Medical translations are possibly some of the most complicated kinds of translations to do. Here we’ve reviewed the requirements a translator must meet to take them on with all the keys to success.

What is a medical translation?

They are usually texts such as scientific articles, drug package inserts and clinical reports, or other content related to medicine or the pharmaceutical industry. It seems logical to surmise that translating them would require specific training on the topic and absolute accuracy.

What requirements must a medical document translator meet?

Requirements on education and experience: medical translators should have a recognized graduate qualification in translation or in any other field from an institution of higher education plus a minimum of two years of full-time professional experience in translating; native level in target language and a fluency level in the source language. Medical translators must be fully aware of cultural sensitivity issues, for example, some medical terms for diseases have a direct translation in the second language, while other terms have been adopted from English language.

It is the translator’s responsibility to maintain the patient’s privacy when doing their job. Its essential to ensure patient-physician confidentiality.

A professional medical translator must keep him/herself up to date  with the latest improvements and advances that have been made in the medicine industry and in medical technology.

Aside from a fluent level of the source language, experts in this kind of professional translation should understand that

· Their work must be highly rigorous, since the result directly affects the health of the readers. In fact, as a prerequisite the translator must be an expert in the pharmaceutical industry and scientific terminology.

· It is more than likely that the translator will need to do clinical research to find out what the exact translations of the terms are.

· This is a technical translation: synonyms, paraphrasing, and different wordings cannot be used. Either a known medical term or one that can be explained with footnotes must be chosen.

· Medical language is characterized by its direct and objective style. Every word counts, and the end text must have an expository clarity that makes it easy to understand.

· When terminology is used it should be clarified and justified in a footnote so readers will be able to easily understand it.

· Haste makes waste. Medical translations should be done with enough time to do a good job. New versions of previous texts should be translated from scratch so as not to repeat previous poor translations.

Why is doing a good medical translation so hard?

Because in any other field there are always references in the target language to check. Translating an article about a scientific discovery or about a new drug means the translator is on their own; they almost have to do some of the same research the author of the text did.

If you find yourself in this situation as a translator, keep the tips above in mind. If you need to purchase this kind of translation, choose an agency that offers pharmaceutical translation services to ensure the best result possible.

We hope we’ve given you a basic idea of what medical translations entail. Only the very best translators, like the ones at SeproTec, feel confident enough to take on these kinds of assignments because of their unquestionable complexity and the consequences of not doing a perfect job. Pharmaceutical companies, clinical research organizations (CROs), medical and surgical devices manufacturers and biotech companies rely on us for translation of their most sensitive documents and our strict quality control on the translated content. SeproTec delivers consistently clear, accurate translation of high-value information and our clients may be 100% sure they can depend on us.

To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your projects, reach out to our global team today.

Trends in translation always used to go hand in hand with contemporaneous technological innovations and economic models. E-commerce, for example, has a marked effect on the types of translations that will be needed in the future. Meanwhile, technological improvements also influence the way translations are produced.

The future of the translation sector during these times of COVID-19.

Below, we analyze the main focal points related to the field of translation that will become particularly relevant in 2020. As we will see, the vast majority of them are related to networks and the way people consume and search for content on these networks.

Multimedia localization

Multimedia content (audio, video, flash movies, animation, e-learning content, rich media, and interactive materials) is an invaluable tool today for business worldwide. Multimedia has become both an effective and efficient way of connecting with a target audience. It is the process of modifying media, such as audio or video, with the aim of adapting to the preferences and the needs of people across the globe.

Often translation solutions are the key component of multimedia localization. However, additional aspects such as cultural differences and local regulations must always be taken into consideration by multimedia localization providers. By combining both translation and technical skills, they are able to produce high-quality media that reflect both the target audience and the source material. Multimedia localization can be a powerful communication tool—regardless of whether it is utilized for commercial or informational purposes. Due to high demand, increased need, and interest in information, more and more businesses and organizations are turning to multimedia such as e-learning modules and videos as a way to inform, train, and educate their customers and employees both locally and globally. In numerous cases recently, a lack of information or the wrong information—either provided inadvertently or maliciously—somewhat amplified the effects of feeling the fear of the unknown during this time of COVID-19.

Video translation

Video is becoming ever more entrenched as the main content format in the modern world. It is effective, it is viral, and platforms and websites position it better than they do text. This is mainly because users consume it more. Therefore, another important market niche in the translation sector will be the one that handles effective subtitling and dubbing of this visual content.
Online education

In an increasingly globalized environment, teaching is no longer merely local. Today, we can learn to play the piano with lessons on YouTube or attend private engineering classes from the other side of the world. Ultimately, education seems to be moving towards a borderless and barrier-free approach and one of the main barriers that we have to tear down is that of language.

The translation industry must therefore increase working with these types of audiovisual formats. What difficulties can arise? Mainly, handling the technical jargon inherent in each discipline.

Machine translation

Since the 17th century, attempts have been made to develop methods to allow for instant text translation. Fast content translations—and of the highest quality—are currently needed globally.
Thanks to the sophisticated solutions as well as the know-how of translation agencies to select the best solution for each project and feed the engines, machine translation automatically translates much of a text with increasing precision. Then we can tweak and correct any inaccuracies or errors that may have occurred in the process. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that this is a system that can be recommended as long as you utilize a full post-editing service to ensure the best possible quality.

Video Remote Interpreting

Video remote interpreting (VRI) is a video-telecommunication service that uses devices such as web cameras or videophones to provide sign language or spoken language interpreting services. This is done through a remote or off-site interpreter, in order to communicate with persons with whom there is a communication barrier. VRI is a growing field with one popular application being in the hospital emergency room. In this setting, it is essential that patients and caregivers communicate readily with medical personnel, but it may take time for a face-to-face interpreter to arrive on site. Hospitals with VRI capability can connect with a remote interpreter quickly and conduct triage and intake surveys with the patient or caregiver without significant delay. VRI is an extremely important tool when it comes to working with patients who do not speak English. When treating Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients, it is highly recommended for healthcare providers to add a video remote interpreter for medical interpretation during the communication session. Nowadays, VRI can also help reduce the spread of infection. Healthcare facilities can take steps to limit exposure by using VRI to communicate with their patients rather than meeting them in person.

 

Video Remote Interpreting bridges the gap between Over-the-Phone Interpreting (OPI) and in-person interpreting solutions, reducing the time and cost associated with travel and adding the advantage of visual support to OPI services.
The challenge of artificial intelligence (AI)

AI will allow both a much more direct and dynamic translation of much of the content on the web. Furthermore, well-trained artificial intelligence can learn quickly from its mistakes. It will therefore become an extremely useful element for translation agencies, since it will allow us to speed up our work.

In conclusion, the latest trends in translation show great advances in technology, but at the same time highlight the importance of a good agency of professionals who can manage each assignment properly, such as ourselves here at SeproTec, where we always work with one eye looking firmly towards the future.

 

It is also important to emphasize that 2020 is a seemingly good year to understand how external factors influence our sector. CSA predicted that the language services industry would continue to grow and that the market would increase to $56.18 billion by 2021. However, the unexpected global lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will affect all these market trends greatly. Organizations will continue to make their products and services available in more languages, however, this may be at a much slower rate than before, as we have seen in recent times the significant economic impact of the coronavirus on financial markets and vulnerable industries such as manufacturing, tourism, hospitality, and travel.

On the other hand, the coronavirus crisis has only heightened the need for innovation and co-creation.

We expect to see a different market split by segment for this year than previously predicted.

The words that save lives

marzo 23rd, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | International | Interpretación | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Literally several days ago we woke up in a new reality. The world seems to have stopped. Most of us have been more or less affected by COVID-19. Sometimes it’s about businesses, sometimes the situation is more serious: it’s about our family members.

The language industry will play a vital role in communications in this time of crisis, and communication is the key nowadays to advance the knowledge on this global issue.

Words that Save Lives_SeproTec_COVID19

Today we are particularly proud of our translators and interpreters – often on-site, in crisis places, in hospitals, at police precincts, courthouses, social aid centers and clinics.

You are our everyday #heroes!

Just keep in mind that every word the industry translates or interprets on COVID-19 helps saving lives.

#proudtobepartoftheindustry

 

SeproTec has been ranked #31 in this year’s Nimdzi Largest Language Service Providers in the World Report (The Nimdzi 100 2020).

SeproTec among Top35 Largest LSPs in The World_2020The report describes the size and state of the language services industry in 2020, including the ranking of the top 100 largest language service providers.

We have also been ranked #10 among the 30 fastest-growing LSPs with a growth of 41.6% in 2019.

On this occasion, we would also like to thank our entire team for their hard work and say Thank you! to our clients worldwide for their trust.

At SeproTec we care about our clients and, above all, we make a point of the fact that they can receive quality work in the shortest time possible in multiple language combinations. How do we do this? Thanks to two of our major cornerstones: we are an international company that offers a 24-hour/365-day service.

If you run a company that needs translation or interpreting services on a regular basis, you will be aware of the importance of being able to count on native speakers and, above all, specialized professionals to ensure everything you do is done as professionally as possible.

If, in addition, that same company offers multilingual solutions that allow you to work with any of your business partners or clients, whatever their mother tongue, the advantages multiply.

However, when it is international or out-of-office-hours services that are required, sometimes the linguistic professionalism and versatility of the translators and interpreters is simply not enough. Working internationally is not easy and throws up a number of barriers that are difficult to overcome. Even so, you can count on extremely reliable partners who will make the experience easier.

It is precisely for this reason that the global coverage offered by SeproTec is fundamental, because when hiring our services you know you can count on interpreters and translators anywhere in the world and, above all, at any time of the day or night. We are available 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Benefits wherever you might find yourself

Imagine, for example, that you need an interpreter for a telephone conversation or a video conference with someone who lives in Seattle, in the United States, and who you have arranged to meet at two in the afternoon (Seattle time). You will probably find it difficult to find an interpreter who is available because two o’clock in the afternoon in Seattle would be eleven o’clock at night in Spain. This is not the case if you use a company which, like ours, offers you global coverage.


A multilingual translation company is the best solution when you start working in other languages, offering many advantages over agencies that specialize in translation into a single language.

Firstly, because you can translate your corporate material into several languages at the same time. Imagine you are a company in the UK and are starting to work with Portugal, Germany, Japan and France at the same time. If you opt for a multilingual translation company, you can entrust the translation of all the documents you need into Portuguese, German, French and Japanese to one project manager. If you choose translation agencies that only work with one language, you will need to contact four agencies, each specializing in one of the languages you need. Just imagine how much work you will have contacting all these agencies if you are translating into six languages? Or even 10?

Secondly, these companies work with a huge range of professionals, which ensures that they will have someone specializing in your area. This means you can be sure you will get the best person for the job, whether you need to translate documents or your website, or if you are looking for simultaneous interpreting for an event, someone to translate your conversations with potential partners or customers (by telephone or in person), or any other additional services.

Finally, multilingual translation has another great advantage, because with these types of agencies your work goes through various filters before it comes back you, meaning you can be sure that everything will be practically perfect first time.

In short, SeproTec is the best option if you are looking for a professional translation to or from any language, anytime anywhere. Our international presence and 24-hour/365-day service will make managing your business so much easier.

Challenges of intercultural communication

abril 2nd, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | International | Localización | Marketing | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

Globalization gives you the opportunity to expand your business into other countries and to find and explore new markets in which to sell your products or services. Yet the overall global context does not mean that countries are giving up their cultural roots. When taking your brand into a country you don’t know, transcreation is the way to go. Transcreation means being aware of intercultural differences and analyzing them so as to adapt your communication to a different culture.

‘Transcreation goes beyond creative translation,’ says transcreation expert from Transcreat, agency with which SeproTec workd on a regular basis,

‘ You should forget old translation concepts of fidelity and transparency. Transcreation is about recreation. You should read an original and then forget its wording but keep in mind its meaning. When you have forgotten how this meaning was described in the original, you will be able to recreate it into another language based on the context, culture and idiosyncrasies of the people who are going to read your work.’

Expand your communication possibilities 

When you want to move your business to other countries, you find yourself having to make a huge marketing effort to achieve the desired levels of success. Globalization provides you with a world of business opportunities, but the fact that the world has never been more connected doesn’t mean the end of cultural and communication barriers between cultures.


What must you do to establish your business in a new country?

It has been shown that consumers are put off by poorly translated websites and tend not to trust them. This occurs with sites with text that is full of spelling mistakes, poorly translated or simply poorly written. This is not the only important aspect, though.

Have your website well translated and adapt it to your target market if you want to be successful

If you really want to expand your brand and increase your sales in a new country, having your website well translated is not enough.

- Adapt all your messages, your communication style and your campaigns to adjust them not only to a new language, but also to a new culture.

- Recruit native staff to ensure that your strategies are best suited to the values and characteristics that define your new audience.

A new communication structure

All too often, when we talk about starting to sell in another country, the first and only thing that comes to mind is translating our website, but this is by no means the only thing you are going to have to adapt.

- New country is synonymous with new bureaucracy and with building relationships with suppliers and distributors based there.

- If you have to change currencies, the best thing to do is review your entire pricing policy. Every culture has its own way of understanding prices and this is no trivial matter. Get in contact with experts if you feel unsure.

- Specific characteristics can also influence the design of your website, the colors used and even the type of people who appear in your visuals, videos and advertising spots.

Transcreation shows itself to be the most effective strategy. If you want to be successful, make sure you don’t focus all your effort just on a good translation, but also consider all the dimensions that influence your communications in the new country.
‘As the world we live in becomes more globalized, digital and diversified, and markets continue to broaden, new challenges arise,’ adds Arcelino Monteiro, one of our most trusted and experienced transcreation experts, ‘Never before has a service been in such high demand and as necessary and urgent as it is today: transcreation, a powerful globalization tool that takes into account heritage, local values, beliefs and cultures aspects to convey a message in a way that appeals to a different culture, reaching their hearts and minds and evoking emotions.’

According to Arcelino, main challenges when working on a transcreation project are:

• Puns;

• Idioms;

• Proverbs;

• Slogans;

and character limits (when they are applied).

SeproTec’s pioneering transcreation service involves translators, proofreaders, testers, creators and marketing and communication experts working together. This service is indispensable for reaching any market.

Translating a tweet: the best way to do it

marzo 19th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Did you know...? | International | Marketing | Social media - (Comentarios desactivados)

One of the main characteristics of the social media platform Twitter is that it has a character limit for each of the messages you want to publish, the famous 280 characters.

You have to express whatever it is you are thinking in that precise moment or convey it in an understandable way within that limit. By the way, increasing the character limit in Twitter posts from 140 to 280 characters was, according to many experts, one of the most important changes in PR and marketing in 2018.

Longer tweets give you an opportunity to get more content.

Tweet translation

Because of the social media platform’s character restriction, translation is a real challenge in certain language combinations. For example, from Spanish to English it is usually not that complicated as it has a simple structure that usually takes up less space. On the other hand, a translation into German can be quite complicated as it has longer words.

How to translate with space limits

This is a question that pertains not only to social media, but also to subtitling. The best approach is to take a number of factors into account:

- The maximum number of characters in each message. This may seem obvious, but you must take this into account because otherwise the message might not be published.

- The linguistic characteristics of the target language. To continue with the last example, if you know that German usually takes up more space then you need to come up with different solutions to successfully convey the same message as in the original language. In this case we’re talking about adaptation.

- The essence of the message you wish to convey. If you want to translate a publication originally written in English into German, the best thing you can do is identify the main gist of the message. If you are clear on what you are trying to convey, you can create a translation that, while not saying it in the same way, does convey the same idea.

- The marketing structure of the target language. You need to see the social media platform Twitter as just another marketing tool among the many that exist. This complicates everything a bit because, while also successfully conserving the original message’s meaning in the translation without exceeding the medium’s character limit, you must also choose the right terms to sell the product being marketed.

- Who is the intended recipient. In addition to all of the aforesaid, you must always be aware of who the intended recipient of the message is. This way you can adapt the tone and the terms used in the translation to catch their attention.

The limited number of characters we can use on Twitter may seem like a limitation, however a short message format allows you to share information very quickly. This is what distinguishes Twitter. Twitter users respond quickly to emerging information, and therefore, you cannot allow yourself to be out of date or to publish content that is not adapted to your audience.

These are some tips for achieving the most accurate translation possible. The best thing you can do, however, is to leave it to the professionals and steer well clear of machine translations or word-for-word translation. At SeproTec we have extensive experience with marketing translations. We know that it is not enough for messages to be understood – they also have to connect, as while targeting a given market we must adapt the communication strategy to the culture and customs of the target audience. That is why our team is backed by professional translators with expertise in different marketing disciplines.

By the way: are you following us on Twitter?

 

On February 21st we are celebrating International Mother Language Day!
It was approved at the 1999 UNESCO General Conference and has been observed throughout the world since 2000. ‘Since 2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages, the theme of this year’s International Mother Language Day will be indigenous languages as a factor in development, peace and reconciliation.’, UNESCO states.
At SeproTec offices there are several dozen languages spoken and our Team’s diveristy is what we love the most!

We are proud to inform that we have extended our bronze sponsorship for Translators without Borders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TwB know that #LanguageMatters and we know that #WordsMatter.

TWB has recently responded to the European refugee crisis, the Caribbean hurricanes, and the Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh, among others. As one of the most critical issues TwB are dealing with is the Rohingya refugee crisis, we strongly encourage you to read the ‘Report from the Field‘ by Andrew Bredenkamp, Chairman of Translators without Borders Board of Directors.

‘Access to information in a language someone can understand is a human right, above all in humanitarian crises. Communicating in the right language helps people feel empowered, dignified and safe.’

We are proud to be part of this effort.

SeproTec Translator of the Month: August 2018

septiembre 27th, 2018 | Posted by admin in International | SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

Let us announce the eleventh winner of the Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Virginia Santos, our translator and a real polyglot! Have a cup of tea and take a moment to read this very interesting interview!

 

What do you start your work day with?

Unless I have an urgent project that must be finished or is due that same day, my working day starts with, I must admit, a certain amount of laziness and self-reproach: “I am getting up far too late again! This is because I went to bed too late once more! I’m hopeless… and it took me one hour to eat breakfast!” … Then I start to approach the work with caution: I turn on the computer, and I look for some song, some information that I’m interested in… until it comes to a point where I tell myself “enough of this idleness!!!” And at that point I start to work with full focus, to the point where I can spend many hours translating without realizing it.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation?

Actually…never. I have always been, as far as I can remember, very excited about languages, and was heading in that direction in a natural way, without giving it much thought . In addition to that, this job fitted in perfectly with my lifestyle: it allowed me not only to work with languages all the time, but also to travel abroad with scholarships to continue studying them and to attend courses on many other subjects with freedom of schedules… Every day I thank Heaven for all the good things that this job brings me.

Virginia, you translate into Spanish from Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, English, German, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Slovak and Ukrainian. How did you become so interested (and proficient) in all these languages?

It’s impossible to answer this question in a few lines…

My interest for languages goes back to the time when, under circumstances which would take me too long to explain,  suddenly something “clicked” inside of me and I understood that languages are like mathematics (which I loved): absolutely logical, perfect, everything they are and happens to them has a reason for being and needs to happen; and that, each language, in its own way, is beautiful, they are all beautiful , insurmountable, boundless. They are like doors to the infinite, perfect and complete forms of seeing and interpreting the world…This wonder of the phenomenon (I would almost say “miracle”) of language and of each language in particular, has reaffirmed and strengthened itself with each new language I have studied, including the Slavic languages.

In the case of the Slavic languages, what fascinates me particularly about them is the etymology of the words: the concepts are very clear and very structured. There is so much order and logic in them that I have been able to encompass with relative ease, not only the whole Slavic branch, but through them I have come to better understand Latin (the construction of which is very clean, perfect, very similar to that of the Slavic languages) and as a consequence I have been acquiring a deeper understanding of Castilian, which is my own language. That is, thanks to the Slavic languages I have come to understand myself better and I have realized how my mother tongue reflects my own construction of the world.

The Slavic world also fascinates me because of the enormous richness of realities that it embraces: several continents, many and very diverse climates, numerous geographical regions (north, south, east, west), diverse religions, very different political systems, even various alphabets… It is a grandiose world. At a more personal level, I owe very much to this Slavic world: specifically to many flesh and bone Slavic people and to many experiences lived in those countries that have shaped me and are an intimate part of me.

And as far as proficiency… it is relatively simple. If you love what you do because it makes your life richer every day and if you add to that a personality (my own) that is perfectionist by nature (for better or for worse) and a dedication of time and effort which is almost unreasonable… it is inevitable to acquire proficiency!

If you hadn’t become a translator, then what do you think you would have done?

I wouldn’t know what to answer. There are many jobs that I like and that I am very strongly attracted to, but the truth is that I have found them because of my job as a translator. Translation takes me into many worlds and allows me, as well, to continuously study new things about other subjects that I am interested in.

Concurrently with my job, I have been trained in foot reflexology, pedagogy, body theology and many other things, with which I would like to work. When I now think about professions I like, I think that I would very much like to work as a childhood teacher or with babies, as a language teacher at university or as a foot reflexologist; and, of course I intend to keep on studying because there are many other topics that I am interested in and that I would like to investigate.

There is another job which I hold sacred and that I respect more than any other and it is the job of the home-maker. The real home-maker, the one who “makes a home”, who creates the warmth and the excellence in the quotidian “small big things”. I dream of that job because I believe that if more intelligent women dedicated themselves to the task, this work alone, would restore, in today´s world, the humanity and the warmth that it so direly needs.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

Many things. In the first place, the people of the team are wonderful. It is super pleasant to work with them; they take into account my circumstances, and they try to adapt the conditions of the project at hand to fit my needs. In the second place, there is a consistency in our collaboration and in the genre of projects, that allows me to work with a lot of systematicity and order. In the third place, I can see that SeproTec is a very serious and responsible company in administrative and tax matters, etc. And last, but not least, I am especially fond of SeproTec because it was the first company to offer me the opportunity to work as a translator at the moment when I had just obtained my degree and had yet a lot to learn. That opportunity meant a lot to me in many areas of my life, it opened many doors and ways, and it is something for which I am exceedingly grateful.

What do you think are the greatest challenges for the translation industry nowadays?

If the challenge is for the translation industry, then the challenge for any industry is always to be more efficient, to make more money… On the other hand, if the challenge is for translation, as a human activity, or for the translators as its architects, I would say that the challenges we face are several:

1. To be able to take advantage of computer-assisted translation tools without dehumanising ourselves, without acting like machines, without killing the language, impoverishing it with clichés and subjecting it to a deadly and vulgar globalization. We must take advantage of all the benefits of technical advances, without falling into mechanicism. We should be able to save the soul of the language: it would not help us to look for greater efficiency and profit, if we were to lose the nuances and subtleties that only a sensitive an educated human being can grasp.

2. To understand that knowledge or competence do not necessarily go hand in hand with degrees or formal qualifications. The obsession for qualification certificates and degrees and the fear of “professional intrusion” impoverish the world, in my opinion, and may be the enemies of things well done. It is undeniable that in the field of translation there are many competent translators that may be initially trained as doctors or engineers etc. It would be absurd to close the doors to them. It is also be the case that university careers in Spain do note even cover all the existing demands of translation. Do we have, for example, schools that train translators from Turkish, Wolof or Quechua? And, nevertheless, the translations from those languages may be needed. I think that reality should govern over formal qualifications, and that the work should be done by whoever does it well, independently of the degrees that that person has or doesn´t have. Socrates did not need to have a degree in Philosophy from the University of Athens to be founder of Philosophy itself… In a world that searches for truth, it is the individual who creates the qualification, and not the other way around.

3. Everybody who speaks, but especially linguists and translators have the responsibility of looking after the language, nowadays exposed to a type of violence to suit specific ideologies and an attempt to manipulate it into a mediocre version of itself; and this is, I believe, happening everywhere. This responsibility compels us to act firmly to maintain its logic, its clarity, its rigour and its Beauty, even when that implies our effective opposition to the clumsy, toxic and chaotic innovations of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language.

Thank you so much, Virginia! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie :)