How to optimize and reduce costs in patent translation

septiembre 28th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Traducción | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translating patents is often a real challenge. To understand why, it is first of all necessary to understand what a patent is: it is the bundle of rights that allows us to register a new technological process or product in a country. Most national patent offices require that your application be filed in the official national language or, if it is a regional office such as the EPO or WIPO, you can choose between local languages (e.g. English, French or German). The stakes are such that we do not even need to explain how important it is that the translation of the patent is carried out properly and by a professional expert both in the technological field related to the patent and in the patent filing process.

What must be considered in order to reduce patent translation costs?

Intellectual property (IP) translation is a necessary process when we want to extend the exploitation rights over a product, process or technology to other countries. When trading with foreign companies, this translation also plays an important role, as it does if you want to manufacture in another country: this document will protect you against possible legislative problems.

The correct wording of a patent, especially the patent claims, defines what the patent does and the scope of what you want to protect, if, that is, the competent authority agrees to approve your patent application. The claims are the part of the patent that is reviewed by the courts in the event of a patent infringement allegation, which is why patent registration offices carefully examine each claim before granting a patent.

The importance of optimizing or reducing a patent translation

The importance of patent translation optimization lies in the need for all the documentation provided to be correct, while reducing waiting times. Optimization is, therefore, a key element insofar as time and final cost are considered. And a poor translation can increase one as much as the other, on the basis that patent registration often takes a year or more. The role of a professional agency, such as SeproTec, is also important in this respect.

Why outsource to a professional agency?

If mistakes are made, the translation of a patent can be ineffective, as it becomes completely obscure. It is common for registrations to be rejected because an application has not been properly completed. Which is why a professional patent translation agency always starts from an understanding of the invention to be registered. This is the first step required for making the wording in the translation as clear as possible, with the exact and appropriate words being used combined with a thorough check of each term.

The role of a professional agency can, therefore, be honed down to three basic aspects.

  1. The first is to clarify the substance of the document, which is both legal and, at the same time, highly technical.  Given the importance of terminology in the patent translation process, at SeproTec we only handle these projects with approved translators who are experts in the technical field related to the invention.  Furthermore, we possess the highest quality certifications, ISO 9001 and ISO 17100, to ensure the quality of the final result.
  2. On the other hand, the text must be natural, but respecting all the content of the original, avoiding, under all circumstances, ambiguity and providing total clarity.
  3. By outsourcing the patent translation process to a professional language service, rather than relying on a third party provider, you will ensure effective communication, coordination, consistency and quality assurance at every step of the patent translation process.

 

In addition, the cost of translation can represent up to 60% of the total validation cost and up to 20% of the total lifetime cost of a patent. SeproTec works with skilled professional resources and effective CAT- and AI-based tools to increase efficiency and reduce costs while ensuring quality. The latter include translation memory tools and glossaries that are used to identify repetitive text, thereby reducing time and costs during the patent translation process.

Using a professional language provider who also has extensive experience in patent translation pays off from the word go. The risk of submitting cheap poor quality translations when filing an international patent completely cancels out the potential savings made from using a non-professional provider.

If you want to know more, contact us on this link.

 

 

SeproTec achieves a triple quality certificate for translations of medical devices

agosto 31st, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

SeproTec Multilingual Solutions has made another breakthrough in its medical translation services, becoming one of the few agencies on the market to receive ISO 13485, ISO 17100 and ISO 9001 certifications.

As a company that provides high-quality multilingual services, at SeproTec we highlight the importance of certifications with different ISO standards, such as 15485, 17100 and 9001. These are essential to validate the translation of medical, scientific and technical content that we offer, showing that they conform to the most rigorous and recognized standards that exist. Below, we explain in detail of what these certifications consist, as well as what each standard includes and what it contributes, both to us and to our clients.

SeproTec achieves a triple quality certificate for translations of medical devices

What does it mean to have these certifications? 

SGS, a world leader in inspection, verification, testing and certification, has awarded SeproTec Multilingual Solutions ISO 13485 certification for its translation services in the field of medical devices.  Health sciences is one of the sectors in which SeproTec is most specialized. We carry out translations of medical content with the highest level of precision, fully aware that errors cannot be tolerated. Lives are at stake.

Having these validations is a guarantee that our work meets the highest standards imposed by the Quality Management System.  This includes the ISO standards that must be met for a maximum service guarantee. In our case, we comply with three of these standards in terms of quality, and one in terms of the environment, ensuring, in each of our projects, the highest level of dedication, effort, precision, responsibility and safety.

ISO 13485 standard for medical devices

The standard ISO 13485 is a quality management system used by manufacturers, importers and distributors of medical devices. A medical device is any instrument, apparatus, device, machine, equipment, reagent for in-vitro use, computer program, material, or other similar or related article, which is intended by the manufacturer to be used on people for a health-related purpose.

It is a standard that is aimed not just at manufacturers of medical devices, but also at the suppliers with whom they interact throughout the medical device’s life-cycle.  Translation becomes associated with the medical device as soon as it is exported to other countries, with the need arising to translate its labeling, user instructions, and other marketing materials, to give just a few examples.

This ISO 13485 standard effectively embraces the quality processes that must be followed with clients from the medical and diagnostic device industries, as well as the hospital and dental clinic supply industry. It is a system guaranteed by the rigors of an independent external audit, and it focuses on issues of great importance such as safety and excellence. Both of these issues are of particular relevance in the medicine industry.

ISO 17100 and 9001 Standards

These two standards are even more important in translation services. The first one, ISO 17100, specific to the translation sector, lists what requirements for each issue must be met as regards the minimum qualification for translators, management of central processes, availability of resources, data protection and confidentiality.

For its part, the ISO 9001 standard ensures a good relationship between supplier and client through a universal language, as well as the ability to provide a service. We always meet both external and internal requirements within our organization, in addition to following cycles of continuous improvement and respecting other labor issues.

These are all advantages for clients

The benefits of working with an ISO 13485 certified language provider include easy integration of supplier and client quality systems, cost reduction and risk minimization in client audits, and the ability to shorten the qualification processes, significantly reducing the allocation of resources and overhead for monitoring suppliers.

 

Obtaining this latest ISO certification confirms SeproTec’s commitment to the most rigorous and recognized QMS standards applied in the health sciences industry.  Over the years, SeproTec has worked with many leading health sciences organizations, including pharmaceutical companies, biotech companies, medical device manufacturers and CROs, and we currently have 110 active clients in the sector, while in 2020 we translated more than 109 million words for the industry, our best endorsement.

Any translation process requires a review stage that guarantees optimal quality. This need is much more prominent, however, in the case of pharmaceutical or medical translation, due to some of the factors that come into play.

Medical translation: much more than translating

It is easy to understand that any activity related to the medical or health field requires special attention and care. This is field of vital importance: in it, a job well done can be a vital part of treating a patient and, on the flipside, a job poorly done could have fatal results. Translation within this field is no different.

Most medical texts go through a full translation process, since the results and advances of the numerous research initiatives around the world must be made available to all professionals on the planet. That is why we need specialized linguists who know first-hand how these texts work and the specificities of the different languages in which they will be working and who, in turn, have specific knowledge about the subject in question.

 

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

Quality translations for a crucial sector

As in any translation process, texts have to go through various stages in order to provide an optimal final result. Not all translation providers are created equal, but, assuming you have opted for an ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified corporate translation provider, you can expect your translation to be put together by at least three different people in the translation, editing and proofreading pipeline.

The quality control process, a whole, well-synchronized team

First, a specialized translator, selected for their experience as an expert in the field, with experience translating languages for native-speaker readers, will be in charge of reading the entire text, investigating any ambiguities, and transmitting all the information to the target language.

After that, a different linguist has to review the initial translation, correcting and improving any errors or slips that the translator may have left in. The proofreader adds further expertise in the subject matter and native language to the translation project, thus performing Linguistic Quality Assurance (LQA) to ensure that the translation is clear, correct, and concise.

After the translator and proofreader have completed their assignments and the translation has gone through Language Quality Assurance (LQA), the project usually goes to the layout team. Multilingual DTP experts eliminate any difficulties arising from expanding or retracting text, or character differences from the original language to the target language translation.

Lastly, a different proofreader will produce a final version. In the process of reviewing the general appearance, style and design of the project, it is also detected if something is missing or if there is an error, in which case the Project Manager (PM) is notified and forwards the text to the appropriate person to correct the problem.

When a document is submitted for translation, there is a whole team involved with the final product, which is thoroughly reviewed and researched before being finalized. Beyond the translator, reviewer, and proofreader, you have a project manager and may include a multilingual layout team working to deliver the final translation. Content can thus be analyzed more exhaustively, guaranteeing quality translations.The final quality of the text that we deliver to the client must be the highest possible, of course, due to the potential consequences that an error in this kind of text can cause. Take, for example, the case of a patient receiving an incorrect dose of a drug due to a failure to properly transcribe a medical package insert. Even more serious cases can occur, such as errors of meaning when transcribing the way to proceed during a surgical intervention, aggravating the patient’s symptoms.

For this reason, pharmaceutical and medical translation is one of the translation fields that requires the most attention. Health depends on a correct understanding and transfer of information between specialists into the most different languages, and each medical specialty has a plethora of highly specific terms. In these cases, it is essential that the translator have certain knowledge on the specific subject matter and be capable of resolving errors or technical problems. A good team of experienced linguists, such as that of SeproTec, will guarantee the highest quality in texts of this kind.

 

 

 

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

marzo 16th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translation is an activity that applies to all fields of knowledge, to facilitate its dissemination and understanding by everyone. One of the fields in which we cannot do without translation is science, as it enables the exchange of information between researchers from different countries. For this reason, we will now analyze scientific translation and highlight its importance in the academic field.

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

What does scientific translation involve?

We should start with a general review of this specialty. Scientific translation, as its name suggests, aims to adapt research texts for readers who speak another language. Among these kinds of texts, we find the following.

  • - Scientific journal articles.
  • - Monographs.
  • - Theses.
  • - Conferences.
  • - Informative documents.

And what about technical translation? Generally, there is no consensus on what is considered technical translation. Several authors opt for a very broad meaning, extending it cover to all texts with specific terminology. Others are more specific, defining it as the translation of engineering texts or instruction manuals.

How important is it within science?

Science is defined, in very general terms, as an ordered system of structured knowledge. Of course, it is essential that such knowledge be disseminated throughout the scientific community so that it can be applied, expanded, and truly effective. This is where translation comes in, facilitating the understanding of texts and adapting them for the work of other researchers.

Today, English is considered the lingua franca in science. Therefore, all articles and research papers include an abstract, or summary, in English. This, however, has not always been the case: informative texts used to be written in French, German or Russian a century ago… And even in Latin, if we go back just a little bit further in time.

The scientific translator, an indispensable figure

The question of whether the specialized translator should be drawn from the scientific community seems increasingly clear. As with other disciplines, such as legal translation, here a slight error can seriously harm the recipient’s work. This shows the enormous responsibility of the scientific translator. To better illustrate their work, let’s review their main tasks.

  • - Documenting: they need to be familiar with repositories, magazines and other parallel sources.
  • - Understandable: it is essential that the text, its syntax and its terminology be understood.
  • - Situational: not only do ideas need to be conveyed, but also the expressions, which need to be adapted, as well as the terminology of the field in question.

Paradoxically, the main challenge for this type of professional is not related to science itself, but to their own translation activity. Internationally, university education is focused on direct translation into the mother tongue, but in the labor market, and even more so in this case, reverse translation is prioritized.

In summary, scientific translation is a fairly complex discipline. So much so that it requires different training than the other specialties of this discipline. It is also a fundamental process for the advancement of science and for the collaboration and growth of the scientific community.

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

The Medical Devices Regulation (MDR) will be applicable from May 2021.

Linguistic changes affected by the new MDR

The aim of MDR, which will be applied directly in all European Member States, replacing the existing EU directives on medical devices and active implantable medical devices, is to introduce a common regulatory framework for the medical devices market throughout the European Union – to set high standards of quality and safety and to harmonize the principles of implementation medical devices for marketing and use.

The European Union’s Medical Device Regulation will affect your medical products and their Instructions for Use (IFUs).

Apart from monitoring more thoroughly the safety profile of the products placed on the market through implementation of a post-market surveillance (PMS) plan, implementing and maintaining a risk management system throughout the lifecycle of a device is also needed. Companies not following the new rules will no longer be allowed to sell their medical products in the European Union.

An increased demand will be placed on manufacturers labelling and packing requirements through the MDR. According to FDA figures there has been a large increase inproduct recalls in the last decade of which 15 percent can be attributed to labelling errors. There will be requirements for manufacturers to have labels ready for immediate printing, thereby reducing the risk of a mass recall. In addition, companies must provide “instructions for use” (IFUs) that correspond to the format as defined by the EU MDR. The IFUs are available in several languages and require authoritative approval leading to significant effort for its management throughout the registration, production, and distribution process. The proposed procedures will enable the distribution process for appropriate IFU’s, making sure they are available in the correct language and updated as required.

MDR – Article 10 – General obligations of manufacturers states that ‘Manufacturers shall ensure that the device is accompanied by the information set out in Section 23 of Annex I in an official Union language(s) determined by the Member State in which the device is made available to the user or patient.’

The Regulation determines the kind of information that a manufacturer needs to include on a medical device:

  • (a) information allowing the identification of the device, including the device name, serial number, lot number, the UDI, the device model, as well as the name, address and the website of the manufacturer
  • (b) any warnings, precautions or measures to be taken by the patient or a healthcare professional with regard to reciprocal interference with reasonably foreseeable external influences, medical examinations or environmental conditions
  • (c) any information about the expected lifetime of the device and any necessary follow-up
  • (d) any other information to ensure safe use of the device by the patient, including the information in point (u) of Section 23.4 of Annex I. (the overall qualitative and quantitative information on the materials and substances to which patients can be exposed)

Additionally, the Article 18 thereof states that the information shall be stated in the language(s) determined by the concerned Member State. The information shall be written in a way that is readily understood by a lay person and shall be updated where appropriate. Updates of the information shall be made available to the patient via the website.

To see whether your company is ready for the new MDR, and in order to find gaps within a company, it is recommended that you perform a complete gap analysis. You should start with a gap assessment and evaluation of your current situation considering the type of product and define the required step to achieve compliance to MDR 2017/745. The goal of such MDR analysis is to help a Medical Company like Manufacturer, Distributor, Importer, Authorized Representative or Consultants to implement the new Regulation MDR and IVDR in an easier way. Pharma and life science companies will need to conduct a gap analysis from the linguistic point of view also to determine if any of the EU member state languages are missing in the documentation. If so, a strategy to add those missing languages is required in order to distribute product in those countries.

At SeproTec pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, chemistry and healthcare are some of our specialties. We employ the latest technological advances in translation in work processes designed from the ground up to meet the specific needs of life science sector organizations. To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your multilingual projects, reach out to our global team today.

For further information on the new MDR, https://ec.europa.eu/health/md_sector/new_regulations_en

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

 

 

SeproTec at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting!

marzo 14th, 2019 | Posted by admin in conferences | events | Life Sciences | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

Sharing views and expertise with industry leaders, meeting 6,000+ life sciences professionals, networking… This is what awaits SeproTec Team at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting in San Diego, June 23-27. We will be exhibiting at booth #621.

This meeting is a must-attend for all life science professionals around the globe. Stay tuned for more info!

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: October 2018

noviembre 16th, 2018 | Posted by admin in Blog | SeproTec | Traducción | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We announce the thirteenth winner of our Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Piotr Tomsia and we would like to invite you to read a short interview with him.

Piotr, what do you start your work day with?

I am an avid fan of daily routines, so I always try to start my days off in a similar fashion. Almost every day I get up at 6 AM. Next, I make some coffee (and I’m an even bigger fan of coffee) and sit down with my laptop. I spend the next 30 to 45 minutes reading. It’s not purely for informative reasons. It also helps me get in rhythm for the day. After about an hour I start proofreading translations from the day before. This way, I get to do some work before the usual 9 AM deadlines and find time for sports (mostly basketball!) and other activities in the afternoon.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation?

I believe I first started considering a career in translation in high school. However back then I mostly wanted to work with languages in any kind of manner. It was only a couple of years later, at university, that I realized translation and interpreting were the two things that I enjoyed the most. After graduating I started an internship, which convinced me that this was the right thing to do. It also helped to have some of the nicest and brightest people I have ever met as my teachers.

 If you could speak any foreign language, which would it be and why?

My wife always tells me I have a knack for Italian. I do love this country and its culture (food isn’t bad either, right?) so there must be something in it. It would also be nice to speak Mandarin and see what that part of the world is up to. Or maybe Japanese? It’s very hard to pick just one but I would ultimately go with Italian. It would greatly help with exploring the country’s culinary secrets J

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

This particular question is easier because the thing that I enjoy the most is also the thing that I am most impressed with. It’s the work culture. SeproTec is like a well-oiled machine. Every person in the company that I interact with is very professional and goes above and beyond to make everything clear, provide help and answer every single question. It makes my work a lot less complicated!

 In your opinion, which are the most important challenges in the translation industry nowadays?

In my view, the most important challenge that the translation industry (or maybe the translators themselves) faces is the pace of work and ever-tighter deadlines. Clients often require very quick services. It may pose a problem since everyone has to work on several projects at the same time. This in turn requires greater efficiency and organizational skills, and not everyone is up for the challenge.

 

Thank you Piotr, dzięki! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie and thank you for your cooperation!

We have a pleasure to announce the twelfth winner of our Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Gareth Harding and we would like to invite you to read a short interview with him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gareth, what do you start your work day with?

As I work from home and don’t have to travel to work, I start my working day reading the news on my computer while eating breakfast.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation? 

I decided I wanted to work as a translator after I moved to Spain with my wife and family and found teaching English was not for me.

If you hadn’t become a translator, then what do you think you would have done? 

Prior to working as a translator I was an environmental consultant for many years in London. It was very interesting work, every project was different and I was using my science background to solve problems and also learning about engineering and finance.

If you could speak any foreign language, which would it be and why? 

I guess it would be Chinese or really any language with a totally different structure from the Latin-based languages. This would give an interesting insight into a different way of looking at and thinking about the world.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec? 

The variety of the work and being able to use my scientific background and knowledge.

Human Translation vs Machine Translation – what do you think? 

Machine Translation is improving all the time and is now excellent, but I think humans will always be needed to edit the output from machine translation.

 

Thank you, Gareth. We really enjoy working with you! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie :)

We are proud to inform that we have extended our bronze sponsorship for Translators without Borders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TwB know that #LanguageMatters and we know that #WordsMatter.

TWB has recently responded to the European refugee crisis, the Caribbean hurricanes, and the Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh, among others. As one of the most critical issues TwB are dealing with is the Rohingya refugee crisis, we strongly encourage you to read the ‘Report from the Field‘ by Andrew Bredenkamp, Chairman of Translators without Borders Board of Directors.

‘Access to information in a language someone can understand is a human right, above all in humanitarian crises. Communicating in the right language helps people feel empowered, dignified and safe.’

We are proud to be part of this effort.

Happy International Translation Day 2018!

septiembre 30th, 2018 | Posted by admin in SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

30. September has been celebrated worldwide as International Translation Day since 1991, when it was established by the IFT (International Federation of Translators). At SeproTec, we know that the role of translators and interpreters in the globalized world is essential and we celebrate this day in recognition of our translators and interpreters around the world. We know that without their hard work, we would not succeed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a big Thank you! for all your hard work and efforts!