The prestigious independent consulting firm Common Sense Advisory has once again prepared its annual ranking of the most important companies in the world in the translation and interpreting industry, with the participation of more than 1,000 companies from across the globe. With over 150 million words translated last year, an average of 350 daily interpreting sessions, and over 900 clients around the world, SeproTec Multilingual Solutions has consolidated its position as one of the leading companies in the industry.
The multinational translation and interpreting company, headquartered in Spain, has undergone dramatic growth in recent years. Some months ago, SeproTec announced the opening of a new production center in Austin, Texas, an initiative that forms part of its plan for international expansion. The goal, according to Juan Julián León, the company’s CEO, is to “consolidate a key strategic market and increase the company’s production capacity with the large contracts signed in the USA in recent years.”
This is not the only news, as a few weeks ago SeproTec announced its acquisition of lidolang specialist translations, which León calls “one of Eastern Europe’s leading localization companies, with the greatest growth potential.” In addition to improving the company’s production capacity, this purchase will also broaden its synergies due to the vertical integration of its production processes; its geographical coverage, which makes it possible to offer a more localized service all over the continent; its portfolio of languages; and its expansion into the strategic international markets in which lidolang is already well positioned.
Since the publication of the latest ranking, SeproTec has maintained its position in spite of strong investment in international expansion, which has allowed SeproTec to compete in a larger number of markets with the level of quality that has always distinguished the company.
For León, “This is recognition for the work and effort of all our team and a sign that our commitment to internationalization is allowing us to grow in the large international markets. Our challenge now is to continue growing in order to become closer to our clients and expand our portfolio of multilingual solutions.”
SeproTec Multilingual Solutions is a company with over 25 years of experience in the industry, and has developed a wide range of services that help different companies and institutions carry out their international communication without having to worry about language-related issues. It operates in 14 countries and has over 400 employees.

The work of the purchasing department has become a key factor in improving a company’s bottom line. If a company aspires to excellence, its purchases must reflect this by matching its real needs. For this reason, and with the commitment of helping the different purchasing department professionals understand the advantages of a global service that covers all the multilingual needs of a company (translation, interpreting, localization, etc.), SeproTec is sponsoring the 19th Purchasing Professionals Congress, which will be held at the Teatro Goya in Madrid on May 25 and 26.

The company’s stand will showcase the most innovative services in the translation and interpreting industry, such as software and website localization, multi-language digital content management, plus other services designed to help companies become truly international.

This event has become the leading discussion and networking forum for professionals in this field. Executives from large corporations, purchasing managers from small and medium-sized businesses, and other professionals with links to purchasing, will pass on their experience on the latest topics of interest to all purchasers, so that the attendees can take back to their organizations new innovative, value-creating models and tools.

SeproTec’s sponsorship of the 19th Purchasing Professionals Congress is further evidence of the company’s commitment to supporting all initiatives that promote the growth of the sector and contribute to the development of a global market.

CHANGE MANAGEMENT AND ITS PHASES

marzo 15th, 2016 | Posted by admin in SeproTec - (0 Comments)

It is innate to human nature that all of us should find it difficult to make and accept a change; some more than others, but everyone finds it an effort to make a change.

Society is obliged to adapt to voluntary and involuntary changes, which are either imposed on us or we impose on ourselves to move forward. The success or failure of a change depends on two key factors: time and the different phases. At the end of the last phase, a new change is always started.

Change is a cycle of continuous improvement in which the only stability lies in overcoming its different phases:

Phase 1: Analyze the problem. All changes start with a problem, a crisis or something which is not going well. It doesn’t matter whether this problem is large or small; if something distorts or prevents us from advancing, it has to be changed.

Phase 2: Search for a solution. This may be one of the most creative and worrying phases of the cycle, but it is decisive. Mistakes may be made in finding a solution. In either case, if we make a mistake there is no need to worry; we can always go back to phase 1.

Phase 3: Search for a leader. Alexander the Great, Steve Jobs and Luke Skywalker. They were all brave leaders who drove large changes, even in fiction. However, they didn’t manage this overnight and they also had their failures along the way. But their determination, time and their completion of the different phases helped them reach their goal.

Phase 4: Communicate the vision. Every leader needs a vision; in other words, they need to know where they are going and what they want to achieve. Having a clear idea and knowing what is to be achieved is an essential condition in a leader.

Phase 5: Delegate and motivate. In addition to knowing where they are going, what the goal is and the desired end result, leaders must have strong support behind them to help them carry on come hell or high water.

Phase 6: Lead to victory. Alexander the Great had no easy task and found many obstacles on his way: disease, plagues, technical problems. Anything can happen and undermine our effort. We have to assume that all obstacles are part of the path that we have to follow.

Phase 7: Reward and disseminate. Having achieved our objective, it has to be celebrated and all of those surrounding us must be included in the success because we have all collaborated to achieve it.

Phase 8: Secure the change. Intrinsically, when the change is established we are analyzing both the benefits of the change and opening the doors to new improvements. So a new cycle is beginning which starts at Phase 1: analyzing a new problem and thus maintaining the cycle of continuous improvement.

Therefore, by setting goals, by establishing phases and through determination, the Mediterranean was conquered, the Apple Empire was conceived and the Death Star was destroyed. Let’s not be frightened of change and move forward in harmony to conquer everything we propose.

Production department.

Lina is a Spanish woman. That is clear, among other things, from her place of birth: Cádiz. What I’m not entirely clear on after our conversation is where her heart lies, divided as it is between Spain, her country of birth, and Syria, her family’s home.

It is one o’clock in the afternoon and we are meeting with one of our Arabic interpreters. We want to understand the real situation faced by Syrian refugees and how the work of interpreters can help in an international conflict like this one. After a few minutes of chit-chat, Lina begins the interview with a devastating statement. “I’ve had the misfortune of experiencing first-hand the flight from Syria,” she says. “The stampede of my own family.” Lina, you see, though she was born in Spain, is the daughter of Syrians who have had to escape from their own home. Her father came to Spain very young, and in circumstances far removed from today’s, to study medicine. “He was surprised back then by Spain’s immense cultural and industrial backwardness,” she muses. The irony of life.

Lina has lived her whole life in Spain, but she has also spent long periods of time in Syria. “The last few summers that I was in Syria you practically couldn’t tell whether you were in Europe or a Middle Eastern country. Its ambiance, its restaurants and terraces, made you think you were in a modern country.” She spent those summers with her cousins, the same cousins who left the country without a return ticket some months ago. “My cousin was cooking and his wife was painting her nails when a bomb exploded a few meters from their house.” One anguished glance was all it took for them to realize that their life in Syria had just ended. “They had to flee with nothing but the clothes on their backs. They didn’t even have time to prepare a small suitcase.” I tell Lina that I cannot imagine how terrible it must be to leave everything you have behind, or the fear of fleeing into the unknown. Just a look at some of the chilling images we’ve all seen by now can give us an idea of what that must be like. “The worst part is not what they do to you, it’s what you see them do to your family,” she tells me in one of the most painful parts of the interview.

She recounts horrible stories of the moment that her family arrived at Bodrum, Turkey. “There my family experienced things that they will never be able to forget. Fights, insults, humiliations…” Everything changed, though, when they came to Germany. “The welcome the Germans have given us has been fantastic. Coming to Germany meant having hope again.” Now it is time to think about the future. Lina’s cousins are between 25 and 40 years old. “The ones with children see this as an opportunity for their families. They are all dreaming of a European future.” The hardest part, though, is listening to the elders. “Not a day goes by that my grandmother doesn’t ask when she will return home.”

Lina speaks of her profession with a gleam of pride in her eyes. “I think that we interpreters have a lot to offer in this terrible conflict.” Although she has been interpreting for many different clients for over five years now, she is especially fond of her work for the Spanish Asylum and Refugee Office. “I’ve experienced moments I’ll never forget while interpreting. The tears and hugs from compatriots who hear your voice for the first time. The look on the face of a child who hears your accent and is transported back to the warmth of his hometown.” A child who, incidentally, Lina would run into again some years later. “He must have been about 18 years old then and he leapt toward me to give me a hug. He spoke perfect Spanish and was in the company of a group of Spanish friends. His life and hope were already here with us.“

Lina studied Translation and Interpreting at the Complutense University of Madrid. “I knew that I wanted to study Translation and Interpreting when I was asked, through a contact at the Syrian embassy, to accompany a Syrian music band on an official visit to Granada where the King and Queen of Spain and Bashar al Assad were going to be present.” Lina had to interpret for the musicians who did not speak Spanish. “I loved the experience. I loved traveling, being surrounded by people and feeling helpful by using the language.” After studying Translation and Interpreting she traveled to Syria to study classical Arabic at the University of Damascus. “There I also did translation from French to classical Arabic, but my passion was still interpreting.” That’s why, not long after, Lina returned to Spain and began her career as an interpreter. “Feeling that you’re helping people, helping your own compatriots with something as human as communicating, makes you feel accomplished, both as a professional and as a person.”

Thank you so much, Lina, for this moving interview and allow us to wish you and yours all the best in this new stage of your lives.

Warmly,

The SeproTec team.