Important Alert for Translators

julio 10th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month | Translators | Translators without Borders - (Comentarios desactivados)

We have recently discovered that some freelance translators have received fraudulent translation offers in the name of SeproTec from accounts external to our company.

We ask that all freelance translators make sure that the offers they are receiving come from a reliable SeproTec source, and always from one of our corporate email addresses.

If you are in any way unsure, please contact vm@seprotec.com.

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

The Medical Devices Regulation (MDR) will be applicable from May 2021.

Linguistic changes affected by the new MDR

The aim of MDR, which will be applied directly in all European Member States, replacing the existing EU directives on medical devices and active implantable medical devices, is to introduce a common regulatory framework for the medical devices market throughout the European Union – to set high standards of quality and safety and to harmonize the principles of implementation medical devices for marketing and use.

The European Union’s Medical Device Regulation will affect your medical products and their Instructions for Use (IFUs).

Apart from monitoring more thoroughly the safety profile of the products placed on the market through implementation of a post-market surveillance (PMS) plan, implementing and maintaining a risk management system throughout the lifecycle of a device is also needed. Companies not following the new rules will no longer be allowed to sell their medical products in the European Union.

An increased demand will be placed on manufacturers labelling and packing requirements through the MDR. According to FDA figures there has been a large increase inproduct recalls in the last decade of which 15 percent can be attributed to labelling errors. There will be requirements for manufacturers to have labels ready for immediate printing, thereby reducing the risk of a mass recall. In addition, companies must provide “instructions for use” (IFUs) that correspond to the format as defined by the EU MDR. The IFUs are available in several languages and require authoritative approval leading to significant effort for its management throughout the registration, production, and distribution process. The proposed procedures will enable the distribution process for appropriate IFU’s, making sure they are available in the correct language and updated as required.

MDR – Article 10 – General obligations of manufacturers states that ‘Manufacturers shall ensure that the device is accompanied by the information set out in Section 23 of Annex I in an official Union language(s) determined by the Member State in which the device is made available to the user or patient.’

The Regulation determines the kind of information that a manufacturer needs to include on a medical device:

  • (a) information allowing the identification of the device, including the device name, serial number, lot number, the UDI, the device model, as well as the name, address and the website of the manufacturer
  • (b) any warnings, precautions or measures to be taken by the patient or a healthcare professional with regard to reciprocal interference with reasonably foreseeable external influences, medical examinations or environmental conditions
  • (c) any information about the expected lifetime of the device and any necessary follow-up
  • (d) any other information to ensure safe use of the device by the patient, including the information in point (u) of Section 23.4 of Annex I. (the overall qualitative and quantitative information on the materials and substances to which patients can be exposed)

Additionally, the Article 18 thereof states that the information shall be stated in the language(s) determined by the concerned Member State. The information shall be written in a way that is readily understood by a lay person and shall be updated where appropriate. Updates of the information shall be made available to the patient via the website.

To see whether your company is ready for the new MDR, and in order to find gaps within a company, it is recommended that you perform a complete gap analysis. You should start with a gap assessment and evaluation of your current situation considering the type of product and define the required step to achieve compliance to MDR 2017/745. The goal of such MDR analysis is to help a Medical Company like Manufacturer, Distributor, Importer, Authorized Representative or Consultants to implement the new Regulation MDR and IVDR in an easier way. Pharma and life science companies will need to conduct a gap analysis from the linguistic point of view also to determine if any of the EU member state languages are missing in the documentation. If so, a strategy to add those missing languages is required in order to distribute product in those countries.

At SeproTec pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, chemistry and healthcare are some of our specialties. We employ the latest technological advances in translation in work processes designed from the ground up to meet the specific needs of life science sector organizations. To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your multilingual projects, reach out to our global team today.

For further information on the new MDR, https://ec.europa.eu/health/md_sector/new_regulations_en

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: May 2020

julio 1st, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.
Today we chat with Cornelia Forster, one of our most trusted German translators and the Translator of the month in May. 
Congratulations Cornelia and thank you for taking the time to talk to us.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?
I studied translation and interpreting, and always wanted to work as a translator and interpreter. Working for different companies in London only turned me into a “part-time” translator, and the same happened in my jobs in Spain. Only when I decided to work as a freelancer, I reached my goal to become a full-time translator/interpreter.

Cornelia Froster, Translator and Interpreter

Cornelia Froster, Translator of the Month May 2020

Being a freelancer, how do you balance work and personal life?
It took several years to keep work in the office and not let work encroach on my free time. It helps to make do-lists and set clear deadlines, and specifically arrange activities.

What do you start your workday with?
I first organize, what I have to do outside of work during the day or in the evening, then I look at what I need to achieve or complete during the day, prioritise the projects, and then I start work.

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?
Anybody who does not need translations looks up to people who speak more than one language. However, as soon as they have to pay for translations, the situation changes and I feel we’re underrated. I also feel they do not appreciate that we had to go to university to learn our skills, and swear before a court that we take responsibility for the correctness of our translations, which are a vital means for international communication.

What do you enjoy the most about working as a translator?
Being my own boss, and the variety of subjects.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?
Take your studies seriously, and live in the country or countries of the languages you’re translating from for a few years to understand the language and culture better.

_________________

Thank you so much, Cornelia! It’s a great honour to have you among the team of our translators. And… enjoy your SeproHoodie!

SeproTec Translator of the Month: April 2020

junio 17th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Chatting with... | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of April 2020 edition of our  Translator of the Month action. 

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Berthold Kynast, one of our most regular and trusted German-language patent translators. 

 __________________

Hi Berthold,

What do you start your workday with?

Usually reading the bible, a prayer to God for success in my work, my power drink for good brain performance and concentration, a light breakfast with self-made yoghurt and fruits.

What do you enjoy the most about working as a translator?

That by doing my translation work I can always read about the most interesting new technology while being paid for this.

You are one of our most regular and trusted patent translators. How did you become interested in this specific field of the industry?

I am coming from a family of inventors myself, especially my grandfather, and from childhood I was very much into inventing technical things myself, constructing them, using them, and my first and only employment was in the patent department of a world company as a translator for translating the patents into English for the US-patent office, correspondence to the different patent offices and patent attorneys in the different countries, and competent employee for setting up the patent files from scratch with the inventors in the company. There I learnt how to write patents myself, and I set up and filed some of my inventions myself in the German patent office.

Being a freelancer, how have you been balancing work and personal life especially now during confinement?

In fact as I am working from home anyway with my Bulgarian wife, there was not changing much, only with the confinement the order volume in the first time strongly decreased and also the deadlines were becoming much shorter, most orders were quite small, and the large size orders almost disappeared since Corona, to this day (I hope this will change again). Indeed, only from Seprotec are coming orders regularly, but Seprotec is the best anyway! ❤️

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?

This is clearly the case; it was for me until I got to work for Seprotec. Before, the rates were so low and the costs of living so high that I had to shift from Germany to Bulgaria (for what I am very thankful now because I am so happy here) in order to be able to live a normal life with what I was earning. Many agencies literally kind of abuse the freelancers by loading work on them which has nothing to do with the translation, which they are not even able to do professionally, but with time consuming layout work, which is decreasing the rate further. Seprotec is the first agency ever where I see a perfect professional approach to the translation field and the translators, which is also reflected in the rate and the payment delay, as well as in the contact with the Project Managers. The first time as a translator I feel valued and estimated. And this I try to give back to Seprotec with each order also in future.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

To use personal contacts to find orders from direct customers and to join a professional translators association, this was where I was contacted from Seprotec through their database. At first, I would recommend visiting events like the SDL roadshows or other exhibitions where translation agencies are present, but to take utmost care about the conditions under which has to be done the work, and the payment as well as payment delays. Also every agency has the own preferred CAT tool, so that a beginner translator has not to buy instantly new software, I would recommend to ask the agency if they have possibility to give a free license for use of the software at least in the beginning, or if they have group arrangements for buying software at a cheaper price.

 

Thank you so much, Berthold!  It has been a pleasure to chat with you, thank you for your kind words about SeproTec and our team and enjoy your SeproHoodie!

For many pharmaceutical companies, sourcing translations for documentation such as clinical protocols, labels, safety reports, questionnaires, PROs, COAs, and more may be as straightforward as letting their CRO take care of it.

Others, though, may rely on a patchwork of solutions, where each department works with its own vendors, even if the company has a centralized list of preferred suppliers.

If your role requires managing the internationalization of your company’s products, whether it’s during research and development of new candidates or supporting commercialized products that have been on the market for years, you might be stuck in a rut without even knowing it.

Sure, things may seem to be humming along smoothly, but on the other hand, maybe there are consistent nuisances in the process that, if addressed, could greatly improve your quality of life. Many companies, especially large ones, usually follow the path of least resistance and continue to work with established providers because “that’s how [we've] always done it.”

In a field focused on innovation and results, though, this can’t be the case.

We asked some of our own clients what they value most when it comes to sourcing translations. Here’s what they said:

Accuracy

Especially in the strictly regulated realm of clinical research, accuracy is indispensable. Mistranslations can be costly, both financially and socially.

If a patent isn’t translated precisely, you may as well not file the patent abroad at all.

If a questionnaire has not been translated with the relevant cultural context taken into account for different target groups, it can muddy your data.

And if an ingredient on a label is mistranslated, revising and resubmitting the relevant documents for approval can be expensive. Even worse, an end user of the product might be adversely affected, opening up your company to litigation.

Any language service provider (LSP) will tout its quality, but how can you be sure your provider is actually delivering? Here are some ways to find out:

1. Does your LSP possess internationally recognized certifications such as ISO 17100 or ISO 9001? Most mature LSPs consider these de rigeur, but not all providers are created equal. Check to see when your vendors’ certificates were last validated.

2. Does your LSP specialize in life sciences and use native speakers of the target languages? Many LSPs claim to specialize in certain areas, but the dirty secret of the industry is that many translation companies simply farm out work to other, lesser-known vendors further down the proverbial food chain. It’s imperative that your vendor retain complete control over the quality of the final product.

3. Do you receive feedback from other internal stakeholders or end users? Not all companies have multilingual employees who can review every language you translate– and honestly, you shouldn’t need to rely on these employees to do so. However, if you have colleagues who have voiced concerns about the translations you’re receiving, perhaps it’s time to evaluate other options.

Speed

While cost is always a factor for anyone responsible for outsourcing work, we consistently found that an LSP’s ability to turnaround projects quickly remains a deciding factor for many pharmaceutical companies, and they are often willing to pay more for this capability.

It’s important to remember that translation is not simply a mechanical process. For the accuracy required for life science documents, especially documents subject to regulatory scrutiny or intended for external use, human translators are necessary.

While it’s true that these humans work with computer assisted translation tools (CAT tools), haste usually makes waste. It is possible to assign multiple linguists to a single project, but this exponentially increases the risks of inconsistencies, mistakes, and breaches of data security.

Still, even though it’s important to keep reasonable expectations in mind, LSPs that can deliver translations quickly without sacrificing the aforementioned accuracy are valuable partners worth keeping, even if they cost more. Remember to weigh the costs of a good LSP against the possible costs of missed submission deadlines, multiple rounds of revisions, and even brand reputation.

Relationship

Your language services partner might provide an above average product, but how is your relationship with them?

Good LSPs do everything they can to create a frictionless workflow to make it as easy as possible for their clients to obtain quotes, approve projects, and submit feedback. But as much as it might be tempting to adopt a “set it and forget it” mentality, especially if things seem to be going all right, it’s crucial that your point of contact be available and communicative.

Does your LSP proactively warn you of any issues that arise during the course of a project? Do they watch out for you by educating you about more cost-effective alternatives based on the needs of different projects?

We in the localization industry are a naturally communicative lot. Words and language are our passion, so don’t be afraid to talk to your account manager.

Ultimately, outsourcing your translation needs to us requires a tremendous amount of trust on your part. Of course LSPs ought to provide high quality, speedy translations, but part of the value they ought to add comes in the form of being a trusted consultant who can offer so much more than just translation. If you can’t leverage your LSP’s experience in both your industry and the broader localization world, why are you keeping them around?

Whether you’ve been working with a provider for a while or you’re just starting out on the sometimes overwhelming path to commercializing your products internationally, it’s vital that you pick a language services provider with the necessary experience, know-how, and reliability to function not just as a vendor, but as a trustworthy partner. To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your projects, reach out to our global team today.

Written by Edward Carlin, SeproTec’s Business Development Manager, based in Austin, TX.

The words that save lives

marzo 23rd, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | International | Interpretación | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Literally several days ago we woke up in a new reality. The world seems to have stopped. Most of us have been more or less affected by COVID-19. Sometimes it’s about businesses, sometimes the situation is more serious: it’s about our family members.

The language industry will play a vital role in communications in this time of crisis, and communication is the key nowadays to advance the knowledge on this global issue.

Words that Save Lives_SeproTec_COVID19

Today we are particularly proud of our translators and interpreters – often on-site, in crisis places, in hospitals, at police precincts, courthouses, social aid centers and clinics.

You are our everyday #heroes!

Just keep in mind that every word the industry translates or interprets on COVID-19 helps saving lives.

#proudtobepartoftheindustry

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: January 2020!

febrero 25th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of January 2020 edition of our Translator of the Month action

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Antonio Teixeira, one of our most trusted English and Spanish into Portuguese translators!

Hi Antonio! Let’s start! Being a freelancer, how do you balance work and personal life?

I have quite a defined routine: I go to the gym from 7am to 8am and after that I make a coffee and work from home from 9am to 6pm. But I am always available on the phone for any emergency translations! After 6pm I go out with friends, go for a walk or go to the cinema. I always come home early! A normal work-life balance, basically!

What do you think are the greatest challenges of the translation industry nowadays?

The relationship between new language Technologies (LTs) and machine translation on the one hand and maintaining the quality of the final product on the other. The implications for pricing are another story!

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

I have been working as a translator for over 20 years; I’m old school! I have loved words since I learned to read.

What is your favourite book and what are you currently reading?

My favourite book is “Rayuela” by Julio Cortázar, and now I’m reading “La siliconización del mundo. La irresistible expansión del liberalismo digital” by Éric Sadin.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

I would advise them to read, to distinguish between knowledge and information and, obviously, to be up to date with the new tools.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

Professionalism and seriousness, but mostly friendliness and good vibes.

Thank you, Antonio! We really enjoy working with you!

SeproTec_Diploma Translator of the Month_January 2020

 

 

 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: December 2019!

febrero 5th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of December 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

Translators’ work is of vital importance in every translation company. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Anna Sałek, one of our most German and English into Polish translators!

Hi, Anna!

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

During my internship in the Polish Ministry of Justice I was asked to prepare a written translation into Polish for then pre-accession advisor. Surprisingly, the results were quite satisfactory and I realized that I’m genuinely enjoying this!

What do you start your work day with?

My typical day starts with checking e-mails, news of dailies and social media updates (the latter is an advantage of being a freelancer :)

If there is no hurry I try to run my errands before the rush begins. Everything depends on my commitments.

Do you have a fixed schedule for work, or do you usually finish your day when your work allows you?

I don’t have a fixed schedule (which at times has a negative influence on my personal life) but respecting deadlines is my top priority.

Do you have a life motto?

No pain no gain, no risk no fun :)

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

Interesting projects, well organized workflows and extremely helpful project managers.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

Trust yourself, be patient and do not rely on Machine Translation because it makes your mind lazy.

Thank you for your time, Anna, and congratulations! It’s a great pleasure to work with you. And enjoy your Sepro hoodie :)

We are pleased to continue with our series of interviews with SeproTec experts. This time we talk with our Head of Interpreting Department, Isabel Arroyo—so let’s go!

Isabel has been working in the company for almost 12 years and she heads the Public Services Interpreting Department.

- Hi Isabel! Thanks for booking time for us in your busy calendar – we know the last few months have really been busy for you! We would like to get to know you better, so let’s get started! Can you tell us how everything started?

12 years ago, I was hired as a manager when we began the interpreting services project for the National Police. It was the first time that this client had put the management of these services out to tender, and it was pretty chaotic. Back then, many of us entered the Department at the same time and, even though there was a lot of work, we had a great time. We learned an enormous amount. Slowly but surely, we began adding new clients and the Department started to take shape. In 2010, I was appointed coordinator, and since 2012, I’ve been the manager. I’m a Sepro veteran now!

- Did you always know you wanted to work in the industry?

To be honest, this job came up as soon as I finished my degree. Even though I specialized in translation and had always had teaching in mind, when I saw this job offer, I thought it was really attractive. Working in the translation and interpreting sector was always my first choice.

- Can you tell us what your role involves, how it fits into the wider language service industry?

Our job is not a common one in the labor market. Interpreting for the public services is relatively limited, but I have to say we handle some very different kinds of tasks. In my case, I have duties of all kinds, covering the supervision of all tasks concerning the Public Service Interpreting area, including preparing, reviewing, and approving price quotes and reports, supervising the databases, managing the team and the services, organizing training courses, contacting and visiting clients, presenting proposals and following up on quality plans, participating in the preparation of bids, etc. However, this project would not work without the great administrative team behind it, currently more than 40 people (coordinators, account executives, selection specialists and clerks) in the various offices (Las Rozas, Barcelona and Valencia). Every day we have to face a wide variety of challenges. I think that the fact that the team is so diverse (different nationalities, ages, educational backgrounds, etc.) makes it more complete. We learn a lot from one another because everyone contributes something to the service. To complete our tasks, we work closely with other departments such as Human Resources, Administration and Marketing & Sales. It is also very gratifying to know that all our work has a social impact, and that we work with and for people and are often able to come up with solutions for really complex situations.

- What is the most challenging aspect of your job?

The most challenging part of our job is making this sector more professional and making people acknowledge the value provided by interpreters. There is still a lot to do to get there. The first step is to raise awareness among the public institutions of how important it is. We also need to work on qualifications and improve the levels of service in general.

- SeproTec is a leader in translation and interpreting for public services. How is this different from providing services for non-public/ non-institutional clients?

From my standpoint, besides the obvious differences in the way people are hired, salaries and the types of services, one of the key aspects that makes our management different is the immediacy. Our team is operational 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and, generally, we have a two-hour margin from when the request is made to when the interpreter arrives at the site. Also, the range of languages is very wide, and we are obliged to provide a service in any of the official languages and dialects from practically anywhere. Among our latest requests have been languages such as Malayalam, Tibetan, Ilokano and Baluchi. It’s quite a challenge! I always say that our interpreters are true all-rounders because they have to cope with very different situations on a daily basis and do not always have information about the people they are going to assist. For example, often they don’t send us any information on the type of crime or documentation on the cases and so our interpreters might find themselves assisting anyone from a person arrested for petty theft to the parties involved in a complex tax evasion case in the courts.

As a general rule, the main method used is liaison or bilateral interpreting. However, some clients understand the role of the interpreter better than others, so they are not always helpful as regards timing and pauses or just in general. Maybe the ideal solution would be to provide all these services by way of simultaneous interpreting, but in practice this isn’t easy given the budgetary limitations to install technical equipment at every site and the number of professionals available in this discipline.

I feel strongly that much work remains to be done to raise awareness in the public services about the role of the interpreter.

- Do you agree that today’s society can be defined by multiculturalism and multilingualism?

It’s clear that migratory flows are having a very significant influence on the social context and therefore on our work. While, say, 12 years ago, there were a large number of requests for Eastern European languages, over the last few years, the war in Syria and the huge influx of people arriving on the coasts of Southern Europe in small boats have changed the situation. Also, yes, I believe that today’s society is more open to multiculturalism and multilingualism, and that there is a growing number of tools for communicating with people from anywhere in the world, but I also have to say that professionals are still needed to facilitate legal proceedings, as there are still cultural barriers that reduce the effectiveness of communication.

- Now and then we see some articles complaining about the externalization of this service to LSPs, mainly due to a lack of knowledge of their services. Will you please help us understand the difficulties of the service?

Although interpreters who pursue a public service career in many countries are still virtually unknown (sometimes interpreting is barely differentiated from translation), are not covered by specific industry regulations, and often aren’t taken into sufficient consideration, fortunately people are becoming more aware of the problems that this creates and the industry is working to change this situation. To start with, we need to remember that the Translation and Interpreting track at university is relatively new. The profession, however, has always existed. The logical tendency is for this field to become a true profession, and it is inevitable that during that process there will be all kinds of experiences.

For some years now, the Public Administration has been opting to outsource part of the Translation and Interpreting service. There are interpreters in place directly hired by the Administrations. However, because there are very few of them for the huge volume of work, and, therefore, few language combinations are available, and especially because there has been a rise in the number of requests for minority languages, the private sector is increasingly being used to cover the real demand for translation and interpreting services and the specific challenges each situation presents.

During our years of experience in the business, we have found employees in the industry who had never worked legally before joining us. Our interpreters comply with the confidentiality regulations and are hired in accordance with the labor legislation in force in the country or region where the service is performed, so their salaries can vary from one zone to another.

While this is always something that private enterprise has been criticized for, their rates reflect the maximum prices set by the Administrations in their tenders and, unfortunately, the economic situation has not been very favorable over the past few years. People also have a rather mistaken idea of how much the company earns. Many people take the maximum bid price as their point of reference, but you have to remember that a bid must be made and the price must include both the interpreting and the management of the service: the gross salary of the interpreter, Social Security, severance packages, vacations, administrative management, service 24 hours a day/365 days a year, selecting interpreters, travel and per diem costs, management tools, and other general expenses. In short, the profit margin is not nearly as large as it might appear at first glance.

Taking Spain as an example, SeproTec currently works with a monthly average of 1,000 interpreters who provide around 550 interpreting services daily for the courts and police. Approximately 350 of them have a permanent contract and, of these, 230 have a full-time contract.

Regarding our positive experience as interpreting service providers for the Public Administration, we can say that the volume of complaints or incidents reported is minimal compared with the volume of services rendered (less than 0.08% in 2018).

We are committed to defending and respecting our profession, collaborating with the Public Administration in a continuous process of renewal and a search for solutions that fit the needs as they arise. That is why it is crucial for private companies, associations, and the academic and professional fields to work together to strengthen and secure the future of public service interpreting.

- What languages are being demanded? We bet it must be a wide range…

So far this year we have received requests for about 120 different languages.

In the case of Spain for example, the languages most in demand have not changed much over the years: Arabic (33%), English (10%), and Romanian (10%), followed by French, Mandarin Chinese, Georgian, Russian, Urdu, Albanian and German (accounting for 28% between them). This year, for example, there has (fortunately!) only been one request for each of the following languages: Twi, Bissa, Chechnyan, Dyula, Gujarati, Ilokano, Kasonke, Oromo and K’iche’.

- Are we right in imagining that it’s a fast-paced work environment in which one day is never the same as another?

Indeed, one of the major characteristics of this job is that it is impossible to predict with any certainty what we are going to face each day. The only exception is at night when you watch the news or tune into the radio on the way to work in the morning and hear that a criminal group has been arrested, there has been a raid, or several boats have arrived… Then you know exactly what to expect! In general, winter is usually quieter than summer, but it all depends on who our clients are at that moment and on the Department’s specific situation.

- Do you have any amusing anecdotes to share with us?

Lots. I think we could write a book. Apart from some of the interpreters having strange names (as you can imagine, with so many different nationalities), often you don’t know if you’re going to come across a man or a woman on the other end of the phone. For example, when I was starting out, I had to call a person whose name was Issa. I was certain that it would be a woman, but when I met Issa in person, it turned out that he was a man who towered over me.

Civil servants can also create some really unlikely situations, and at times they have asked us for “hands-free” interpreters when they meant to say sign language interpreters, while at other times they don’t know how to specify the language and they ask us for interpreters of Belgian, Nigerian or Shi’ite… They get quite confused!

- And lastly… Imagine one day without: work, internet or phone calls… What would you do for this one day?

I think I’d prefer not to imagine it… It would be chaos!

SeproTec Translator of the Month: October 2019

diciembre 10th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the October winner of the 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

Translators’ work is of vital importance in every translation company. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Gaëlle Bordet, one of our most trusted Catalan/ Spanish into French translators!

SeproTec Translator of the Month_October 2019

Gaëlle, when did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

After a year as an Erasmus student in the Pompeu Fabra University, in Barcelona, I realized first that I didn’t want to leave Spain and then that Spanish, Catalan and English were my real passion. I needed to keep using on an everyday basis my languages and find a job that combined my passion and would be opened to the world. It was then an obvious choice for me to follow the translation and interpretation path.

What do you start your work day with?

Usually, I start my day with a huge cup of coffee, it’s like a peaceful moment before things get more interesting and busy. Then I start my computer and I can easily lose track of time translating. Hours fly very quickly when I am in front of my screen!

Do you have a fixed schedule for work, or do you usually finish your day when your work allows you?

Actually, I don’t really have a fixed schedule. In fact, I have two little girls and I found a balance between my job as a Mum and my job as a translator. I manage to adapt my schedule to be with them when they need me. However, if there is a lot of work to do (and usually there is!), for me, work must be done and I spent as much time as needed until it’s completely and satisfactory done. For me, respecting the deadlines is very important and if I must spend the night working, it doesn’t bother me.

Do you have a life motto?

I try every day to be thankful for every good thing that happens to me and my family. I think it’s very important to enjoy and appreciate every moment. My family is the most important thing in my life and they really are my driving force.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

I love my work with SeproTec. At the beginning, I didn’t want to do juridical translations: I actually thought it was quite boring! However, I wanted to gain experience in every translation filed and I started with SeproTec through a university friend who was working at the Barcelona agency. But little by little I started to appreciate more and more my job. Every project is a new world and a new story. It’s been my everyday life for 14 years now and I hope it will keep on this way.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

I think it would be that they will have to work hard and try a lot of translation field until they find their own one. There is a lot of hard competition in translation, nevertheless they must not give away their work and if they work with constancy and are reliable, I think their clients will recognise and respect it.

 

Merci, Gaëlle! It’s a real pleasure to have you in the Team! And ejnoy your Sepro hoodie – it will for sure keep you warm as the temperature in December drops!