about 18 years old then and he leapt toward me to give me a hug. He spoke perfect Spanish and was in the company of a group of Spanish friends. His life and hope were already here with us.“

Lina studied Translation and Interpreting at the Complutense University of Madrid. “I knew that I wanted to study Translation and Interpreting when I was asked, through a contact at the Syrian embassy, to accompany a Syrian music band on an official visit to Granada where the King and Queen of Spain and Bashar al Assad were going to be present.” Lina had to interpret for the musicians who did not speak Spanish. “I loved the experience. I loved traveling, being surrounded by people and feeling helpful by using the language.” After studying Translation and Interpreting she traveled to Syria to study classical Arabic at the University of Damascus. “There I also did translation from French to classical Arabic, but my passion was still interpreting.” That’s why, not long after, Lina returned to Spain and began her career as an interpreter. “Feeling that you’re helping people, helping your own compatriots with something as human as communicating, makes you feel accomplished, both as a professional and as a person.”

Thank you so much, Lina, for this moving interview and allow us to wish you and yours all the best in this new stage of your lives.

Warmly,

The SeproTec team.

Lina es española. Lo dice, entre otras cosas, su lugar de nacimiento: Cádiz. Lo que no tengo tan claro después de nuestra conversación es lo que dirá su corazón, dividido entre España, su país natal, y Siria, el hogar de su familia.

Es la una de la tarde y hemos quedado con una de nuestras intérpretes de árabe. Queremos conocer la situación real de los refugiados sirios y ver cómo puede ayudar el trabajo de los intérpretes en un conflicto internacional como este. Después de unos minutos de conversación que nos llevan por otros derroteros, Lina empieza la entrevista con una frase demoledora: «He tenido la desgracia de vivir la huida de Siria –corrige–, la estampida de mi propia familia», y es que Lina, aunque nacida en España, es hija de sirios que han tenido que escapar de su propio hogar. Su padre, en circunstancias totalmente distintas a las actuales, llegó a España muy joven para estudiar medicina. «Le sorprendió el tremendo retraso cultural e industrial de la España de la época» Lo que son las cosas.

Lina ha vivido toda su vida en España, pero ha pasado largas temporadas en Siria. «Los últimos veranos que estuve en Siria prácticamente no sabías si estabas en Europa o en un país de Oriente Medio. Su ambiente, sus restaurantes y terrazas te hacían pensar que estabas en un país moderno». Pasaba los veranos con sus primos, los mismos que hace pocos meses salieron del país sin maleta de vuelta. «Mi primo estaba cocinando y su mujer pintándose las uñas cuando una bomba estalló a pocos metros de su casa». Solo hizo falta una triste mirada para saber que su vida en Siria había terminado. «Tuvieron que huir con lo puesto. No les dio tiempo de hacer ni una sencilla maleta». Le digo a Lina que no soy capaz de hacerme una idea de lo terrible que tiene que ser dejar atrás todo lo que tienes, y el terror de una huida sin certezas. Solo al ver las escalofriantes imágenes que todos conocemos podemos hacernos una idea de ello. «Lo peor no es lo que te hacen a ti, es lo que estás viendo que le hacen a tu familia», me contesta en uno de los momentos más duros de la entrevista.

Lina, en Siria, rodeada de sus primos.

Nos cuenta episodios terribles del momento en el que su familia llegó a Bodrum, Turquía. «Allí, mi familia ha vivido experiencias que nunca conseguirán olvidar. Peleas, insultos, vejaciones…». Sin embargo, todo cambió cuando llegaron a Alemania. «La acogida de los alemanes ha sido maravillosa. Llegar a Alemania significaba albergar nuevas esperanzas». Ahora es momento de pensar en el futuro. Los primos de Lina tienen entre 25 y 40 años. «Los que tienen hijos ven esto como una oportunidad para sus familias. Todos sueñan con un futuro europeo». Sin embargo, la parte más dura es la de escuchar a los mayores. «Mi abuela no se acuesta un día sin preguntar cuándo va a volver a su casa».

Lina con sus primos y sobrinos.

Lina te habla de su profesión con una expresión de orgullo en su mirada: «creo que los intérpretes tenemos mucho que aportar en este terrible conflicto». Aunque lleva más de 5 años interpretando para distintos clientes, siente un cariño especial por su trabajo en la Oficina de Asilo y Refugio. «Interpretando he vivido momentos que nunca voy a olvidar. Las lágrimas y abrazos de los compatriotas que escuchan tu voz por primera vez. La mirada de un niño al que tu acento le transporta al calor de su pueblo». Un niño, dicho sea de paso, al que Lina se encontró años después: «Debía de tener ya unos 18 años y se lanzó sobre mí para darme un abrazo. Hablaba un español perfecto y estaba acompañado de un grupo de amigos españoles. Su vida y su ilusión ya estaban con nosotros».

Uno de los momentos de la entrevista

Lina estudió Traducción e Interpretación en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. «Supe que quería estudiar Traducción e Interpretación cuando, a través de un contacto en la embajada de Siria en España, me llamaron para acompañar a un grupo de música sirio en un viaje oficial a Granada en el que participaban los reyes de España y Bashar al Assad». Lina tenía que hacer de intérprete para los componentes del grupo que no hablaban español. «Me encantó la experiencia. Me gustaba el hecho de viajar, estar rodeada de gente y sentirme útil utilizando el idioma». Después de estudiar Traducción e Interpretación, viajó a Siria para estudiar árabe clásico en la Universidad de Damasco. «Allí también hice traducción del francés al árabe clásico, pero mi vocación seguía siendo la interpretación». Por eso, poco tiempo después, Lina volvió a España donde comenzó su carrera como intérprete. «Sentir que ayudas a la gente, a tus propios compatriotas en algo tan humano como es la comunicación, te hace sentir realizada, profesional y personalmente».

Muchas gracias, Lina, por esta entrañable entrevista y, desde SeproTec, os deseamos mucha suerte en esta nueva etapa.

Con todo nuestro cariño,

El equipo de SeproTec.