Author Archives: admin

About admin

Este es el blog corporativo de SeproTec, una compañía que ha desarrollado una amplia gama de servicios multilingües que ayudan a las empresas e instituciones globales a implantar sus objetivos nacionales e internacionales, sin tener que preocuparse por los problemas del idioma. Desde la traducción de cualquier documentación técnica, a la interpretación en todas sus modalidades, interpretación telefónica o formación. Si deseas saber más sobre SeproTec, puedes dirigirte a su Web www.seprotec.com, o si prefieres conocer al Grupo Sepro al que pertenece SeproTec puedes dirigirte a http://www.gruposepro.com/ http://maps.google.es/maps/place?cid=1982362385721946599&q=Seprotec&hl=es&sll=40.396764,-3.713379&sspn=11.875058,33.178711&ie=UTF8&ll=46.073231,-20.302734&spn=0,0&z=6

SeproTec Translator of the Month: March 2019

abril 5th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are excited to announce the winner of the March 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Alexandra Gabriela Calciu, one of our most trusted sworn translators. As you may see on the picture, Alexandra likes SeproTec as much as we SeproTec like her! :)

What do you start your workday with?

I’ll tell you how a busy day begins. When I have a lot of work, I usually get up at 5 or 6 in the morning. Just as there are people who do better at night, I have come to the conclusion that my brain works much better at dawn. That’s why I prefer to get up very early. Therefore, I get up, I prepare a good breakfast and a big cup of coffee, and I can start my work day, of course, always with optimism. I usually get to work immediately after breakfast, so as not to lose a minute of performance of my brain, since at that time it is at its best. I always finish my day getting my list of priorities ready for the next day. In this way, when I start the day, everything is ready and I know exactly where to start. I think that good organization is the key to success.

Why did you choose translation as a career?

Since I was little, I wasn’t very good at math and languages were my strength. Before I started studying them at school, I already had a good “background” regarding languages. Without much effort, I got to speak French and Spanish and stand out in my class. That is why I continued my journey through the great adventure of the language sector. I must admit it has not been easy, but it was worth it!

If you hadn’t become a translator, what do you think you would have done?

It’s a very good question… I think it has always been very clear to me that I wanted to do this, so I never thought about having another job. Naturally, I had to do other jobs until I became a translator, and each and every one of them has been related to customer service. Consequently, it is likely that, if I had not become a translator, I would be working in ​​human resources or customer service. It is a very difficult sector, since I think there is no more complicated work than customer service. However, due to my infinite patience, every day would be a new challenge and it would be a very entertaining task.

You are the first sworn translator we interview. What are, in your opinion, the biggest challenges sworn translators face on a daily basis?

I must admit it is a great honour to be chosen Translator of the Month, and it is even more so because I am the first sworn translator to be awarded. Sworn translators, apart from having the ENORMOUS responsibility of translating official documents (with everything this entails), face many daily challenges. One of them is acting as an advisor. Most of my clients ask me for advice on legal procedures, so many times I face the difficult situation of having the responsibility of advising and guiding the client regarding the procedures that must be followed.

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?

I couldn’t have said it better myself. We are always “behind the scenes” and people often don’t understand how difficult this job is and the responsibility we must assume when writing some words on a piece of paper. Many clients say “I could also do the translation myself, but…” ☹ It is a sentence I have heard many times and that makes me think many people don’t value this job. Fortunately, there is an even bigger number of people who do value this profession and know that we, translators (whether sworn or not), have an extremely important role and that not any bilingual person can perform such tasks.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

I have come a long way to get to work as Sworn Translator-Interpreter in Spain. When I started my “adventure” in the field of translation in Spain, I didn’t know how the sector worked. I started by contacting several companies, among which, of course, was SeproTec. I must admit that they have accepted me and made me feel a part of their GREAT FAMILY. Even during the first months of collaboration with SeproTec, I had the feeling that I had worked with them for a lifetime. Apart from the punctuality in payments and the quick solution of small problems that may arise along the projects, what I like the most about the collaboration I have with SeproTec is the human touch offered by the PMs, who are always polite, fast and reliable.

 

Thank you, Alexandra! It’s fantastic to have you among our Team of Translators! Happy Friday and enjoy your SeproTec hoodie :)

Challenges of intercultural communication

abril 2nd, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | International | Localización | Marketing | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

Globalization gives you the opportunity to expand your business into other countries and to find and explore new markets in which to sell your products or services. Yet the overall global context does not mean that countries are giving up their cultural roots. When taking your brand into a country you don’t know, transcreation is the way to go. Transcreation means being aware of intercultural differences and analyzing them so as to adapt your communication to a different culture.

‘Transcreation goes beyond creative translation,’ says transcreation expert from Transcreat, agency with which SeproTec workd on a regular basis,

‘ You should forget old translation concepts of fidelity and transparency. Transcreation is about recreation. You should read an original and then forget its wording but keep in mind its meaning. When you have forgotten how this meaning was described in the original, you will be able to recreate it into another language based on the context, culture and idiosyncrasies of the people who are going to read your work.’

Expand your communication possibilities 

When you want to move your business to other countries, you find yourself having to make a huge marketing effort to achieve the desired levels of success. Globalization provides you with a world of business opportunities, but the fact that the world has never been more connected doesn’t mean the end of cultural and communication barriers between cultures.


What must you do to establish your business in a new country?

It has been shown that consumers are put off by poorly translated websites and tend not to trust them. This occurs with sites with text that is full of spelling mistakes, poorly translated or simply poorly written. This is not the only important aspect, though.

Have your website well translated and adapt it to your target market if you want to be successful

If you really want to expand your brand and increase your sales in a new country, having your website well translated is not enough.

- Adapt all your messages, your communication style and your campaigns to adjust them not only to a new language, but also to a new culture.

- Recruit native staff to ensure that your strategies are best suited to the values and characteristics that define your new audience.

A new communication structure

All too often, when we talk about starting to sell in another country, the first and only thing that comes to mind is translating our website, but this is by no means the only thing you are going to have to adapt.

- New country is synonymous with new bureaucracy and with building relationships with suppliers and distributors based there.

- If you have to change currencies, the best thing to do is review your entire pricing policy. Every culture has its own way of understanding prices and this is no trivial matter. Get in contact with experts if you feel unsure.

- Specific characteristics can also influence the design of your website, the colors used and even the type of people who appear in your visuals, videos and advertising spots.

Transcreation shows itself to be the most effective strategy. If you want to be successful, make sure you don’t focus all your effort just on a good translation, but also consider all the dimensions that influence your communications in the new country.
‘As the world we live in becomes more globalized, digital and diversified, and markets continue to broaden, new challenges arise,’ adds Arcelino Monteiro, one of our most trusted and experienced transcreation experts, ‘Never before has a service been in such high demand and as necessary and urgent as it is today: transcreation, a powerful globalization tool that takes into account heritage, local values, beliefs and cultures aspects to convey a message in a way that appeals to a different culture, reaching their hearts and minds and evoking emotions.’

According to Arcelino, main challenges when working on a transcreation project are:

• Puns;

• Idioms;

• Proverbs;

• Slogans;

and character limits (when they are applied).

SeproTec’s pioneering transcreation service involves translators, proofreaders, testers, creators and marketing and communication experts working together. This service is indispensable for reaching any market.

SeproTec Translator of the Month: February 2019

marzo 20th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Let us announce the second winner of the 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Alexander Lichanow, one of our most trusted German translators.

What do you start your work day with?

I get up on my own terms (no alarm clock!) since I have become quite an early bird in the past years. I brew up some coffee, feed our cats and then boot up my PC. Then I spend about half an hour listening to music and reading some news before actually getting to work. My focus is best in the morning, so I make sure to take my break by noon to restore some focus. I am working on large jobs more often than not but I always make sure to make space for “breakfast jobs”, as I am calling small jobs that take no more than an hour to complete. I handle those jobs as a “warm-up” for the large chunk of work coming up with my larger jobs.

Why did you choose translation as a career?

I always had a knack for languages, which was probably inspired by our move from Kazakhstan to Germany when I was 7 years old. As a child, I felt the urge to integrate myself into the surrounding culture so I made a point to learn German as quickly and proficiently as possible. Later, at secondary school (“Gymnasium” in Germany) I realized that my talents were definitely not with maths or sciences. When I was in 10th or 11th grade, the translators’ academy where I did my studies was presented at my school, so from this point on I knew for certain that I would go ahead to pursue a career as a translator.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

First and foremost: Don’t ever feel compelled to do badly paid work! Even if you are just starting out, your work still has its value, and if you are going to pay your bills by translating, low rates just won’t do the trick. Also, don’t bite off more than you can chew (sort of goes hand in hand with not accepting low rates). Sure, you CAN do those 10k words within a day, I have been there myself. But neither the quality of your translations nor your personal wellbeing should suffer from this. Find a viable volume for your everyday work and don’t deviate from it too regularly.

What are the most common translation problems in German, your mother tongue?

German tends to be pretty verbose, which is especially egregious when translating PowerPoints or other files with space restrictions. Software strings will have to be abbreviated or otherwise clipped more often than not. Also, most machines (see question 6 below) are completely overwhelmed with the three grammatical genders and case-based inflections, which makes editing machine translations – which are horrible to begin with in most cases – extremely tedious and frustrating.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

The PMs I have worked with so far are very friendly and understanding, I am getting a very constant flow of work (SeproTec IS my largest and most important customer after all), mostly without having to overstrain my capacity, and payments are always on time, which is not a matter of course in today’s translation business.

Human translation vs Machine Translation: what is your opinion?

100% human translation! First of all, I actually enjoy my job as a translator, not so much as an editor. I enjoy having the freedom to convey concepts, not just translate mere words. Also, while I absolutely recognize the future aim of machine translation for both translators and end-clients (faster turnaround for the client, less work per job for translators), commercial machines at their current state as of March 2019 are horrible. This makes editing those “masterpieces” at a reduced rate an extreme headache absolutely not worth the time and nerves spent/wasted/lost on this work. Mark my words: If Skynet ever takes over the world, I did nothing to contribute to it

Translating a tweet: the best way to do it

marzo 19th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Did you know...? | International | Marketing | Social media - (Comentarios desactivados)

One of the main characteristics of the social media platform Twitter is that it has a character limit for each of the messages you want to publish, the famous 280 characters.

You have to express whatever it is you are thinking in that precise moment or convey it in an understandable way within that limit. By the way, increasing the character limit in Twitter posts from 140 to 280 characters was, according to many experts, one of the most important changes in PR and marketing in 2018.

Longer tweets give you an opportunity to get more content.

Tweet translation

Because of the social media platform’s character restriction, translation is a real challenge in certain language combinations. For example, from Spanish to English it is usually not that complicated as it has a simple structure that usually takes up less space. On the other hand, a translation into German can be quite complicated as it has longer words.

How to translate with space limits

This is a question that pertains not only to social media, but also to subtitling. The best approach is to take a number of factors into account:

- The maximum number of characters in each message. This may seem obvious, but you must take this into account because otherwise the message might not be published.

- The linguistic characteristics of the target language. To continue with the last example, if you know that German usually takes up more space then you need to come up with different solutions to successfully convey the same message as in the original language. In this case we’re talking about adaptation.

- The essence of the message you wish to convey. If you want to translate a publication originally written in English into German, the best thing you can do is identify the main gist of the message. If you are clear on what you are trying to convey, you can create a translation that, while not saying it in the same way, does convey the same idea.

- The marketing structure of the target language. You need to see the social media platform Twitter as just another marketing tool among the many that exist. This complicates everything a bit because, while also successfully conserving the original message’s meaning in the translation without exceeding the medium’s character limit, you must also choose the right terms to sell the product being marketed.

- Who is the intended recipient. In addition to all of the aforesaid, you must always be aware of who the intended recipient of the message is. This way you can adapt the tone and the terms used in the translation to catch their attention.

The limited number of characters we can use on Twitter may seem like a limitation, however a short message format allows you to share information very quickly. This is what distinguishes Twitter. Twitter users respond quickly to emerging information, and therefore, you cannot allow yourself to be out of date or to publish content that is not adapted to your audience.

These are some tips for achieving the most accurate translation possible. The best thing you can do, however, is to leave it to the professionals and steer well clear of machine translations or word-for-word translation. At SeproTec we have extensive experience with marketing translations. We know that it is not enough for messages to be understood – they also have to connect, as while targeting a given market we must adapt the communication strategy to the culture and customs of the target audience. That is why our team is backed by professional translators with expertise in different marketing disciplines.

By the way: are you following us on Twitter?

 

SeproTec at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting!

marzo 14th, 2019 | Posted by admin in conferences | events | Life Sciences | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

Sharing views and expertise with industry leaders, meeting 6,000+ life sciences professionals, networking… This is what awaits SeproTec Team at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting in San Diego, June 23-27. We will be exhibiting at booth #621.

This meeting is a must-attend for all life science professionals around the globe. Stay tuned for more info!

 

SeproTec: #24 on Slator 2019 LSP Index

febrero 27th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Localización | Rankings | SeproTec | Sin categoría | Slator | ¿Sabías qué...? - (Comentarios desactivados)

Slator released the Slator 2019 Language Service Provider Index featuring the world’s largest translation, localization, interpretation, subtitling and dubbing companies.

We have a pleasure to inform you that SeproTec is ranked #24 in Slator’s Language Service Provider Index for 2019!

SeproTec ranked 24 on Slator 2019 LSPI

2018 was a positive year overall, with strong double-digit growth for many of the leading 40 or so players, states Slator.

We are celebrating being within the Leaders Group!

We would like to say Thank you! to the whole SeproTec team: our employees, translators and interpreters for all their efforts and hard work.

 

SeproTec celebrating International Mother Language Day 2019!

febrero 21st, 2019 | Posted by admin in International | SeproTec | Translators | ¿Sabías qué...? - (Comentarios desactivados)
On February 21st we are celebrating International Mother Language Day!
It was approved at the 1999 UNESCO General Conference and has been observed throughout the world since 2000. ‘Since 2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages, the theme of this year’s International Mother Language Day will be indigenous languages as a factor in development, peace and reconciliation.’, UNESCO states.
At SeproTec offices there are several dozen languages spoken and our Team’s diveristy is what we love the most!

SeproTec Translator of the Month: January 2019

febrero 19th, 2019 | Posted by admin in SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Let us announce the first winner of the 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Cristina Munari, one of our most trusted patent translators, living in Trieste.

What do you start your work day with?

My profession gives me the freedom to organize my day with flexibility. After breakfast, I check and respond to e-mails and I spend a couple of hours in front of the PC. Then I go out for a walk in the beautiful town of Trieste, and I often take a glimpse of the sea. After lunch, I get down to work. My concentration improves in the afternoon and I give my best in the evening, while my cat (the faithful translator’s companion) sleeps on the couch or underneath a table lamp.

Why did you choose translation as a career?

I soon discovered in my teens my passion for languages and travelling. I took several language courses in London, Dublin and Edinburgh and studied foreign languages in high school and then here in Trieste. After a few years in a multinational company, I took one year off to go to the English-speaking part of Canada to improve my spoken English. After coming back, I started to work for translation agencies, first in-house and then as a freelancer.

You are one of our most regular and trusted patent translators. How did you become interested in this specific field of the industry?

Most in life happens by chance. In 2006 in Milan I was introduced to a patent translation agency, and I started to translate IP-related documents, especially mechanical. After taking a master’s course in medical and pharmaceutical translation, I included chemical and pharmaceutical patents as well.

Being a freelancer, how do you find balance between work and private life?

My profession can be demanding and sometimes friends and relatives can feel neglected. After a few frantic years, I have made a point not to work on weekends, in order to find the time to relax and to travel.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

SeproTec is a professional and reliable company and the project managers are nice individuals, who can motivate collaborators to give their best and who answer promptly to all questions. I really enjoy working with them.

Do you have a life motto?

Not just one, it can vary. At the moment I would choose the following:

Stop trying to make things happen. Let things happen.

Thank you, Cristina! It’s a pleasure to have you in our Team of translators! Enjoy your SeproHoodie! (And say Hello to your lovely cat!)

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: December 2018

enero 17th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Happy New Year!

At the beginning of the new year we have a pleasure to announce the fifteenth winner of our monthly action: Translator of the Month, December 2018!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

We would like you to meet Elettra Zanetti, and invite you to read an interview with her.

Elettra, what do you start your work day with?

I usually spend half an hour playing with my dog or cuddling her. Then, we share breakfast, she has her own biscuit with some water and I have mine with some milk or a cup of tea. As a matter of fact, I am no fan of daily routine, so every day can be different depending on my commitments.  Whenever possible I’d rather start working late in the morning, continue until late evening and then, after practising some swimming, through the night. I enjoy working at night when it is quiet and silence surrounds me. It helps me concentrate and achieve my best results. On the other hand, I am a late sleeper and seldom wake up before 9 am.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation?

Eight years ago. I had been working as a Sales Administration Officer for a multinational company for some years. It was a nice job in a steady company, but the routine was killing me. At that time, translating contracts from English into Italian was one of my tasks. One day, something clicked inside my brain and I asked myself “Why not?”. I took a year leave and attended an MA course in Translation and Interpreting in London. When I returned to Italy, I started my own business as a freelance translator

Being a freelancer, how do you find balance between work and private life?

I juggle tasks, commitments and affections. It is kind of every-day tuning and I work on it with my husband an my family. According to my experience, every career implies sacrifice and self-denial from us and a lot of understanding from those living with us. Prioritizing is capital and I have made a point of sparing some time for myself every day. I call it my “airtime”. It helps me to relax, and provides me the energy to manage everything.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

My feeling is that Seprotec is a well-organized company, at least as far a project management is involved. However, in my opinion, no matter how well structured a company can be, it needs smart people there to keep it going. All the PMs I have worked with in Seprotec have proved to be great professionals and nice human beings, which is the perfect combination.

In your opinion, what are the biggest challenges the translation industry is facing nowadays?

The challenge could be summarized in two words: time and quality. Deadlines are becoming increasingly tighter and it requires a cool head and a wealth of professionalism, efficiency and expertise to meet them all while producing quality work.

Which is your favourite book?

This is a difficult question! I love a bunch of them. But if I absolutely have to pick one, then it is The Razor’s Edge by Somerset Maugham. It is a novel about the hard path to enlightment and happiness which actually lie in spirituality and knowledge, far from the conventional, materialistic life that most people pursue.

Thank you, Elettra! Working with you is a real plasure. Enjoy your SeproHoodie! ;)

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: November 2018

diciembre 17th, 2018 | Posted by admin in Sin categoría - (Comentarios desactivados)

As the year is coming to an end, we announce the fourteenth winner of our Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Claudia Händel, who is one of our most trusted patent translators.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you start your work day with?

I start out with the obligatory good cup (or two) of tea – without that I won’t survive the day and then I check all the emails, in order to warm up for the ‘real’ work.

How did you become interested in the patent translation industry?

When I started to receive more and more offers for patent translations, I decided to get more involved in this subject, so over time I gained insight into the terminology and particular phrasings of patent translations which eventually came to make up a large part of my current work.

If you hadn’t become a translator, what do you think you would have done?

As an animal aficionado owning Labrador Retriever dogs, I would have probably done something in the veterinary field or some work with animals (which I am doing in my spare time now, training and showing dogs).

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

The work culture at SeproTec is great. I really like the professionality and friendliness of the SeproTec project managers – it is always a pleasure communicating and resolving any issues with them. This is also true for all the other persons at SeproTec. Furthermore, I like the organizational processes for their user-friendliness and excellent functionality (XTRF portal, accounting, POs).

Human Translation vs Machine Translation – what do you think?

Both are valuable in their own right. I think that a translation done by a human is still superior to that done by a machine, as far as picking up particular meanings and fine nuances is concerned. Yet with frequent repetitions and/or identical text passages machine translations are very helpful, especially for consistency reasons, and in particular for technical texts which are often rather repetitive. MTs serving as a basis for editing by humans is a good combination which facilitates the work of translators and yields good results.

 

Thank you, Claudia! It’s a pleasure to have you in our Team of translators! Enjoy your SeproHoodie! ;)