Quality is communication and measurement

We are all aware that clients have different needs. The MT Department at SeproTec uses a measurement tool from TAUS, DQF, to deliver the right quality to our clients. This is how we reach client satisfaction.

At the TAUS Industry Leaders Forum, to be held in Girona next week, our MT Department will be setting the stage for the round table about Normalizing Quality Management.  Panelist will show the way they have integrated DQF in their CAT tools, their experience using DQF and also we will learn about the implementation of Quality standards in the industry.

It is a great opportunity to meet colleagues from the industry and share our different experiences on using DQF and some other quality measure tools.

See you in Girona!

 

Last January 30 and February 23 we had the chance to participate in two TAUS events.

The first was a round table in Vienna where we debated a variety of translation industry issues alongside other top professionals. At the round table, we were able to briefly share our experience and work methods for ensuring the quality of our machine translation and post-editing language services.

The second was a web seminar entitled “Quality is communication”. In the seminar, we went into detail about how we at SeproTec handle machine translation services, with and without post-editing, advising our customers on the best option for them based on their needs.

When we speak of machine translation services with or without post-editing what we are really talking about is different levels of quality. This is why it is essential to have good communication with our customers to ensure that they receive the product they need.

Quality is communication.

This is a statement that must always be at the forefront, especially with machine translation services, because, although these services have been around for quite some time now, only in the last few years has demand for them really taken off.

While machine translation is now commonplace in our day-to-day, it continues to be a great unknown and there are still some misgivings about it. This is why for us:

Quality is communication with the customer to establish their needs from the outset, so that we all know what the expectations are for the finished product and how to provide the advice that will ensure the customer gets the service they require. In our case, this means stand-alone machine translation, machine translation with fast post-editing, or machine translation with full post-editing.

Quality is internal communication: between teams (project managers, localizers and the machine translation team, among others), and with our partners, so that everyone knows exactly what product they must deliver, and what is expected of their work.

Thus, communication is and will continue to be essential. Whereas the machine translation engine is a work tool that we must develop and constantly improve, communication is the channel that makes it possible for all aspects of the collaboration between people, customers, managers and providers to be fruitful.

Machine Translation Department

 

Evento: Desayuno AERCE (Asociación Española de Profesionales de Compras)

Una mala traducción siempre tiene una consecuencia económica para la empresa, que puede incluso llegar a ser gravísima en algunos casos como es, por ejemplo, una mala traducción de una patente o de un contrato jurídico.
¿Hasta qué punto conoces la cualificación de los traductores encargados de tus traducciones? ¿Sabes lo que tu empresa invierte en traducción o si están pagando dos veces por traducir el mismo texto? ¿Cuánto tiempo dedican tus empleados a revisar traducciones? ¿Has pensado alguna vez que la categoría de traducción puedes llegar a ahorrar hasta un 14% mejorando incluso la calidad?
Esta jornada pretende ser formativa, analizaremos los conceptos clave para sacar el máximo rendimiento de la inversión en servicios lingüísticos, cómo se pueden optimizar procesos y gestionar recursos de forma eficiente.
PROGRAMA

  • 09:00 – 09:30 Acreditaciones y café. Bienvenida AERCE
  • 09:30 – 09:45 La traducción…. ¿es realmente una categoría con la que ahorrar? Miguel Angel Sevil, Director Comercial y de Marketing en Grupo Sepro
  • 09:45 – 10:15 Conceptos clave para optimizar la inversión en servicios lingüísticos. Ponente: Amparo Olivares, Head of Corporate Sales, Europe en SeproTec Multilingual Solutions
  • 10:15 – 10:45 Caso de Éxito. De la descentralización de las traducciones a una gestión global
  • 10:40 – 11:15 Ruegos y preguntas. Miguel Angel Sevil y Amparo Olivares

Fecha: Martes, 21 de febrero de 2017

Localización: Hotel Catalonia Plaza Mayor (Calle de Atocha, 36, 28012 Madrid)

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Desktop Publishing (DTP)

enero 20th, 2017 | Posted by admin in Localización | Traducción - (0 Comments)

In a world where digital art and virtual life are becoming increasingly important, keeping up-to-date in terms of technical knowledge is vital. At SeproTec we are well aware of this and work with all kinds of digital files. Our layout technicians are qualified professionals well-versed in the use of popular programs such as Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Flash, Adobe Framemaker, QuarkXpress, Autocad, and so on. They also possess the initiative and the inquisitive nature needed to take on the challenges that new designs and programs put in their path.

Our team of project managers and design professionals are trained to apply and use translation memories in the different translation projects involving these file formats. They thus help maintain consistency within the text and throughout the entire project with regular updates. The use of layout software and translation memories enables us to achieve a high-quality final product, with a professional design matching the original and adapted to the real needs of the target market.

The outcome of this process is a file that is identical to the original in its layout and content, but translated and localized to the language and culture requested by the client.

What is transcreation?

noviembre 17th, 2016 | Posted by admin in Localización | Traducción - (0 Comments)

 

Marketing and communication are disciplines that require more than just a basic translation service. When targeting a given market we must adapt the communication strategy to the culture and customs of the target audience. At SeproTec we know that it is not enough for messages to be understood – they also have to connect. Communication focuses on emotion and sentiment. That is why our team is backed by translators with expertise in different marketing disciplines.

Transcreation is a creative translation process in which the quality of the message is paramount, as is the effectiveness in reaching the target audience. SeproTec’s pioneering transcreation service involves translators, proofreaders, testers, creators and marketing and communication experts working together. This service is indispensable for reaching any market.

Happy International Translation Day

septiembre 30th, 2016 | Posted by admin in Traducción - (0 Comments)

International Translation Day is celebrated every year on 30 September on the feast of St. Jerome, the Bible translator who is considered the patron saint of translators. The celebrations have been promoted by FIT (the International Federation of Translators) ever since it was set up in 1953. In 1991 FIT launched the idea of an officially recognised International Translation Day to show solidarity of the worldwide translation community in an effort to promote the translation profession in different countries (not necessarily only in Christian ones). This is an opportunity to display pride in a profession that is becoming increasingly essential in the era of progressing globalisation.

Wikipedia

Globalization is here to stay. We are living the age of the Internet, which is tearing down old boundaries. Roughly 72% of millennials prefer to search for information and make their purchases on the net rather than going to a traditional brick and mortar establishment. This means they are just one click away from buying anything, anywhere in the world. This global and digital environment that companies are striving to compete in internationally poses the following challenge: How do I design my internationalization campaign in the different markets?

The advantages of internationalization for small and medium enterprises are clear: competing in different markets and multiplying their number of clients. But how to reach those markets?

The two most frequent options for entering a new market are translating or localizing our messages and careful brand communication. Translation could be defined as the act of expressing something in one language that has already been expressed in another, while localization is the act of translating a message bearing in mind the customs, idiosyncrasies and culture of the target market.

Both options have their advantages. On the one hand, translation is a form of internationalization irrespective of cultural differences. It allows us to create or keep up an image as a global and uniform brand while at the same time boosting brand awareness beyond our own borders. Localization, on the other hand, consists in adapting the message to the target market taking cultural differences into account, making it more specific to the needs and preferences of local consumer groups.

As you can see, the concept of translation has gradually evolved according to the market’s needs and the effects of globalization. Translation is no longer mere linguistic transfer; it is progressing into a transcultural communication model and an intrinsic part of the internationalization process. Translation and localization are both key elements when it comes to accurately and coherently conveying a company’s philosophy and identity in the international marketplace. The aim of localization is to be seen as a friendly and appealing company in any country or market.

In this computerized world, translation and localization play a strategic role in any company’s international development. It is no longer a case of translating our website as if it were a mere showcase for our virtual store – we need to take important factors into account, such as making content locally relevant, considering SEO placement or the desired positioning in each of the markets we are approaching. Translation companies such as SeproTec offer much more than language guidance, they also analyze the international market and social and cultural trends in order to cause the greatest impact in each target market. We all know that by translating our website into English, Chinese and Spanish we can reach 60% of Internet users worldwide, but it is also important to localize content in order to hold a competitive position in every market, project a local, familiar image, and feature among the top results on the main Internet search engines.

A localization company like SeproTec is not just made up of linguists – we have a multi-disciplinary team comprised of localization engineers, programmers, desktop publishers, editors, analysts, and experts in internationalization and transcultural marketing. In view of the sector’s progress, a recent study published by the US Department of Labor stated that translation will be one of the strongest growth professions between 2016 and 2020.

Local or global strategies?

Our experience tells us that the best strategy is one that combines global and local. This means tackling an internationalization process by landing in local markets equipped with the cultural and social advantages of a local competitor.

Internationalization and digital transformation are the two greatest challenges for small and medium enterprises when it comes to growing in size and productivity, but they also represent two huge opportunities on a global market that demands relevance, knowledge and immediacy.

Of course, translation and localization are not the only factors to consider when preparing an internationalization strategy, but they should be acknowledged as key elements to guide, support and complement that strategy. Backed by a strategic partner like SeproTec Multilingual Solutions, the market knows no bounds.

Are we shooting ourselves in the foot? This is one question that many translation professionals still ask when we talk about machine translation. While at SeproTec we have been using it for several years now, it’s undeniable that it is now that the use of this technology is starting to become widespread in all fields, not just in ours. It is clear that technology marches forward, whether we like it or not, and the best thing we can do is adapt.

Indeed, it is now, only recently, that we are casting aside the old debate of “machine translation, yes or no?” and instead beginning a new debate: “machine translation yes, but how?”

The use of machine translation in our personal lives is now accepted. Yet, how should we use translation engines professionally?

Machine translation engines today do not provide perfect results, so when we want results similar to those of human translation we need postediting. That is where we professionals come in.

From a translation professional’s perspective, machine translation is just another tool in our arsenal to help us be more productive in our work. We can and should use it for support, just as we use glossaries or translation memories.

There is no reason that machine translation has to replace translators, although it may transform what kind of work we do. It is undeniable: we must adapt. Our profession is once again experiencing a major shift.

This is a shift similar to the one we experienced when we went from typewriters to computers, or from fax machines to e-mail. Not to mention the revolution when computer-assisted translation tools arrived on the scene. These advances caused translation to evolve substantially and transformed the way we work.

If all of these changes have helped us improve and adapt to our new environment, why not use machine translation to further broaden the array of possibilities before us while working? It is true that we have to change again, relearn things and work a bit differently than the way to which we’ve become accustomed.

Let’s think about this positively, though: this is an advance, a new challenge in our professional careers, a new way of working that is taking us out of our comfort zone to make us better professionals.

Change is scary, that much is certain, and it is hard, too; but what about the satisfaction of successfully adapting?

So let’s check out the advice for facing the changes in our Production Department and see machine translation for what it is: a new tool.

María Illescas

Project Manager