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About admin

Este es el blog corporativo de SeproTec, una compañía que ha desarrollado una amplia gama de servicios multilingües que ayudan a las empresas e instituciones globales a implantar sus objetivos nacionales e internacionales, sin tener que preocuparse por los problemas del idioma. Desde la traducción de cualquier documentación técnica, a la interpretación en todas sus modalidades, interpretación telefónica o formación. Si deseas saber más sobre SeproTec, puedes dirigirte a su Web www.seprotec.com, o si prefieres conocer al Grupo Sepro al que pertenece SeproTec puedes dirigirte a http://www.gruposepro.com/ http://maps.google.es/maps/place?cid=1982362385721946599&q=Seprotec&hl=es&sll=40.396764,-3.713379&sspn=11.875058,33.178711&ie=UTF8&ll=46.073231,-20.302734&spn=0,0&z=6

Important Alert for Translators

julio 10th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month | Translators | Translators without Borders - (Comentarios desactivados)

We have recently discovered that some freelance translators have received fraudulent translation offers in the name of SeproTec from accounts external to our company.

We ask that all freelance translators make sure that the offers they are receiving come from a reliable SeproTec source, and always from one of our corporate email addresses.

If you are in any way unsure, please contact vm@seprotec.com.

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

The Medical Devices Regulation (MDR) will be applicable from May 2021.

Linguistic changes affected by the new MDR

The aim of MDR, which will be applied directly in all European Member States, replacing the existing EU directives on medical devices and active implantable medical devices, is to introduce a common regulatory framework for the medical devices market throughout the European Union – to set high standards of quality and safety and to harmonize the principles of implementation medical devices for marketing and use.

The European Union’s Medical Device Regulation will affect your medical products and their Instructions for Use (IFUs).

Apart from monitoring more thoroughly the safety profile of the products placed on the market through implementation of a post-market surveillance (PMS) plan, implementing and maintaining a risk management system throughout the lifecycle of a device is also needed. Companies not following the new rules will no longer be allowed to sell their medical products in the European Union.

An increased demand will be placed on manufacturers labelling and packing requirements through the MDR. According to FDA figures there has been a large increase inproduct recalls in the last decade of which 15 percent can be attributed to labelling errors. There will be requirements for manufacturers to have labels ready for immediate printing, thereby reducing the risk of a mass recall. In addition, companies must provide “instructions for use” (IFUs) that correspond to the format as defined by the EU MDR. The IFUs are available in several languages and require authoritative approval leading to significant effort for its management throughout the registration, production, and distribution process. The proposed procedures will enable the distribution process for appropriate IFU’s, making sure they are available in the correct language and updated as required.

MDR – Article 10 – General obligations of manufacturers states that ‘Manufacturers shall ensure that the device is accompanied by the information set out in Section 23 of Annex I in an official Union language(s) determined by the Member State in which the device is made available to the user or patient.’

The Regulation determines the kind of information that a manufacturer needs to include on a medical device:

  • (a) information allowing the identification of the device, including the device name, serial number, lot number, the UDI, the device model, as well as the name, address and the website of the manufacturer
  • (b) any warnings, precautions or measures to be taken by the patient or a healthcare professional with regard to reciprocal interference with reasonably foreseeable external influences, medical examinations or environmental conditions
  • (c) any information about the expected lifetime of the device and any necessary follow-up
  • (d) any other information to ensure safe use of the device by the patient, including the information in point (u) of Section 23.4 of Annex I. (the overall qualitative and quantitative information on the materials and substances to which patients can be exposed)

Additionally, the Article 18 thereof states that the information shall be stated in the language(s) determined by the concerned Member State. The information shall be written in a way that is readily understood by a lay person and shall be updated where appropriate. Updates of the information shall be made available to the patient via the website.

To see whether your company is ready for the new MDR, and in order to find gaps within a company, it is recommended that you perform a complete gap analysis. You should start with a gap assessment and evaluation of your current situation considering the type of product and define the required step to achieve compliance to MDR 2017/745. The goal of such MDR analysis is to help a Medical Company like Manufacturer, Distributor, Importer, Authorized Representative or Consultants to implement the new Regulation MDR and IVDR in an easier way. Pharma and life science companies will need to conduct a gap analysis from the linguistic point of view also to determine if any of the EU member state languages are missing in the documentation. If so, a strategy to add those missing languages is required in order to distribute product in those countries.

At SeproTec pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, chemistry and healthcare are some of our specialties. We employ the latest technological advances in translation in work processes designed from the ground up to meet the specific needs of life science sector organizations. To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your multilingual projects, reach out to our global team today.

For further information on the new MDR, https://ec.europa.eu/health/md_sector/new_regulations_en

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: May 2020

julio 1st, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.
Today we chat with Cornelia Forster, one of our most trusted German translators and the Translator of the month in May. 
Congratulations Cornelia and thank you for taking the time to talk to us.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?
I studied translation and interpreting, and always wanted to work as a translator and interpreter. Working for different companies in London only turned me into a “part-time” translator, and the same happened in my jobs in Spain. Only when I decided to work as a freelancer, I reached my goal to become a full-time translator/interpreter.

Cornelia Froster, Translator and Interpreter

Cornelia Froster, Translator of the Month May 2020

Being a freelancer, how do you balance work and personal life?
It took several years to keep work in the office and not let work encroach on my free time. It helps to make do-lists and set clear deadlines, and specifically arrange activities.

What do you start your workday with?
I first organize, what I have to do outside of work during the day or in the evening, then I look at what I need to achieve or complete during the day, prioritise the projects, and then I start work.

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?
Anybody who does not need translations looks up to people who speak more than one language. However, as soon as they have to pay for translations, the situation changes and I feel we’re underrated. I also feel they do not appreciate that we had to go to university to learn our skills, and swear before a court that we take responsibility for the correctness of our translations, which are a vital means for international communication.

What do you enjoy the most about working as a translator?
Being my own boss, and the variety of subjects.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?
Take your studies seriously, and live in the country or countries of the languages you’re translating from for a few years to understand the language and culture better.

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Thank you so much, Cornelia! It’s a great honour to have you among the team of our translators. And… enjoy your SeproHoodie!

SeproTec Translator of the Month: April 2020

junio 17th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Chatting with... | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of April 2020 edition of our  Translator of the Month action. 

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Berthold Kynast, one of our most regular and trusted German-language patent translators. 

 __________________

Hi Berthold,

What do you start your workday with?

Usually reading the bible, a prayer to God for success in my work, my power drink for good brain performance and concentration, a light breakfast with self-made yoghurt and fruits.

What do you enjoy the most about working as a translator?

That by doing my translation work I can always read about the most interesting new technology while being paid for this.

You are one of our most regular and trusted patent translators. How did you become interested in this specific field of the industry?

I am coming from a family of inventors myself, especially my grandfather, and from childhood I was very much into inventing technical things myself, constructing them, using them, and my first and only employment was in the patent department of a world company as a translator for translating the patents into English for the US-patent office, correspondence to the different patent offices and patent attorneys in the different countries, and competent employee for setting up the patent files from scratch with the inventors in the company. There I learnt how to write patents myself, and I set up and filed some of my inventions myself in the German patent office.

Being a freelancer, how have you been balancing work and personal life especially now during confinement?

In fact as I am working from home anyway with my Bulgarian wife, there was not changing much, only with the confinement the order volume in the first time strongly decreased and also the deadlines were becoming much shorter, most orders were quite small, and the large size orders almost disappeared since Corona, to this day (I hope this will change again). Indeed, only from Seprotec are coming orders regularly, but Seprotec is the best anyway! ❤️

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?

This is clearly the case; it was for me until I got to work for Seprotec. Before, the rates were so low and the costs of living so high that I had to shift from Germany to Bulgaria (for what I am very thankful now because I am so happy here) in order to be able to live a normal life with what I was earning. Many agencies literally kind of abuse the freelancers by loading work on them which has nothing to do with the translation, which they are not even able to do professionally, but with time consuming layout work, which is decreasing the rate further. Seprotec is the first agency ever where I see a perfect professional approach to the translation field and the translators, which is also reflected in the rate and the payment delay, as well as in the contact with the Project Managers. The first time as a translator I feel valued and estimated. And this I try to give back to Seprotec with each order also in future.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

To use personal contacts to find orders from direct customers and to join a professional translators association, this was where I was contacted from Seprotec through their database. At first, I would recommend visiting events like the SDL roadshows or other exhibitions where translation agencies are present, but to take utmost care about the conditions under which has to be done the work, and the payment as well as payment delays. Also every agency has the own preferred CAT tool, so that a beginner translator has not to buy instantly new software, I would recommend to ask the agency if they have possibility to give a free license for use of the software at least in the beginning, or if they have group arrangements for buying software at a cheaper price.

 

Thank you so much, Berthold!  It has been a pleasure to chat with you, thank you for your kind words about SeproTec and our team and enjoy your SeproHoodie!

SeproTec Translator of the Month: March 2020

junio 4th, 2020 | Posted by admin in SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of March 2020 edition of our Translator of the Month action

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Katarzyna Tomaszewska, one of our most trusted German into Polish translators.

Hi Katarzyna! Let’s start :) Being a freelancer, how do you balance work and personal life?

It’s not easy, especially having a little child. However, I’ve managed to divide household chores with my husband fairly and now I believe we’re doing pretty good.

What do you start your work day with?

I usually start my day with a cup of coffee and proofreading projects that are due that morning. Only after do I think about my breakfast.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

I’ve dreamt about it ever since I was a University student. After I graduated, I got an internship in a renowned translation agency, and this is how my adventure with professional translation began.

What is your favourite book and what are you currently reading?

I don’t have one favourite book since I just love reading. Right now I’m reading “The Narrow Road to the Deep North” by Richard Flanagan.

Besides work, what other things do you do to keep yourself occupied during confinement?

To be honest, the pandemic didn’t affect my life that much – I’ve always worked from home, and in my free time I read books or go for a walk in the woods with my family.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

It’s good to read a lot to be proficient in our native language.

 Thank you so much for your time, Katarzyna, and for the great cooperation!

Enjoy your SeproHoodie :)

Medical translations are possibly some of the most complicated kinds of translations to do. Here we’ve reviewed the requirements a translator must meet to take them on with all the keys to success.

What is a medical translation?

They are usually texts such as scientific articles, drug package inserts and clinical reports, or other content related to medicine or the pharmaceutical industry. It seems logical to surmise that translating them would require specific training on the topic and absolute accuracy.

What requirements must a medical document translator meet?

Requirements on education and experience: medical translators should have a recognized graduate qualification in translation or in any other field from an institution of higher education plus a minimum of two years of full-time professional experience in translating; native level in target language and a fluency level in the source language. Medical translators must be fully aware of cultural sensitivity issues, for example, some medical terms for diseases have a direct translation in the second language, while other terms have been adopted from English language.

It is the translator’s responsibility to maintain the patient’s privacy when doing their job. Its essential to ensure patient-physician confidentiality.

A professional medical translator must keep him/herself up to date  with the latest improvements and advances that have been made in the medicine industry and in medical technology.

Aside from a fluent level of the source language, experts in this kind of professional translation should understand that

· Their work must be highly rigorous, since the result directly affects the health of the readers. In fact, as a prerequisite the translator must be an expert in the pharmaceutical industry and scientific terminology.

· It is more than likely that the translator will need to do clinical research to find out what the exact translations of the terms are.

· This is a technical translation: synonyms, paraphrasing, and different wordings cannot be used. Either a known medical term or one that can be explained with footnotes must be chosen.

· Medical language is characterized by its direct and objective style. Every word counts, and the end text must have an expository clarity that makes it easy to understand.

· When terminology is used it should be clarified and justified in a footnote so readers will be able to easily understand it.

· Haste makes waste. Medical translations should be done with enough time to do a good job. New versions of previous texts should be translated from scratch so as not to repeat previous poor translations.

Why is doing a good medical translation so hard?

Because in any other field there are always references in the target language to check. Translating an article about a scientific discovery or about a new drug means the translator is on their own; they almost have to do some of the same research the author of the text did.

If you find yourself in this situation as a translator, keep the tips above in mind. If you need to purchase this kind of translation, choose an agency that offers pharmaceutical translation services to ensure the best result possible.

We hope we’ve given you a basic idea of what medical translations entail. Only the very best translators, like the ones at SeproTec, feel confident enough to take on these kinds of assignments because of their unquestionable complexity and the consequences of not doing a perfect job. Pharmaceutical companies, clinical research organizations (CROs), medical and surgical devices manufacturers and biotech companies rely on us for translation of their most sensitive documents and our strict quality control on the translated content. SeproTec delivers consistently clear, accurate translation of high-value information and our clients may be 100% sure they can depend on us.

To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your projects, reach out to our global team today.

Chatting with a Conference Interpreter on RSI services

mayo 20th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Chatting with... | Interpreting | RSI | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

Due to the rise of remote interpreting services and more specifically the Remote Simultaneous Interpretation, we would like you to meet Loreto Rodríguez Untoria, one of our most trusted conference interpreters to chat about the service and to share with you a professional’s point of view.

Hi, Loreto! We’re so glad you agreed to talk to us and to share your point of view! Let’s get straight to the point. Several weeks ago, we woke up in a completely different reality. To make a long story short: the world went online. This affects interpreting companies as well. We’ve read the stories of businesses going online but how about conference interpreters: how do you feel this challenge affects you?

Of course, our interpreting lives, and personal lives, have been turned upside down. I consider myself lucky because in the field of market research we have been using these systems for at least five years. Still, we will have to go through training on how to use these new platforms. Also, when we use them for the first time, we face many challenges and our work becomes even more stressful. This new way of working is also affecting our families who need to remain quiet and stay away from the WIFI, not an easy task with teens at home.

From your experience, do you think clients take Remote Simultaneous Interpreting as an opportunity or a threat?

I actually consider it an opportunity. Face to face meetings will come back, but many companies are realizing that remote systems are good for smaller meetings which went without translation because clients wanted to avoid travelling expenses and all costs associated with simultaneous interpreting.

I think that in the future both systems will coexist, clients are already realizing that RSI is feasible for many types of meetings and events and we will benefit from the concurrence of different solutions, as proven in so many sectors.

We at SeproTec believe that moving the conferences and events to the online world can help clients go through the crisis. We also strongly believe that, with the help of professional interpreting companies they can be well prepared to host multilingual online events and we are concentrating our efforts in explaining  and counselling them on the various options available in the market to best suit their needs.  As a professional interpreter with experience on RSI, what would be your advice to the clients?

I totally agree with you, RSI can be very helpful for businesses that want to thrive in these difficult times. My advice to the clients is to trust an experienced provider. They will be able to support them with the platform that best suits their needs, contact the best interpreters for specific services and organise all the technical aspects. Also, as happens in face to face meetings, the events can be more successful if the client can provide us, the interpreters, with the necessary documentation so that we can prepare for the event. It is also advisable to run a test before the event and to be able to talk to the main speakers to further clarify terms and to explain to them how interpretation works.

Also, for those who want to try RSI but are reluctant, my advice is to start with a small meeting or a webinar, so they can see the dynamic and become familiar with interpretation services. I am sure that afterwards they will feel more comfortable to take on bigger events.

The technology available on the market is improving on a daily basis and we are getting new solutions every day.  Prior to COVID-19 shutdowns, only 17% professional interpreters embraced and were familiar with RSI technologies. From our experience, the interpreters we work with are, on the contrary, always excited to be able to use the newest technologies which may facilitate this process. So, are you willing to use it?

I’m more than ready!!! And based on what I’ve seen in LinkedIn and on what I’ve heard, most of my colleagues are also happy to embrace these new platforms. Most of us are learning about them and, I guess, platform developers are also learning to improve them to make them more interpreter friendly.

What are the main advantages of a conference interpreting job being ‘transferred’ to online? Do you feel, as lots of our interpreters do, that this may be less stressful for an interpreter than working from a booth? We are not only talking about working from home – there are other places where an interpreter can perform her/his job, like a hub, office or a studio…

Well, you can sit in a nice, cosy, undisturbed spot at home where you feel comfortable working, and you can do so while wearing more comfortable clothes than the one you wear to an on-site event ;)

The great advantage is that, on line, interpreters can accept projects from all over the world, thus increasing their geographical reach. It is also good because many of the projects that they though impossible have now become feasible and it allows them to get access to the best interpreters  regardless of their geographical location, something which was unthinkable offline.

What are the main differences between onsite and remote simultaneous interpreting? Apart from not being ‘locked’ in one booth with your co-interpreter, of course :)

They are totally different!! Being at the same booth with a colleague is key to run a smooth and natural interpretation.  At the moment, with RSI to avoid inconsistencies in terminology and style, we have to keep the contact with your virtual booth mate through other desktop digital technologies, which we need to get used to.  Also, as mentioned, we miss being able to talk with the speaker before doing our job, not to mention receiving documentation beforehand. Still, I’m optimistic and I’m sure that some of the problems that we are currently facing will be solved soon.

Now that you had the chance to review SeproTec’s online training platform on RSI with some of the advice we are giving to our interpreters listed below,

do you agree? What, based on your experience, would you add to the list?

I agree with your advice, I would highlight the necessity of getting familiar with a desktop version of a secured communication tool and keep it open in your computer to better communicate with your booth mate.

It is also a good idea to invest in a good headset with noise cancellation microphone, audio surge protector, dual monitors and an uninterruptible power supply system to deliver the service with full security.

Thank you Loreto for your time and for the important insight!

Thank you!!! Keep safe everybody.

3 Criteria for Pharma Companies Evaluating Language Service Providers

mayo 11th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | Life Sciences | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

For many pharmaceutical companies, sourcing translations for documentation such as clinical protocols, labels, safety reports, questionnaires, PROs, COAs, and more may be as straightforward as letting their CRO take care of it.

Others, though, may rely on a patchwork of solutions, where each department works with its own vendors, even if the company has a centralized list of preferred suppliers.

If your role requires managing the internationalization of your company’s products, whether it’s during research and development of new candidates or supporting commercialized products that have been on the market for years, you might be stuck in a rut without even knowing it.

Sure, things may seem to be humming along smoothly, but on the other hand, maybe there are consistent nuisances in the process that, if addressed, could greatly improve your quality of life. Many companies, especially large ones, usually follow the path of least resistance and continue to work with established providers because “that’s how [we've] always done it.”

In a field focused on innovation and results, though, this can’t be the case.

We asked some of our own clients what they value most when it comes to sourcing translations. Here’s what they said:

Accuracy

Especially in the strictly regulated realm of clinical research, accuracy is indispensable. Mistranslations can be costly, both financially and socially.

If a patent isn’t translated precisely, you may as well not file the patent abroad at all.

If a questionnaire has not been translated with the relevant cultural context taken into account for different target groups, it can muddy your data.

And if an ingredient on a label is mistranslated, revising and resubmitting the relevant documents for approval can be expensive. Even worse, an end user of the product might be adversely affected, opening up your company to litigation.

Any language service provider (LSP) will tout its quality, but how can you be sure your provider is actually delivering? Here are some ways to find out:

1. Does your LSP possess internationally recognized certifications such as ISO 17100 or ISO 9001? Most mature LSPs consider these de rigeur, but not all providers are created equal. Check to see when your vendors’ certificates were last validated.

2. Does your LSP specialize in life sciences and use native speakers of the target languages? Many LSPs claim to specialize in certain areas, but the dirty secret of the industry is that many translation companies simply farm out work to other, lesser-known vendors further down the proverbial food chain. It’s imperative that your vendor retain complete control over the quality of the final product.

3. Do you receive feedback from other internal stakeholders or end users? Not all companies have multilingual employees who can review every language you translate– and honestly, you shouldn’t need to rely on these employees to do so. However, if you have colleagues who have voiced concerns about the translations you’re receiving, perhaps it’s time to evaluate other options.

Speed

While cost is always a factor for anyone responsible for outsourcing work, we consistently found that an LSP’s ability to turnaround projects quickly remains a deciding factor for many pharmaceutical companies, and they are often willing to pay more for this capability.

It’s important to remember that translation is not simply a mechanical process. For the accuracy required for life science documents, especially documents subject to regulatory scrutiny or intended for external use, human translators are necessary.

While it’s true that these humans work with computer assisted translation tools (CAT tools), haste usually makes waste. It is possible to assign multiple linguists to a single project, but this exponentially increases the risks of inconsistencies, mistakes, and breaches of data security.

Still, even though it’s important to keep reasonable expectations in mind, LSPs that can deliver translations quickly without sacrificing the aforementioned accuracy are valuable partners worth keeping, even if they cost more. Remember to weigh the costs of a good LSP against the possible costs of missed submission deadlines, multiple rounds of revisions, and even brand reputation.

Relationship

Your language services partner might provide an above average product, but how is your relationship with them?

Good LSPs do everything they can to create a frictionless workflow to make it as easy as possible for their clients to obtain quotes, approve projects, and submit feedback. But as much as it might be tempting to adopt a “set it and forget it” mentality, especially if things seem to be going all right, it’s crucial that your point of contact be available and communicative.

Does your LSP proactively warn you of any issues that arise during the course of a project? Do they watch out for you by educating you about more cost-effective alternatives based on the needs of different projects?

We in the localization industry are a naturally communicative lot. Words and language are our passion, so don’t be afraid to talk to your account manager.

Ultimately, outsourcing your translation needs to us requires a tremendous amount of trust on your part. Of course LSPs ought to provide high quality, speedy translations, but part of the value they ought to add comes in the form of being a trusted consultant who can offer so much more than just translation. If you can’t leverage your LSP’s experience in both your industry and the broader localization world, why are you keeping them around?

Whether you’ve been working with a provider for a while or you’re just starting out on the sometimes overwhelming path to commercializing your products internationally, it’s vital that you pick a language services provider with the necessary experience, know-how, and reliability to function not just as a vendor, but as a trustworthy partner. To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your projects, reach out to our global team today.

Written by Edward Carlin, SeproTec’s Business Development Manager, based in Austin, TX.

Our world has recently become a world of online presence. In the pandemic times we mainly work remotely. As an industry that relies upon travel and thrives on face-to-face interactions, we are truly aware that the recent coronavirus outbreak is a pressing concern for many professionals: those who work in event management, those who used to travel the world to take part in the board meetings and meet different stakeholders, those who take part in panel discussions, to name just a few.

Indeed, in light of the virus’ rapid spread, many events and meetings across the globe have been cancelled or postponed to help minimise the risk of contamination.

How do you create connections when you aren’t face-to-face…?

What if those events and meetings could be hosted, managed and delivered remotely and in any language?

Well wonder no more: companies with multilingual meetings are trying to find a way to push them online and they are actually successful: it is entirely possible and the technology exists – we all use video communication tools such as Skype or Hangouts every day. But many have limitations on time, the number of users or interface control and they lack an important element for multilingual events: an interpreter.

Remote Simultaneous Interpreting (RSI) is known to be revolutionizing the world of interpreting. It is to be considered the best solution for simultaneous interpretation at conferences and web meetings in which several foreign languages are spoken.

The benefits of a remote interpreting service are clear:

- It’s designed for situations where speakers, delegates and interpreters cannot travel

- There’s no need for infrastructure, costly monthly subscriptions or expensive software license – just click on the link or download an app and you’re ready to go

- It can support any number of speakers, interpreters and languages

- It allows sharing of presentations and chat among users

- It’s flexible and scalable – events can be arranged at short notice, sometimes within a few hours!

Remote Simultaneous Interpreting_SeproTec

SeproTec’s Remote Interpreting Platform covers all bases, as it is in essence a remote event conferencing software which includes consecutive or simultaneous interpretation, enabling conversations supporting any number of users and languages.

 

 

Trends in translation always used to go hand in hand with contemporaneous technological innovations and economic models. E-commerce, for example, has a marked effect on the types of translations that will be needed in the future. Meanwhile, technological improvements also influence the way translations are produced.

The future of the translation sector during these times of COVID-19.

Below, we analyze the main focal points related to the field of translation that will become particularly relevant in 2020. As we will see, the vast majority of them are related to networks and the way people consume and search for content on these networks.

Multimedia localization

Multimedia content (audio, video, flash movies, animation, e-learning content, rich media, and interactive materials) is an invaluable tool today for business worldwide. Multimedia has become both an effective and efficient way of connecting with a target audience. It is the process of modifying media, such as audio or video, with the aim of adapting to the preferences and the needs of people across the globe.

Often translation solutions are the key component of multimedia localization. However, additional aspects such as cultural differences and local regulations must always be taken into consideration by multimedia localization providers. By combining both translation and technical skills, they are able to produce high-quality media that reflect both the target audience and the source material. Multimedia localization can be a powerful communication tool—regardless of whether it is utilized for commercial or informational purposes. Due to high demand, increased need, and interest in information, more and more businesses and organizations are turning to multimedia such as e-learning modules and videos as a way to inform, train, and educate their customers and employees both locally and globally. In numerous cases recently, a lack of information or the wrong information—either provided inadvertently or maliciously—somewhat amplified the effects of feeling the fear of the unknown during this time of COVID-19.

Video translation

Video is becoming ever more entrenched as the main content format in the modern world. It is effective, it is viral, and platforms and websites position it better than they do text. This is mainly because users consume it more. Therefore, another important market niche in the translation sector will be the one that handles effective subtitling and dubbing of this visual content.
Online education

In an increasingly globalized environment, teaching is no longer merely local. Today, we can learn to play the piano with lessons on YouTube or attend private engineering classes from the other side of the world. Ultimately, education seems to be moving towards a borderless and barrier-free approach and one of the main barriers that we have to tear down is that of language.

The translation industry must therefore increase working with these types of audiovisual formats. What difficulties can arise? Mainly, handling the technical jargon inherent in each discipline.

Machine translation

Since the 17th century, attempts have been made to develop methods to allow for instant text translation. Fast content translations—and of the highest quality—are currently needed globally.
Thanks to the sophisticated solutions as well as the know-how of translation agencies to select the best solution for each project and feed the engines, machine translation automatically translates much of a text with increasing precision. Then we can tweak and correct any inaccuracies or errors that may have occurred in the process. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that this is a system that can be recommended as long as you utilize a full post-editing service to ensure the best possible quality.

Video Remote Interpreting

Video remote interpreting (VRI) is a video-telecommunication service that uses devices such as web cameras or videophones to provide sign language or spoken language interpreting services. This is done through a remote or off-site interpreter, in order to communicate with persons with whom there is a communication barrier. VRI is a growing field with one popular application being in the hospital emergency room. In this setting, it is essential that patients and caregivers communicate readily with medical personnel, but it may take time for a face-to-face interpreter to arrive on site. Hospitals with VRI capability can connect with a remote interpreter quickly and conduct triage and intake surveys with the patient or caregiver without significant delay. VRI is an extremely important tool when it comes to working with patients who do not speak English. When treating Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients, it is highly recommended for healthcare providers to add a video remote interpreter for medical interpretation during the communication session. Nowadays, VRI can also help reduce the spread of infection. Healthcare facilities can take steps to limit exposure by using VRI to communicate with their patients rather than meeting them in person.

 

Video Remote Interpreting bridges the gap between Over-the-Phone Interpreting (OPI) and in-person interpreting solutions, reducing the time and cost associated with travel and adding the advantage of visual support to OPI services.
The challenge of artificial intelligence (AI)

AI will allow both a much more direct and dynamic translation of much of the content on the web. Furthermore, well-trained artificial intelligence can learn quickly from its mistakes. It will therefore become an extremely useful element for translation agencies, since it will allow us to speed up our work.

In conclusion, the latest trends in translation show great advances in technology, but at the same time highlight the importance of a good agency of professionals who can manage each assignment properly, such as ourselves here at SeproTec, where we always work with one eye looking firmly towards the future.

 

It is also important to emphasize that 2020 is a seemingly good year to understand how external factors influence our sector. CSA predicted that the language services industry would continue to grow and that the market would increase to $56.18 billion by 2021. However, the unexpected global lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will affect all these market trends greatly. Organizations will continue to make their products and services available in more languages, however, this may be at a much slower rate than before, as we have seen in recent times the significant economic impact of the coronavirus on financial markets and vulnerable industries such as manufacturing, tourism, hospitality, and travel.

On the other hand, the coronavirus crisis has only heightened the need for innovation and co-creation.

We expect to see a different market split by segment for this year than previously predicted.