When a professional translation is ordered for a website or other medium that has been designed for a specific language, it is typical for problems to arise when fitting the new text into the allotted space. In each language a different number of words may be needed to express the same idea. That is why ideas that we want to convey in French or Arabic usually take up more space than in English or Chinese.

Expansion and contraction of texts

This effect is known to translation professionals, and is called expansion or contraction depending on whether more or less space is taken up. For example, when translating a text from English into French, we know that the translation will expand by about 15% compared to its original version.

Although it is very hard for the translation and the original to end up with exactly the same number of words, the effect can be more noticeable depending on the language of the target readers. Generally speaking, Romance languages use more words and Germanic languages use fewer to convey the same concept.

How do contraction and expansion affect design?

Currently, we live in a highly visual world, in which the text on websites, social media, catalogs and brochures are designed to create a sensation and capture people’s attention within seconds. As result, when we have a very noticeable expansion or contraction phenomenon, the end-product may lose its efficacy and adjustments may be needed to conserve the original emotional impact.

At SeproTec we work with localization experts who help our clients to achieve a balance between translation and design. Their work ensures that the original communication goal is preserved, but they may use more appropriate cultural formulas, considering not only the concepts, but also the feelings they engender or the use of a vocabulary that is more familiar to the target readers.

Thanks to their work we are able to guarantee that the product that the end-client receives is true to the original, not just in terms of content, but also intent and appearance. A very graphic example of this are translations into Arabic: images and text boxes are ordered inversely so that they make sense in relation to the direction in which the text is read.

Other factors to bear in mind

In addition to the unpredictability of the amount of characters in a translation, additional factors, such as compound nouns or character width complicate the management and layout of the text.

Languages like Finnish, Dutch and German represent what in other languages would be a sequence of smaller words as a single long word.

For example, the Spanish phrase “Seguro de Responsabilidad civil de automóviles” becomes “Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung” in German. Although in Spanish that phrase can be adjusted to fit two lines, in German it cannot be automatically adjusted, which can present a layout challenge.

Regarding character width, for example, “plans” in English becomes “しょくぶつ” in Japanese, occupying much more horizontal space.

How does the work done by localizers affect prices?

Most of the language combinations are priced based on word count in the source text (the original text).  Nevertheless, there are times when pricing is based on the word count in the target language.  Since the variation in word count for a given translation cannot be known beforehand, generally conversion ratios are used depending on the project languages. These are established based on the average increase or decrease of the terms.

The final cost of a project will also depend on other factors, such as the subject and the modifications made by the localizer or layout team.  These are usually estimated in work hours. Nevertheless, it will always be faster and more economic to use our specialists than to hire a separate graphic designer for each language to which a document needs to be translated. Our in-house layout teams ensure that your designs are appropriately adapted, taking expansion and contraction into account.

In conclusion, we can say without a doubt that a good professional translation service will always give clients the results they’re looking for. It isn’t just about quality texts, but also good adaptations of the end-product.

 

 

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

marzo 16th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translation is an activity that applies to all fields of knowledge, to facilitate its dissemination and understanding by everyone. One of the fields in which we cannot do without translation is science, as it enables the exchange of information between researchers from different countries. For this reason, we will now analyze scientific translation and highlight its importance in the academic field.

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

What does scientific translation involve?

We should start with a general review of this specialty. Scientific translation, as its name suggests, aims to adapt research texts for readers who speak another language. Among these kinds of texts, we find the following.

  • - Scientific journal articles.
  • - Monographs.
  • - Theses.
  • - Conferences.
  • - Informative documents.

And what about technical translation? Generally, there is no consensus on what is considered technical translation. Several authors opt for a very broad meaning, extending it cover to all texts with specific terminology. Others are more specific, defining it as the translation of engineering texts or instruction manuals.

How important is it within science?

Science is defined, in very general terms, as an ordered system of structured knowledge. Of course, it is essential that such knowledge be disseminated throughout the scientific community so that it can be applied, expanded, and truly effective. This is where translation comes in, facilitating the understanding of texts and adapting them for the work of other researchers.

Today, English is considered the lingua franca in science. Therefore, all articles and research papers include an abstract, or summary, in English. This, however, has not always been the case: informative texts used to be written in French, German or Russian a century ago… And even in Latin, if we go back just a little bit further in time.

The scientific translator, an indispensable figure

The question of whether the specialized translator should be drawn from the scientific community seems increasingly clear. As with other disciplines, such as legal translation, here a slight error can seriously harm the recipient’s work. This shows the enormous responsibility of the scientific translator. To better illustrate their work, let’s review their main tasks.

  • - Documenting: they need to be familiar with repositories, magazines and other parallel sources.
  • - Understandable: it is essential that the text, its syntax and its terminology be understood.
  • - Situational: not only do ideas need to be conveyed, but also the expressions, which need to be adapted, as well as the terminology of the field in question.

Paradoxically, the main challenge for this type of professional is not related to science itself, but to their own translation activity. Internationally, university education is focused on direct translation into the mother tongue, but in the labor market, and even more so in this case, reverse translation is prioritized.

In summary, scientific translation is a fairly complex discipline. So much so that it requires different training than the other specialties of this discipline. It is also a fundamental process for the advancement of science and for the collaboration and growth of the scientific community.

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

The Medical Devices Regulation (MDR) will be applicable from May 2021.

Linguistic changes affected by the new MDR

The aim of MDR, which will be applied directly in all European Member States, replacing the existing EU directives on medical devices and active implantable medical devices, is to introduce a common regulatory framework for the medical devices market throughout the European Union – to set high standards of quality and safety and to harmonize the principles of implementation medical devices for marketing and use.

The European Union’s Medical Device Regulation will affect your medical products and their Instructions for Use (IFUs).

Apart from monitoring more thoroughly the safety profile of the products placed on the market through implementation of a post-market surveillance (PMS) plan, implementing and maintaining a risk management system throughout the lifecycle of a device is also needed. Companies not following the new rules will no longer be allowed to sell their medical products in the European Union.

An increased demand will be placed on manufacturers labelling and packing requirements through the MDR. According to FDA figures there has been a large increase inproduct recalls in the last decade of which 15 percent can be attributed to labelling errors. There will be requirements for manufacturers to have labels ready for immediate printing, thereby reducing the risk of a mass recall. In addition, companies must provide “instructions for use” (IFUs) that correspond to the format as defined by the EU MDR. The IFUs are available in several languages and require authoritative approval leading to significant effort for its management throughout the registration, production, and distribution process. The proposed procedures will enable the distribution process for appropriate IFU’s, making sure they are available in the correct language and updated as required.

MDR – Article 10 – General obligations of manufacturers states that ‘Manufacturers shall ensure that the device is accompanied by the information set out in Section 23 of Annex I in an official Union language(s) determined by the Member State in which the device is made available to the user or patient.’

The Regulation determines the kind of information that a manufacturer needs to include on a medical device:

  • (a) information allowing the identification of the device, including the device name, serial number, lot number, the UDI, the device model, as well as the name, address and the website of the manufacturer
  • (b) any warnings, precautions or measures to be taken by the patient or a healthcare professional with regard to reciprocal interference with reasonably foreseeable external influences, medical examinations or environmental conditions
  • (c) any information about the expected lifetime of the device and any necessary follow-up
  • (d) any other information to ensure safe use of the device by the patient, including the information in point (u) of Section 23.4 of Annex I. (the overall qualitative and quantitative information on the materials and substances to which patients can be exposed)

Additionally, the Article 18 thereof states that the information shall be stated in the language(s) determined by the concerned Member State. The information shall be written in a way that is readily understood by a lay person and shall be updated where appropriate. Updates of the information shall be made available to the patient via the website.

To see whether your company is ready for the new MDR, and in order to find gaps within a company, it is recommended that you perform a complete gap analysis. You should start with a gap assessment and evaluation of your current situation considering the type of product and define the required step to achieve compliance to MDR 2017/745. The goal of such MDR analysis is to help a Medical Company like Manufacturer, Distributor, Importer, Authorized Representative or Consultants to implement the new Regulation MDR and IVDR in an easier way. Pharma and life science companies will need to conduct a gap analysis from the linguistic point of view also to determine if any of the EU member state languages are missing in the documentation. If so, a strategy to add those missing languages is required in order to distribute product in those countries.

At SeproTec pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, chemistry and healthcare are some of our specialties. We employ the latest technological advances in translation in work processes designed from the ground up to meet the specific needs of life science sector organizations. To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your multilingual projects, reach out to our global team today.

For further information on the new MDR, https://ec.europa.eu/health/md_sector/new_regulations_en

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

 

 

Trends in translation always used to go hand in hand with contemporaneous technological innovations and economic models. E-commerce, for example, has a marked effect on the types of translations that will be needed in the future. Meanwhile, technological improvements also influence the way translations are produced.

The future of the translation sector during these times of COVID-19.

Below, we analyze the main focal points related to the field of translation that will become particularly relevant in 2020. As we will see, the vast majority of them are related to networks and the way people consume and search for content on these networks.

Multimedia localization

Multimedia content (audio, video, flash movies, animation, e-learning content, rich media, and interactive materials) is an invaluable tool today for business worldwide. Multimedia has become both an effective and efficient way of connecting with a target audience. It is the process of modifying media, such as audio or video, with the aim of adapting to the preferences and the needs of people across the globe.

Often translation solutions are the key component of multimedia localization. However, additional aspects such as cultural differences and local regulations must always be taken into consideration by multimedia localization providers. By combining both translation and technical skills, they are able to produce high-quality media that reflect both the target audience and the source material. Multimedia localization can be a powerful communication tool—regardless of whether it is utilized for commercial or informational purposes. Due to high demand, increased need, and interest in information, more and more businesses and organizations are turning to multimedia such as e-learning modules and videos as a way to inform, train, and educate their customers and employees both locally and globally. In numerous cases recently, a lack of information or the wrong information—either provided inadvertently or maliciously—somewhat amplified the effects of feeling the fear of the unknown during this time of COVID-19.

Video translation

Video is becoming ever more entrenched as the main content format in the modern world. It is effective, it is viral, and platforms and websites position it better than they do text. This is mainly because users consume it more. Therefore, another important market niche in the translation sector will be the one that handles effective subtitling and dubbing of this visual content.
Online education

In an increasingly globalized environment, teaching is no longer merely local. Today, we can learn to play the piano with lessons on YouTube or attend private engineering classes from the other side of the world. Ultimately, education seems to be moving towards a borderless and barrier-free approach and one of the main barriers that we have to tear down is that of language.

The translation industry must therefore increase working with these types of audiovisual formats. What difficulties can arise? Mainly, handling the technical jargon inherent in each discipline.

Machine translation

Since the 17th century, attempts have been made to develop methods to allow for instant text translation. Fast content translations—and of the highest quality—are currently needed globally.
Thanks to the sophisticated solutions as well as the know-how of translation agencies to select the best solution for each project and feed the engines, machine translation automatically translates much of a text with increasing precision. Then we can tweak and correct any inaccuracies or errors that may have occurred in the process. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that this is a system that can be recommended as long as you utilize a full post-editing service to ensure the best possible quality.

Video Remote Interpreting

Video remote interpreting (VRI) is a video-telecommunication service that uses devices such as web cameras or videophones to provide sign language or spoken language interpreting services. This is done through a remote or off-site interpreter, in order to communicate with persons with whom there is a communication barrier. VRI is a growing field with one popular application being in the hospital emergency room. In this setting, it is essential that patients and caregivers communicate readily with medical personnel, but it may take time for a face-to-face interpreter to arrive on site. Hospitals with VRI capability can connect with a remote interpreter quickly and conduct triage and intake surveys with the patient or caregiver without significant delay. VRI is an extremely important tool when it comes to working with patients who do not speak English. When treating Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients, it is highly recommended for healthcare providers to add a video remote interpreter for medical interpretation during the communication session. Nowadays, VRI can also help reduce the spread of infection. Healthcare facilities can take steps to limit exposure by using VRI to communicate with their patients rather than meeting them in person.

 

Video Remote Interpreting bridges the gap between Over-the-Phone Interpreting (OPI) and in-person interpreting solutions, reducing the time and cost associated with travel and adding the advantage of visual support to OPI services.
The challenge of artificial intelligence (AI)

AI will allow both a much more direct and dynamic translation of much of the content on the web. Furthermore, well-trained artificial intelligence can learn quickly from its mistakes. It will therefore become an extremely useful element for translation agencies, since it will allow us to speed up our work.

In conclusion, the latest trends in translation show great advances in technology, but at the same time highlight the importance of a good agency of professionals who can manage each assignment properly, such as ourselves here at SeproTec, where we always work with one eye looking firmly towards the future.

 

It is also important to emphasize that 2020 is a seemingly good year to understand how external factors influence our sector. CSA predicted that the language services industry would continue to grow and that the market would increase to $56.18 billion by 2021. However, the unexpected global lockdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will affect all these market trends greatly. Organizations will continue to make their products and services available in more languages, however, this may be at a much slower rate than before, as we have seen in recent times the significant economic impact of the coronavirus on financial markets and vulnerable industries such as manufacturing, tourism, hospitality, and travel.

On the other hand, the coronavirus crisis has only heightened the need for innovation and co-creation.

We expect to see a different market split by segment for this year than previously predicted.

At SeproTec we care about our clients and, above all, we make a point of the fact that they can receive quality work in the shortest time possible in multiple language combinations. How do we do this? Thanks to two of our major cornerstones: we are an international company that offers a 24-hour/365-day service.

If you run a company that needs translation or interpreting services on a regular basis, you will be aware of the importance of being able to count on native speakers and, above all, specialized professionals to ensure everything you do is done as professionally as possible.

If, in addition, that same company offers multilingual solutions that allow you to work with any of your business partners or clients, whatever their mother tongue, the advantages multiply.

However, when it is international or out-of-office-hours services that are required, sometimes the linguistic professionalism and versatility of the translators and interpreters is simply not enough. Working internationally is not easy and throws up a number of barriers that are difficult to overcome. Even so, you can count on extremely reliable partners who will make the experience easier.

It is precisely for this reason that the global coverage offered by SeproTec is fundamental, because when hiring our services you know you can count on interpreters and translators anywhere in the world and, above all, at any time of the day or night. We are available 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Benefits wherever you might find yourself

Imagine, for example, that you need an interpreter for a telephone conversation or a video conference with someone who lives in Seattle, in the United States, and who you have arranged to meet at two in the afternoon (Seattle time). You will probably find it difficult to find an interpreter who is available because two o’clock in the afternoon in Seattle would be eleven o’clock at night in Spain. This is not the case if you use a company which, like ours, offers you global coverage.


A multilingual translation company is the best solution when you start working in other languages, offering many advantages over agencies that specialize in translation into a single language.

Firstly, because you can translate your corporate material into several languages at the same time. Imagine you are a company in the UK and are starting to work with Portugal, Germany, Japan and France at the same time. If you opt for a multilingual translation company, you can entrust the translation of all the documents you need into Portuguese, German, French and Japanese to one project manager. If you choose translation agencies that only work with one language, you will need to contact four agencies, each specializing in one of the languages you need. Just imagine how much work you will have contacting all these agencies if you are translating into six languages? Or even 10?

Secondly, these companies work with a huge range of professionals, which ensures that they will have someone specializing in your area. This means you can be sure you will get the best person for the job, whether you need to translate documents or your website, or if you are looking for simultaneous interpreting for an event, someone to translate your conversations with potential partners or customers (by telephone or in person), or any other additional services.

Finally, multilingual translation has another great advantage, because with these types of agencies your work goes through various filters before it comes back you, meaning you can be sure that everything will be practically perfect first time.

In short, SeproTec is the best option if you are looking for a professional translation to or from any language, anytime anywhere. Our international presence and 24-hour/365-day service will make managing your business so much easier.

SeproTec Translator of the Month: March 2019

abril 5th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are excited to announce the winner of the March 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Alexandra Gabriela Calciu, one of our most trusted sworn translators. As you may see on the picture, Alexandra likes SeproTec as much as we SeproTec like her! :)

What do you start your workday with?

I’ll tell you how a busy day begins. When I have a lot of work, I usually get up at 5 or 6 in the morning. Just as there are people who do better at night, I have come to the conclusion that my brain works much better at dawn. That’s why I prefer to get up very early. Therefore, I get up, I prepare a good breakfast and a big cup of coffee, and I can start my work day, of course, always with optimism. I usually get to work immediately after breakfast, so as not to lose a minute of performance of my brain, since at that time it is at its best. I always finish my day getting my list of priorities ready for the next day. In this way, when I start the day, everything is ready and I know exactly where to start. I think that good organization is the key to success.

Why did you choose translation as a career?

Since I was little, I wasn’t very good at math and languages were my strength. Before I started studying them at school, I already had a good “background” regarding languages. Without much effort, I got to speak French and Spanish and stand out in my class. That is why I continued my journey through the great adventure of the language sector. I must admit it has not been easy, but it was worth it!

If you hadn’t become a translator, what do you think you would have done?

It’s a very good question… I think it has always been very clear to me that I wanted to do this, so I never thought about having another job. Naturally, I had to do other jobs until I became a translator, and each and every one of them has been related to customer service. Consequently, it is likely that, if I had not become a translator, I would be working in ​​human resources or customer service. It is a very difficult sector, since I think there is no more complicated work than customer service. However, due to my infinite patience, every day would be a new challenge and it would be a very entertaining task.

You are the first sworn translator we interview. What are, in your opinion, the biggest challenges sworn translators face on a daily basis?

I must admit it is a great honour to be chosen Translator of the Month, and it is even more so because I am the first sworn translator to be awarded. Sworn translators, apart from having the ENORMOUS responsibility of translating official documents (with everything this entails), face many daily challenges. One of them is acting as an advisor. Most of my clients ask me for advice on legal procedures, so many times I face the difficult situation of having the responsibility of advising and guiding the client regarding the procedures that must be followed.

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?

I couldn’t have said it better myself. We are always “behind the scenes” and people often don’t understand how difficult this job is and the responsibility we must assume when writing some words on a piece of paper. Many clients say “I could also do the translation myself, but…” ☹ It is a sentence I have heard many times and that makes me think many people don’t value this job. Fortunately, there is an even bigger number of people who do value this profession and know that we, translators (whether sworn or not), have an extremely important role and that not any bilingual person can perform such tasks.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

I have come a long way to get to work as Sworn Translator-Interpreter in Spain. When I started my “adventure” in the field of translation in Spain, I didn’t know how the sector worked. I started by contacting several companies, among which, of course, was SeproTec. I must admit that they have accepted me and made me feel a part of their GREAT FAMILY. Even during the first months of collaboration with SeproTec, I had the feeling that I had worked with them for a lifetime. Apart from the punctuality in payments and the quick solution of small problems that may arise along the projects, what I like the most about the collaboration I have with SeproTec is the human touch offered by the PMs, who are always polite, fast and reliable.

 

Thank you, Alexandra! It’s fantastic to have you among our Team of Translators! Happy Friday and enjoy your SeproTec hoodie :)

Challenges of intercultural communication

abril 2nd, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | International | Localización | Marketing | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

Globalization gives you the opportunity to expand your business into other countries and to find and explore new markets in which to sell your products or services. Yet the overall global context does not mean that countries are giving up their cultural roots. When taking your brand into a country you don’t know, transcreation is the way to go. Transcreation means being aware of intercultural differences and analyzing them so as to adapt your communication to a different culture.

‘Transcreation goes beyond creative translation,’ says transcreation expert from Transcreat, agency with which SeproTec workd on a regular basis,

‘ You should forget old translation concepts of fidelity and transparency. Transcreation is about recreation. You should read an original and then forget its wording but keep in mind its meaning. When you have forgotten how this meaning was described in the original, you will be able to recreate it into another language based on the context, culture and idiosyncrasies of the people who are going to read your work.’

Expand your communication possibilities 

When you want to move your business to other countries, you find yourself having to make a huge marketing effort to achieve the desired levels of success. Globalization provides you with a world of business opportunities, but the fact that the world has never been more connected doesn’t mean the end of cultural and communication barriers between cultures.


What must you do to establish your business in a new country?

It has been shown that consumers are put off by poorly translated websites and tend not to trust them. This occurs with sites with text that is full of spelling mistakes, poorly translated or simply poorly written. This is not the only important aspect, though.

Have your website well translated and adapt it to your target market if you want to be successful

If you really want to expand your brand and increase your sales in a new country, having your website well translated is not enough.

- Adapt all your messages, your communication style and your campaigns to adjust them not only to a new language, but also to a new culture.

- Recruit native staff to ensure that your strategies are best suited to the values and characteristics that define your new audience.

A new communication structure

All too often, when we talk about starting to sell in another country, the first and only thing that comes to mind is translating our website, but this is by no means the only thing you are going to have to adapt.

- New country is synonymous with new bureaucracy and with building relationships with suppliers and distributors based there.

- If you have to change currencies, the best thing to do is review your entire pricing policy. Every culture has its own way of understanding prices and this is no trivial matter. Get in contact with experts if you feel unsure.

- Specific characteristics can also influence the design of your website, the colors used and even the type of people who appear in your visuals, videos and advertising spots.

Transcreation shows itself to be the most effective strategy. If you want to be successful, make sure you don’t focus all your effort just on a good translation, but also consider all the dimensions that influence your communications in the new country.
‘As the world we live in becomes more globalized, digital and diversified, and markets continue to broaden, new challenges arise,’ adds Arcelino Monteiro, one of our most trusted and experienced transcreation experts, ‘Never before has a service been in such high demand and as necessary and urgent as it is today: transcreation, a powerful globalization tool that takes into account heritage, local values, beliefs and cultures aspects to convey a message in a way that appeals to a different culture, reaching their hearts and minds and evoking emotions.’

According to Arcelino, main challenges when working on a transcreation project are:

• Puns;

• Idioms;

• Proverbs;

• Slogans;

and character limits (when they are applied).

SeproTec’s pioneering transcreation service involves translators, proofreaders, testers, creators and marketing and communication experts working together. This service is indispensable for reaching any market.

SeproTec at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting!

marzo 14th, 2019 | Posted by admin in conferences | events | Life Sciences | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

Sharing views and expertise with industry leaders, meeting 6,000+ life sciences professionals, networking… This is what awaits SeproTec Team at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting in San Diego, June 23-27. We will be exhibiting at booth #621.

This meeting is a must-attend for all life science professionals around the globe. Stay tuned for more info!

 

SeproTec: #24 on Slator 2019 LSP Index

febrero 27th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Localización | Rankings | SeproTec | Sin categoría | Slator | ¿Sabías qué...? - (Comentarios desactivados)

Slator released the Slator 2019 Language Service Provider Index featuring the world’s largest translation, localization, interpretation, subtitling and dubbing companies.

We have a pleasure to inform you that SeproTec is ranked #24 in Slator’s Language Service Provider Index for 2019!

SeproTec ranked 24 on Slator 2019 LSPI

2018 was a positive year overall, with strong double-digit growth for many of the leading 40 or so players, states Slator.

We are celebrating being within the Leaders Group!

We would like to say Thank you! to the whole SeproTec team: our employees, translators and interpreters for all their efforts and hard work.

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: June 2018

agosto 6th, 2018 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

 

Let us announce the ninth winner of the Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

We have launched the initiative back in September 2017 and this is a way to say Thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

 

Meet Sandrine Harris! Sandrine was so kind to answer our questions – so here we go!

What do you start your work day with?

I always start my day with a cup of tea while going through my e-mails and checking my planning for the day.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue translation career?

I became a translator 20 years ago when I moved from England to Reims, France to follow my husband. At the time I was a R&D Manager for a cosmetic company but if I wanted to get a similar job, I would have had to travel over 2 hours as the companies were located in Paris so I did not consider this option having a young child. By chance, I came across a job advertisement looking for a freelance FR-EN patent translator in Chemistry. My scientific background fitted their requirements and it all started from there.

If you wouldn´t have become a translator, then what would you do?

I probably would still be a R&D Manager in a chemistry company and as a consequence not spending too much time with my family.

What do you enjoy about working with SeproTec?

I like all the team members I have worked with so far. Everybody is very nice, so polite, supportive and proactive. SeproTec recognize the good work done and it is great to be rewarded.

 What do you think are the greatest challenges of the translation industry nowadays?

I think the biggest challenges are to be better than machine translation tools that have been improving at a fast rate over the last 5 years. To do so, the translator must be fast, reliable, very accurate and provide perfect and high quality translations.

What is your favourite book?

It’s a recent French book and I do not think it has been translated so far: “Juste avant le Bonheur” by Agnès Ledig. I love her style and the positive message she conveyed despite such tragic events.

 

Thank you, Sandrine, and enjoy your SeproTec hoodie! It’s a real pleasure to work with you :)