SeproTec celebrating International Project Management Day!

noviembre 7th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | PM | SeproTec from the inside - (Comentarios desactivados)

Superheroes in real life: SeproTec’s project managers!

PM Day 2019 at SeproTec

We won’t talk about what you all know already—who the translation project managers are and what they do. We know their role is to coordinate the translation process, from the first customer inquiry to delivery of the final files—no matter how the situation develops, the client must get a properly completed translation! In the meantime, this is all about the 50 other small tasks. Easy peasy? We just want to mention a few characteristics that our project managers possess and without which—well—things could look quite a bit different! Making hard decisions, taking responsibility and thinking outside the box are essential to being a successful project manager.

According to the Project Management Institute: “Project management is the application of knowledge, skills, and techniques to execute projects effectively and efficiently. It’s a strategic competency for organizations, enabling them to tie project results to business goals—and thus, better compete in their markets.”

In other words…

It’s about being perfectly organized and keeping track of all the projects happening at their different stages.

It’s about having a deep knowledge and a big picture view of each project.

It’s about supporting both the client and the translator—which means project managers should be diplomats too! Without effective communication with both parties, the project manager could not possibly predict the risks and find solutions to the various challenges that may arise along the way.

It’s about being client service-oriented—it’s also about relationship building: earning a client’s trust and ensuring that the client always has a single point of contact, being detail-minded (terminology and style guidelines!), possessing excellent verbal and written communication skills in multiple languages—well that goes without saying—and being deadline-driven and proactive.

At SeproTec, project managers are familiar with both the translation and proofreading processes as well as quality standards. They can—at any moment—redistribute a task, agree on something with the client, or find a way out of an extraordinary situation.

This is how the project managers are our everyday superheroes!

We are pleased to introduce you to a new series of interviews with SeproTec experts. The first interview in the series is with our Head of Vendor Management, Estrella Ruiz—so let’s go!

Estrella Ruiz, Head of Vendor Management at SeproTec, handles the VM Team, recruiting, and the onboarding of translation providers (vendors). We would like to understand Estrella’s role better, so let’s get started!

- Can you tell us how it all began?

Well, ever since I can remember I have been fascinated by languages, especially English, so it was clear to me that my future professional career would be one related to languages.

First, I studied for a college degree in Tourism and Business Activities. After a few internships and temporary positions in companies within the tourism sector (travel agencies and hotels), I realized this was not really my thing. I started studying for another degree in Translation and Interpreting at the University of Granada in Spain.

What I really wanted was to reach a high level of language proficiency in English. I knew that the best way was moving to an English-speaking country, so I decided to spend my Erasmus year in Swansea (Wales, UK). I loved it there, so much that I stayed there for the next five years.

I joined a Welsh translation company. That is where my professional career in translation started, and where I realized how much I liked the translation industry. My time there was not only crucial for my career development, but also for my personal growth.

Five years later in 2014, I decided it was time to move back to Spain. “It is not the most convenient time!”—everyone was warning me because of the crisis going on in Spain at that time.

I’m so glad I didn’t listen because days after my return I was lucky enough to be invited to an interview at SeproTec and was offered a Vendor Manager position. Almost six years have passed since then… (OMG!)  In my personal life, that was the year I met my current life partner and the father of my little child.

Coming back to Spain was definitely a good decision—or destiny. :)

- Did you always know you wanted to work in the industry?

It would make a good impression if I said it was always my dream to work here, but the honest answer is “no”. The truth is that I didn’t have much of an idea about what working in the translation industry involved until I got my first job in translation in the UK.

It was only then I decided on my career path, and all I know today is what I have been learning—and keep on learning—over the last nine years since I have been working in the sector.

Having said that, I think some translation/language universities lack in providing proper counseling and guidance for students regarding the translation business and the wide range of translation-related professions that they can focus their careers on (Project Coordinator, Vendor Manager, etc.), apart from just being a freelance translator. But I digress—sorry :)

- Can you tell us what your role involves, and how it fits into the wider language service industry?

The industry is extremely varied when it comes to those who we call our ‘resources’. Our resources are made up of linguists, DTP experts, posteditors, developers, localization engineers, subtitlers, transcreators, content writers, copywriters, and voice-over talents. These providers can be freelancers, teams, or companies of varying sizes.

I believe there is a serious lack of awareness regarding the Vendor Manager’s role.

Some people—incorrectly—think that our work is to review résumés and register resources in the database (such an easy job, and boring, by the way). However, vendor management is so much more than a language resource recruiter.

Behind every single resource (out of the six thousand resources available today in SeproTec’s  database), there is a Vendor Manager who: recruited him/her, checked his/her skills and expertise, verified qualifications and certifications, ran a specialized translation test and vetting process according to a particular subject, negotiated rates and collaboration conditions, wrote tens of emails and made phone calls, thought about what projects would suit him/her best, decided on what to do if certain projects are not a good fit, constantly updated, closely monitored and kept track of his/her job evaluations and the quality of the jobs completed, renegotiated rates, ensured they felt comfortable with their workload, addressed any issues that arose and took corrective actions when needed, actively managed our database, kept records up to date, and continuously ensured that our suppliers felt happy working with us, coordinated with other departments (Production, Sales, Administration, Marketing) on benchmarking activities or helping to decide the right pricing structure for a new service, all to maximize efficiency within the company and ensure quality.

In addition, I really enjoy training new colleagues for the job, and helping them understand the importance of the outcome of our jobs within the company. I’m very proud of each and every professional who has worked in or today belongs to this department.

- What is the most challenging aspect of your job?

Looking at the big picture. A Vendor Manager’s main role is to ensure that all our project managers have peace of mind because they know that, no matter the demands of the clients (urgent projects, unusual language combination, specific topics, high volumes, etc.), they have access to the most qualified and suitable vendor for that job. When it’s an obscure subject, an unusual language combination, or super tight deadlines, searching for the right supplier may feel like trying to find a needle in a haystack. It is a huge and yet very fulfilling challenge!

Another very challenging VM duty is to grow the active vendors database. The company needs to have a pool of vendors actively cooperating. Project Managers, on the other hand, like all humans, would assign projects to the vendors they know they can trust and who will deliver on time, so they can move on to the next project as quickly as possible. So, here we find a paradoxical situation of two business goals that are opposed to each other. If the company always uses the same vendors, the pool of vendors actively cooperating with the company doesn’t grow. When workload increases and we need to engage more vendors, those vendors not included in the preferred pool might be no longer interested in cooperation, which is a pity.

Big cooperation and coordination efforts between Production and Vendor Management is vital to overcoming such challenges and to consolidating the company’s database.

- We can see your department has an important role, similar to that of purchasing departments. Are your KPIs based merely on cost reduction?

Not at all. Although cost reduction is important, VM KPIs are focused on monitoring quality and expanding and maintaining the supplier database. There are multiple reasons:

If our KPIs were solely based on profitability, we would be giving preference to hiring cheaper vendors and meeting profitability goals over quality assurance. That’s the main one.

However, we should be aware that cheaper rates are not always linked to lower quality, and vice versa, vendors with most expensive rates are not necessary the most qualified ones.

Also, it’s important to mention the existing unfair competition in the industry. Professional freelance translators are sometimes forced to compete against inexperienced students and unskilled vendors who offer ridiculously low rates and manage to enter the market, aided by incompetent translation agencies with no commitment to quality that look for the cheapest option on the market regardless of the quality of the work, and offer the same low rates to end customers.

This situation is quite damaging to us all—professional freelancers, companies and clients alike—and sometimes makes it difficult to identify the actual market rates for a professional, high-quality translation service. But that´s what the VMs are here for!

In summary, although rates are obviously taken into consideration, our main KPIs are related to quality management. While working on improving quality, we reduce costs at the same time by following the right approach when it comes to using the right tools and CAT tool technology, and by reducing risks of potential issues and the associated costs and penalties.

- Is it always a matter of trust, or do you evaluate the translators on a regular basis?

Trust must always be earned. We have rigorous quality control procedures that are well defined and thoroughly implemented.

All our linguists go through a pre-selection and vetting process before they can start collaborating with us. Once pre-selected, potential collaborators go through a probationary period. It is time for them to prove that they are competent and reliable, to win the trust of the Project Managers, and vice versa, by delivering high-quality work and—what is even more important and difficult—consistently maintaining such quality over time. If they pass the trial period with satisfactory results, they receive “Active status” in our database. Their performance and quality are still evaluated and tracked on a regular basis in coordination with our Production and Quality departments.

Our vendors also need to be trained to become familiar with the specific demands and style requirements of our clients. Feedback is therefore quite important, both positive and negative criticism must be conveyed so they can learn. This is a way of learning how a true professional translator reacts as well.

But “translation is not a science but an exact art” (Steiner, 1975) [love it :) ]

As a result, there are frequent disagreements over translation strategies due to differences in style or subjective preferences, where our PMs have the difficult role of serving as mediators so that the most effective solution can be sought.

Also, sometimes, our quality standards are not met. As all humans do, bad choices are made and quality issues may arise.

Each case is thoroughly analyzed and assessed by the PM and—when it is required—it is escalated to the VM team, who applies the most appropriate corrective action depending on the severity of the issue, and ensures that it will never happen again.

Quality is always a must. We and our providers should always remember that the final goal is to keep our customers happy by delivering excellent quality on time.

- You mentioned the famous human factor; how do you find the best service providers?

As I see it, it’s very simple: a translation company cannot exist without linguistic providers. They are  the epicenter of the whole process, and they are our allies in the company’s successful predominance in the translation industry.

However, beyond résumés, credentials and competitive rates, we look for candidates who are honest and authentic.

In addition to technical knowledge, qualifications and translation skills that are constantly evaluated, as explained in the last question, we also very much value the professionalism, responsiveness, communication skills and reliability of our collaborators. We like to work with professionals who are easy to communicate and work with, who pay attention to details, who strictly meet our delivery deadlines and follow our instructions correctly, who are cooperative, motivated to work with us and passionate about what they do.

An important part of a Vendor Manager´s role is to keep such motivation going and make sure our vendors feel happy and comfortable working with us by maintaining strong and positive relationships.

In addition, we deal with vendors from all over the world, and we need to learn that different cultures require different styles of relationship management (localized relationships ;) )

In this sense, Vendor Managers act as an extension of the Human Resources department, as HR experts charged with making connections and building positive relationships with the part of the business that matters most: the people.

- Searching for new resources: when do you come into the picture?

We are continuously expanding the network of translation professionals.

When we receive an order for, let’s say, an unusual language combination, and the resources in our database are limited, then PM might ask us to launch an external search and find suitable linguists— meeting the specific requirements for that particular project. These are what we call “active” searches, which cover our ongoing daily needs.

The VM also works on “potential” searches, which are just as important as the active ones and are based on the company’s future needs and work forecasts.

The company’s needs, customers and customer demands are continuously changing, and a Vendor Manager needs to be familiar with the dynamic character of the translation industry.

We work alongside the Production and Sales teams to identify the company’s future needs for new vendors, i.e. new language combinations, new subject areas, text typologies, new linguistic services, and then ask ourselves: 1) do we have enough linguistic resources in our database to cover these specific needs? 2) at what cost?

Our searches should be proactive and constant, so that we are always ready to respond to any request that comes out of the blue with the most competitive resources.

- We all agree that language resources are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. It’s what we always say when we announce a winner of the “Translator of the Month” event at SeproTec. By the way, it was your department’s idea to implement that plan! That was a great idea!

For me, taking the corresponding corrective actions when quality is not as expected is as important as those taken when quality is outstanding.

Again, here is where the importance of supplier relationship management comes up.

I have developed a deep respect and admiration for translators, and I think we should show our suppliers that we value their work and professionalism and thank them for their dedication to us over the years.

That is the goal behind the “Translator of the Month” event, which at the same time, is a responsibility shared with other departments—such as Administration—by ensuring prompt payments, or PM teams through the friendly and professional communication that they maintain with our resources.

The good news is that we seem to be succeeding in this task, in view of the positive feedback that our collaborators have published in certain popular translation portals, which I find very rewarding.

- What do you like most about working at SeproTec?

No doubt it’s the friendly working environment and the excellent group of very professional people working here.

- And… imagine a day without work, the internet, phone calls… What would you do for this one day?

I can imagine it outside of Madrid, right? So, I would be on some unknown beach on the southern coast. I’d start my day by going for a run early in the morning, joining my family for breakfast, and spending all morning long playing with my child, swimming, and building sandcastles for him to  destroy later. For lunch, I’d have shrimp paella, and a couple of ice-cold beers with my boyfriend, followed by the obligatory “siesta”, of course. In the evening I’d go to the movie theater to see the new “The Lion King” movie—I can’t wait to watch it!. Then we’d watch the sun set somewhere nice by the beach with a huge lemon ice-cream. All with no work, no internet, and no phone. Perfect!
You can tell I need a vacation!

We would certainly sign up for your perfect day! Thank you so much for your time, Estrella. It’s been a pleasure to get to know you better and thank you for doing such a consistently great job!

SeproTec among Top 20 Global Interpreting Leaders!

septiembre 6th, 2019 | Posted by admin in conferences | Did you know...? | Interpretación | Rankings - (Comentarios desactivados)

We have a pleasure to inform you that SeproTec has been ranked #16 in the Nimdzi Interpreting Index which includes a ranking of the largest players in the business, an estimated size of the global interpreting market, and an overview of its current state.

SeproTec was a pionieer in offering interpreting for conferences when we launched the service in 1989.

30 years after we are among the global leaders!

The vital role of experts in content translation

septiembre 5th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | SeproTec | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Nowadays we live in a world in which languages are really important, especially when working with different companies. Thanks to globalization, foreign languages are now part of our everyday lives. It is no less important, however, that when we come to commercial agreements with other countries we understand not just their language but also the idiomatic rules that apply to the business world. This is often the key to avoiding sticky situations.

The importance of understanding other countries’ business rules

In these cases, it is very useful to work with local experts in the industry, because this is the only way to ensure that we fully and clearly understand a company’s rules and regulations. Indeed, to reach commercial agreements it is indispensable to understand the company, but also the company’s culture and, of course, the way it works internally. This is ideal if we decide to work with your company for awhile, or if we receive employees from your company into ours.

And it is also why experts in content translation are becoming increasingly vital. They are specialists with industry-specific knowledge, not translators as such, but rather staff specialized in the fields of engineering, technology, medicine, pharmacology, law and other fields. With these experts, we are ensuring total understanding between both companies and that the deal is going to be perfectly sealed, with full knowledge of what each company is buying and selling.

Why use specialized translators?

It’s not the same to have translators in a company as people specialized in different subjects, such as we offer at SeproTec, because we know that the success of these negotiations depends on professionals who are proficient in other languages and also have specific knowledge of certain subjects.

It is important that these professionals be specialized in the subject matter, as this ensures they will know the terminology specific to each field of work, as well as how these fields operate, the price of certain services, or even the way other companies work. Plus, with these specialized translators, communication will be more fluid and will improve trust between both parties, as both will be able to rest assured that their business is being handled well.

Focusing on knowledgeable translation

Having consultants specialized in translation but oriented toward the labor market is the best solution for coming to commercial agreements. Indeed, at SeproTec, we have seen that this is a growing trend.  Companies are now aware that these professional experts are the perfect agent for interacting with businesses and companies from other countries and regions and thus successfully closing commercial agreements.

 

ISO 17100:2015 quality standard for translation services

mayo 7th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

Based on customer demand, language service providers (LSPs) offer different levels of service but only certified agencies are able to offer the highest level of language service provision with regard to quality assurance (QA) in the marketplace. Keep on reading this post to learn more about professional translation standards, if you are in need of language services that meet the ISO 17100 quality standard.

The ISO 17100:2015 quality standard for translation services, published by the International Organization for Standardization, defines the certification requirements for the different aspects involved in the provision of translation services, namely, human and technological resources, project registration, quality management, the legal framework for the procedure, added-value services and, last but not least, definition of the various terms.

The standard gives buyers assurance over the entire work process and the steps involved in translation and review, requiring translation agencies to comply with both management and translation processes and guidelines.

The fine tradition of training and professional excellence. To achieve this, certain parameters must be met that demonstrate the professional standard of the service by checking all the processes and technical details for a project while respecting and adhering to confidentiality agreements at the same time. So, let’s have a detailed look at these requirements.

ISO 17100 Requisites and Requirements

The ISO 17100 international standard establishes the skills and qualifications necessary for those involved in a project and for all aspects of the translation process:

– Resources. The translation agency must have a documented workflow process to manage any translation project as optimally as possible. This process must cover three phases: control, supervision and validation before final delivery to the customer.

– Pre-production. A preliminary task that includes the analysis of the documents to be translated, the subject matter, the specific vocabulary required and project delivery deadlines. This part enables us to conduct a feasibility study by perfectly matching the linguistic specification and drawing up the best quote for the customer.

– Mother tongue translators. The translation process, validated by the ISO 17100 standard, gives buyers assurance that the work has been completed by a professional translator into his/her native language, while also being able to count on a reviewer of the former’s work, who also shares this same mother tongue.

– Post-production. This is the tightest control level, where an agency will stress the importance of interaction with the customer and may propose various linguistic preferences, evaluate the translation, consider customer comments and deal with possible complaints.  Customer satisfaction is an essential quality requirement in any translation or review process.

Professional Skills of the Translator and Reviewer

The ISO 17100 standard makes it obligatory for professionals to meet at least one of the following criteria:

– Have a diploma in translation/interpretation following college graduation with a bachelor’s degree.

– Have a recognized college degree.

– Have a college degree in a language or related field with at least two years of dedicated experience in translation work.

– Have worked at least five years as a professional translator.

SeproTec’s requirements go even beyond these criteria. Our translators are native speakers of the target language, and they always possess appropriate knowledge and experience regarding the subject matter of the assigned project. Furthermore, they are also familiar with modern CAT tools.

Barrier-free communication. SeproTec is an ISO 17100:2015 quality certified agency that provides services in over 750 language combinations. Pick up the phone, call us and see how well we will understand one another!

English (and Spanish) Language Day 2019

abril 23rd, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

On 19 February 2010, the Department of Public Information of the United Nations approved the decision to celebrate the 23rd of April as English Language Day throughout the organization.

 

As you can well imagine, this was no random choice, but almost coincides with the birthday (April 26th) of the most important writer in the English language, and indeed one of greatest in the history of world literature: William Shakespeare.

The UN has established six official working languages within the organization: Chinese, Arabic, French, Russian, Spanish and English, each of which has been designated its own Language Day to promote cultural diversity.

Though it may strike some as odd, the 23rd of April is also Spanish Language Day, in honor of another universal author dubbed by some as the Prince of Wits: Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra.

The dissemination of culture, the increase in the level of awareness and knowledge of diversity in different civilizations and respect for history are made manifest by the common use of the different official UN languages.

To be, or not to be, that is the question

Indeed, the role the UN plays in promoting multilingualism worldwide is a key factor in communication between continents and countries alike. What is more, it is perhaps the most effective way of showcasing cultural diversity before all of them.

If you stop and think about it, multilingualism encourages tolerance and makes it possible to increase the efficiency of work in the organization by means of a wider and more effective active participation of all its members.

French and, particularly, English are the most common working languages in the United Nations Secretariat and those used in the course of daily professional exchanges.

Multilingualism at the United Nations

The Department for General Assembly and Conference Management is in charge of encouraging dialog and specific multilingual cooperation among UN Member States, different international organizations, inter-governmental bodies and international civil society.

Through its Department of Public Information, the UN informs and reports to the media while adhering to the highest multilingual standards. Press, radio, television and, especially, the Internet readily attest to the fact that the institution is the world’s number one multilingual organization.

Even though English may be the working language of the UN, in resolution 71/328 on multilingualism the General Assembly gives the Secretary-General a broad mandate to mainstream the most commonly used languages in a coordinated, consistent and coherent approach throughout all departments and to accept innovative proposals that promote an institutional culture that is conducive to multilingualism.

As you can see, the United Nations plays an important role in promoting multilingualism, an essential factor in bringing peoples together.

Challenges of intercultural communication

abril 2nd, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | International | Localización | Marketing | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

Globalization gives you the opportunity to expand your business into other countries and to find and explore new markets in which to sell your products or services. Yet the overall global context does not mean that countries are giving up their cultural roots. When taking your brand into a country you don’t know, transcreation is the way to go. Transcreation means being aware of intercultural differences and analyzing them so as to adapt your communication to a different culture.

‘Transcreation goes beyond creative translation,’ says transcreation expert from Transcreat, agency with which SeproTec workd on a regular basis,

‘ You should forget old translation concepts of fidelity and transparency. Transcreation is about recreation. You should read an original and then forget its wording but keep in mind its meaning. When you have forgotten how this meaning was described in the original, you will be able to recreate it into another language based on the context, culture and idiosyncrasies of the people who are going to read your work.’

Expand your communication possibilities 

When you want to move your business to other countries, you find yourself having to make a huge marketing effort to achieve the desired levels of success. Globalization provides you with a world of business opportunities, but the fact that the world has never been more connected doesn’t mean the end of cultural and communication barriers between cultures.


What must you do to establish your business in a new country?

It has been shown that consumers are put off by poorly translated websites and tend not to trust them. This occurs with sites with text that is full of spelling mistakes, poorly translated or simply poorly written. This is not the only important aspect, though.

Have your website well translated and adapt it to your target market if you want to be successful

If you really want to expand your brand and increase your sales in a new country, having your website well translated is not enough.

- Adapt all your messages, your communication style and your campaigns to adjust them not only to a new language, but also to a new culture.

- Recruit native staff to ensure that your strategies are best suited to the values and characteristics that define your new audience.

A new communication structure

All too often, when we talk about starting to sell in another country, the first and only thing that comes to mind is translating our website, but this is by no means the only thing you are going to have to adapt.

- New country is synonymous with new bureaucracy and with building relationships with suppliers and distributors based there.

- If you have to change currencies, the best thing to do is review your entire pricing policy. Every culture has its own way of understanding prices and this is no trivial matter. Get in contact with experts if you feel unsure.

- Specific characteristics can also influence the design of your website, the colors used and even the type of people who appear in your visuals, videos and advertising spots.

Transcreation shows itself to be the most effective strategy. If you want to be successful, make sure you don’t focus all your effort just on a good translation, but also consider all the dimensions that influence your communications in the new country.
‘As the world we live in becomes more globalized, digital and diversified, and markets continue to broaden, new challenges arise,’ adds Arcelino Monteiro, one of our most trusted and experienced transcreation experts, ‘Never before has a service been in such high demand and as necessary and urgent as it is today: transcreation, a powerful globalization tool that takes into account heritage, local values, beliefs and cultures aspects to convey a message in a way that appeals to a different culture, reaching their hearts and minds and evoking emotions.’

According to Arcelino, main challenges when working on a transcreation project are:

• Puns;

• Idioms;

• Proverbs;

• Slogans;

and character limits (when they are applied).

SeproTec’s pioneering transcreation service involves translators, proofreaders, testers, creators and marketing and communication experts working together. This service is indispensable for reaching any market.

Translating a tweet: the best way to do it

marzo 19th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Did you know...? | International | Marketing | Social media - (Comentarios desactivados)

One of the main characteristics of the social media platform Twitter is that it has a character limit for each of the messages you want to publish, the famous 280 characters.

You have to express whatever it is you are thinking in that precise moment or convey it in an understandable way within that limit. By the way, increasing the character limit in Twitter posts from 140 to 280 characters was, according to many experts, one of the most important changes in PR and marketing in 2018.

Longer tweets give you an opportunity to get more content.

Tweet translation

Because of the social media platform’s character restriction, translation is a real challenge in certain language combinations. For example, from Spanish to English it is usually not that complicated as it has a simple structure that usually takes up less space. On the other hand, a translation into German can be quite complicated as it has longer words.

How to translate with space limits

This is a question that pertains not only to social media, but also to subtitling. The best approach is to take a number of factors into account:

- The maximum number of characters in each message. This may seem obvious, but you must take this into account because otherwise the message might not be published.

- The linguistic characteristics of the target language. To continue with the last example, if you know that German usually takes up more space then you need to come up with different solutions to successfully convey the same message as in the original language. In this case we’re talking about adaptation.

- The essence of the message you wish to convey. If you want to translate a publication originally written in English into German, the best thing you can do is identify the main gist of the message. If you are clear on what you are trying to convey, you can create a translation that, while not saying it in the same way, does convey the same idea.

- The marketing structure of the target language. You need to see the social media platform Twitter as just another marketing tool among the many that exist. This complicates everything a bit because, while also successfully conserving the original message’s meaning in the translation without exceeding the medium’s character limit, you must also choose the right terms to sell the product being marketed.

- Who is the intended recipient. In addition to all of the aforesaid, you must always be aware of who the intended recipient of the message is. This way you can adapt the tone and the terms used in the translation to catch their attention.

The limited number of characters we can use on Twitter may seem like a limitation, however a short message format allows you to share information very quickly. This is what distinguishes Twitter. Twitter users respond quickly to emerging information, and therefore, you cannot allow yourself to be out of date or to publish content that is not adapted to your audience.

These are some tips for achieving the most accurate translation possible. The best thing you can do, however, is to leave it to the professionals and steer well clear of machine translations or word-for-word translation. At SeproTec we have extensive experience with marketing translations. We know that it is not enough for messages to be understood – they also have to connect, as while targeting a given market we must adapt the communication strategy to the culture and customs of the target audience. That is why our team is backed by professional translators with expertise in different marketing disciplines.

By the way: are you following us on Twitter?