Any translation process requires a review stage that guarantees optimal quality. This need is much more prominent, however, in the case of pharmaceutical or medical translation, due to some of the factors that come into play.

Medical translation: much more than translating

It is easy to understand that any activity related to the medical or health field requires special attention and care. This is field of vital importance: in it, a job well done can be a vital part of treating a patient and, on the flipside, a job poorly done could have fatal results. Translation within this field is no different.

Most medical texts go through a full translation process, since the results and advances of the numerous research initiatives around the world must be made available to all professionals on the planet. That is why we need specialized linguists who know first-hand how these texts work and the specificities of the different languages in which they will be working and who, in turn, have specific knowledge about the subject in question.

 

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

Quality translations for a crucial sector

As in any translation process, texts have to go through various stages in order to provide an optimal final result. Not all translation providers are created equal, but, assuming you have opted for an ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified corporate translation provider, you can expect your translation to be put together by at least three different people in the translation, editing and proofreading pipeline.

The quality control process, a whole, well-synchronized team

First, a specialized translator, selected for their experience as an expert in the field, with experience translating languages for native-speaker readers, will be in charge of reading the entire text, investigating any ambiguities, and transmitting all the information to the target language.

After that, a different linguist has to review the initial translation, correcting and improving any errors or slips that the translator may have left in. The proofreader adds further expertise in the subject matter and native language to the translation project, thus performing Linguistic Quality Assurance (LQA) to ensure that the translation is clear, correct, and concise.

After the translator and proofreader have completed their assignments and the translation has gone through Language Quality Assurance (LQA), the project usually goes to the layout team. Multilingual DTP experts eliminate any difficulties arising from expanding or retracting text, or character differences from the original language to the target language translation.

Lastly, a different proofreader will produce a final version. In the process of reviewing the general appearance, style and design of the project, it is also detected if something is missing or if there is an error, in which case the Project Manager (PM) is notified and forwards the text to the appropriate person to correct the problem.

When a document is submitted for translation, there is a whole team involved with the final product, which is thoroughly reviewed and researched before being finalized. Beyond the translator, reviewer, and proofreader, you have a project manager and may include a multilingual layout team working to deliver the final translation. Content can thus be analyzed more exhaustively, guaranteeing quality translations.The final quality of the text that we deliver to the client must be the highest possible, of course, due to the potential consequences that an error in this kind of text can cause. Take, for example, the case of a patient receiving an incorrect dose of a drug due to a failure to properly transcribe a medical package insert. Even more serious cases can occur, such as errors of meaning when transcribing the way to proceed during a surgical intervention, aggravating the patient’s symptoms.

For this reason, pharmaceutical and medical translation is one of the translation fields that requires the most attention. Health depends on a correct understanding and transfer of information between specialists into the most different languages, and each medical specialty has a plethora of highly specific terms. In these cases, it is essential that the translator have certain knowledge on the specific subject matter and be capable of resolving errors or technical problems. A good team of experienced linguists, such as that of SeproTec, will guarantee the highest quality in texts of this kind.

 

 

 

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

marzo 16th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translation is an activity that applies to all fields of knowledge, to facilitate its dissemination and understanding by everyone. One of the fields in which we cannot do without translation is science, as it enables the exchange of information between researchers from different countries. For this reason, we will now analyze scientific translation and highlight its importance in the academic field.

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

What does scientific translation involve?

We should start with a general review of this specialty. Scientific translation, as its name suggests, aims to adapt research texts for readers who speak another language. Among these kinds of texts, we find the following.

  • - Scientific journal articles.
  • - Monographs.
  • - Theses.
  • - Conferences.
  • - Informative documents.

And what about technical translation? Generally, there is no consensus on what is considered technical translation. Several authors opt for a very broad meaning, extending it cover to all texts with specific terminology. Others are more specific, defining it as the translation of engineering texts or instruction manuals.

How important is it within science?

Science is defined, in very general terms, as an ordered system of structured knowledge. Of course, it is essential that such knowledge be disseminated throughout the scientific community so that it can be applied, expanded, and truly effective. This is where translation comes in, facilitating the understanding of texts and adapting them for the work of other researchers.

Today, English is considered the lingua franca in science. Therefore, all articles and research papers include an abstract, or summary, in English. This, however, has not always been the case: informative texts used to be written in French, German or Russian a century ago… And even in Latin, if we go back just a little bit further in time.

The scientific translator, an indispensable figure

The question of whether the specialized translator should be drawn from the scientific community seems increasingly clear. As with other disciplines, such as legal translation, here a slight error can seriously harm the recipient’s work. This shows the enormous responsibility of the scientific translator. To better illustrate their work, let’s review their main tasks.

  • - Documenting: they need to be familiar with repositories, magazines and other parallel sources.
  • - Understandable: it is essential that the text, its syntax and its terminology be understood.
  • - Situational: not only do ideas need to be conveyed, but also the expressions, which need to be adapted, as well as the terminology of the field in question.

Paradoxically, the main challenge for this type of professional is not related to science itself, but to their own translation activity. Internationally, university education is focused on direct translation into the mother tongue, but in the labor market, and even more so in this case, reverse translation is prioritized.

In summary, scientific translation is a fairly complex discipline. So much so that it requires different training than the other specialties of this discipline. It is also a fundamental process for the advancement of science and for the collaboration and growth of the scientific community.

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

The Medical Devices Regulation (MDR) will be applicable from May 2021.

Linguistic changes affected by the new MDR

The aim of MDR, which will be applied directly in all European Member States, replacing the existing EU directives on medical devices and active implantable medical devices, is to introduce a common regulatory framework for the medical devices market throughout the European Union – to set high standards of quality and safety and to harmonize the principles of implementation medical devices for marketing and use.

The European Union’s Medical Device Regulation will affect your medical products and their Instructions for Use (IFUs).

Apart from monitoring more thoroughly the safety profile of the products placed on the market through implementation of a post-market surveillance (PMS) plan, implementing and maintaining a risk management system throughout the lifecycle of a device is also needed. Companies not following the new rules will no longer be allowed to sell their medical products in the European Union.

An increased demand will be placed on manufacturers labelling and packing requirements through the MDR. According to FDA figures there has been a large increase inproduct recalls in the last decade of which 15 percent can be attributed to labelling errors. There will be requirements for manufacturers to have labels ready for immediate printing, thereby reducing the risk of a mass recall. In addition, companies must provide “instructions for use” (IFUs) that correspond to the format as defined by the EU MDR. The IFUs are available in several languages and require authoritative approval leading to significant effort for its management throughout the registration, production, and distribution process. The proposed procedures will enable the distribution process for appropriate IFU’s, making sure they are available in the correct language and updated as required.

MDR – Article 10 – General obligations of manufacturers states that ‘Manufacturers shall ensure that the device is accompanied by the information set out in Section 23 of Annex I in an official Union language(s) determined by the Member State in which the device is made available to the user or patient.’

The Regulation determines the kind of information that a manufacturer needs to include on a medical device:

  • (a) information allowing the identification of the device, including the device name, serial number, lot number, the UDI, the device model, as well as the name, address and the website of the manufacturer
  • (b) any warnings, precautions or measures to be taken by the patient or a healthcare professional with regard to reciprocal interference with reasonably foreseeable external influences, medical examinations or environmental conditions
  • (c) any information about the expected lifetime of the device and any necessary follow-up
  • (d) any other information to ensure safe use of the device by the patient, including the information in point (u) of Section 23.4 of Annex I. (the overall qualitative and quantitative information on the materials and substances to which patients can be exposed)

Additionally, the Article 18 thereof states that the information shall be stated in the language(s) determined by the concerned Member State. The information shall be written in a way that is readily understood by a lay person and shall be updated where appropriate. Updates of the information shall be made available to the patient via the website.

To see whether your company is ready for the new MDR, and in order to find gaps within a company, it is recommended that you perform a complete gap analysis. You should start with a gap assessment and evaluation of your current situation considering the type of product and define the required step to achieve compliance to MDR 2017/745. The goal of such MDR analysis is to help a Medical Company like Manufacturer, Distributor, Importer, Authorized Representative or Consultants to implement the new Regulation MDR and IVDR in an easier way. Pharma and life science companies will need to conduct a gap analysis from the linguistic point of view also to determine if any of the EU member state languages are missing in the documentation. If so, a strategy to add those missing languages is required in order to distribute product in those countries.

At SeproTec pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, chemistry and healthcare are some of our specialties. We employ the latest technological advances in translation in work processes designed from the ground up to meet the specific needs of life science sector organizations. To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your multilingual projects, reach out to our global team today.

For further information on the new MDR, https://ec.europa.eu/health/md_sector/new_regulations_en

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(c) European Commission. Infography reproduced with permission of the European Commission.

 

 

SeproTec at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting!

marzo 14th, 2019 | Posted by admin in conferences | events | Life Sciences | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

Sharing views and expertise with industry leaders, meeting 6,000+ life sciences professionals, networking… This is what awaits SeproTec Team at DIA 2019 Global Annual Meeting in San Diego, June 23-27. We will be exhibiting at booth #621.

This meeting is a must-attend for all life science professionals around the globe. Stay tuned for more info!

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: October 2018

noviembre 16th, 2018 | Posted by admin in Blog | SeproTec | Traducción | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We announce the thirteenth winner of our Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Piotr Tomsia and we would like to invite you to read a short interview with him.

Piotr, what do you start your work day with?

I am an avid fan of daily routines, so I always try to start my days off in a similar fashion. Almost every day I get up at 6 AM. Next, I make some coffee (and I’m an even bigger fan of coffee) and sit down with my laptop. I spend the next 30 to 45 minutes reading. It’s not purely for informative reasons. It also helps me get in rhythm for the day. After about an hour I start proofreading translations from the day before. This way, I get to do some work before the usual 9 AM deadlines and find time for sports (mostly basketball!) and other activities in the afternoon.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation?

I believe I first started considering a career in translation in high school. However back then I mostly wanted to work with languages in any kind of manner. It was only a couple of years later, at university, that I realized translation and interpreting were the two things that I enjoyed the most. After graduating I started an internship, which convinced me that this was the right thing to do. It also helped to have some of the nicest and brightest people I have ever met as my teachers.

 If you could speak any foreign language, which would it be and why?

My wife always tells me I have a knack for Italian. I do love this country and its culture (food isn’t bad either, right?) so there must be something in it. It would also be nice to speak Mandarin and see what that part of the world is up to. Or maybe Japanese? It’s very hard to pick just one but I would ultimately go with Italian. It would greatly help with exploring the country’s culinary secrets J

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

This particular question is easier because the thing that I enjoy the most is also the thing that I am most impressed with. It’s the work culture. SeproTec is like a well-oiled machine. Every person in the company that I interact with is very professional and goes above and beyond to make everything clear, provide help and answer every single question. It makes my work a lot less complicated!

 In your opinion, which are the most important challenges in the translation industry nowadays?

In my view, the most important challenge that the translation industry (or maybe the translators themselves) faces is the pace of work and ever-tighter deadlines. Clients often require very quick services. It may pose a problem since everyone has to work on several projects at the same time. This in turn requires greater efficiency and organizational skills, and not everyone is up for the challenge.

 

Thank you Piotr, dzięki! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie and thank you for your cooperation!

We have a pleasure to announce the twelfth winner of our Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Gareth Harding and we would like to invite you to read a short interview with him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gareth, what do you start your work day with?

As I work from home and don’t have to travel to work, I start my working day reading the news on my computer while eating breakfast.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation? 

I decided I wanted to work as a translator after I moved to Spain with my wife and family and found teaching English was not for me.

If you hadn’t become a translator, then what do you think you would have done? 

Prior to working as a translator I was an environmental consultant for many years in London. It was very interesting work, every project was different and I was using my science background to solve problems and also learning about engineering and finance.

If you could speak any foreign language, which would it be and why? 

I guess it would be Chinese or really any language with a totally different structure from the Latin-based languages. This would give an interesting insight into a different way of looking at and thinking about the world.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec? 

The variety of the work and being able to use my scientific background and knowledge.

Human Translation vs Machine Translation – what do you think? 

Machine Translation is improving all the time and is now excellent, but I think humans will always be needed to edit the output from machine translation.

 

Thank you, Gareth. We really enjoy working with you! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie :)

We are proud to inform that we have extended our bronze sponsorship for Translators without Borders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TwB know that #LanguageMatters and we know that #WordsMatter.

TWB has recently responded to the European refugee crisis, the Caribbean hurricanes, and the Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh, among others. As one of the most critical issues TwB are dealing with is the Rohingya refugee crisis, we strongly encourage you to read the ‘Report from the Field‘ by Andrew Bredenkamp, Chairman of Translators without Borders Board of Directors.

‘Access to information in a language someone can understand is a human right, above all in humanitarian crises. Communicating in the right language helps people feel empowered, dignified and safe.’

We are proud to be part of this effort.

Happy International Translation Day 2018!

septiembre 30th, 2018 | Posted by admin in SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

30. September has been celebrated worldwide as International Translation Day since 1991, when it was established by the IFT (International Federation of Translators). At SeproTec, we know that the role of translators and interpreters in the globalized world is essential and we celebrate this day in recognition of our translators and interpreters around the world. We know that without their hard work, we would not succeed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a big Thank you! for all your hard work and efforts!

SeproTec Translator of the Month: August 2018

septiembre 27th, 2018 | Posted by admin in International | SeproTec | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

Let us announce the eleventh winner of the Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

In this ocassion we would like you to meet Virginia Santos, our translator and a real polyglot! Have a cup of tea and take a moment to read this very interesting interview!

 

What do you start your work day with?

Unless I have an urgent project that must be finished or is due that same day, my working day starts with, I must admit, a certain amount of laziness and self-reproach: “I am getting up far too late again! This is because I went to bed too late once more! I’m hopeless… and it took me one hour to eat breakfast!” … Then I start to approach the work with caution: I turn on the computer, and I look for some song, some information that I’m interested in… until it comes to a point where I tell myself “enough of this idleness!!!” And at that point I start to work with full focus, to the point where I can spend many hours translating without realizing it.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation?

Actually…never. I have always been, as far as I can remember, very excited about languages, and was heading in that direction in a natural way, without giving it much thought . In addition to that, this job fitted in perfectly with my lifestyle: it allowed me not only to work with languages all the time, but also to travel abroad with scholarships to continue studying them and to attend courses on many other subjects with freedom of schedules… Every day I thank Heaven for all the good things that this job brings me.

Virginia, you translate into Spanish from Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, English, German, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Slovak and Ukrainian. How did you become so interested (and proficient) in all these languages?

It’s impossible to answer this question in a few lines…

My interest for languages goes back to the time when, under circumstances which would take me too long to explain,  suddenly something “clicked” inside of me and I understood that languages are like mathematics (which I loved): absolutely logical, perfect, everything they are and happens to them has a reason for being and needs to happen; and that, each language, in its own way, is beautiful, they are all beautiful , insurmountable, boundless. They are like doors to the infinite, perfect and complete forms of seeing and interpreting the world…This wonder of the phenomenon (I would almost say “miracle”) of language and of each language in particular, has reaffirmed and strengthened itself with each new language I have studied, including the Slavic languages.

In the case of the Slavic languages, what fascinates me particularly about them is the etymology of the words: the concepts are very clear and very structured. There is so much order and logic in them that I have been able to encompass with relative ease, not only the whole Slavic branch, but through them I have come to better understand Latin (the construction of which is very clean, perfect, very similar to that of the Slavic languages) and as a consequence I have been acquiring a deeper understanding of Castilian, which is my own language. That is, thanks to the Slavic languages I have come to understand myself better and I have realized how my mother tongue reflects my own construction of the world.

The Slavic world also fascinates me because of the enormous richness of realities that it embraces: several continents, many and very diverse climates, numerous geographical regions (north, south, east, west), diverse religions, very different political systems, even various alphabets… It is a grandiose world. At a more personal level, I owe very much to this Slavic world: specifically to many flesh and bone Slavic people and to many experiences lived in those countries that have shaped me and are an intimate part of me.

And as far as proficiency… it is relatively simple. If you love what you do because it makes your life richer every day and if you add to that a personality (my own) that is perfectionist by nature (for better or for worse) and a dedication of time and effort which is almost unreasonable… it is inevitable to acquire proficiency!

If you hadn’t become a translator, then what do you think you would have done?

I wouldn’t know what to answer. There are many jobs that I like and that I am very strongly attracted to, but the truth is that I have found them because of my job as a translator. Translation takes me into many worlds and allows me, as well, to continuously study new things about other subjects that I am interested in.

Concurrently with my job, I have been trained in foot reflexology, pedagogy, body theology and many other things, with which I would like to work. When I now think about professions I like, I think that I would very much like to work as a childhood teacher or with babies, as a language teacher at university or as a foot reflexologist; and, of course I intend to keep on studying because there are many other topics that I am interested in and that I would like to investigate.

There is another job which I hold sacred and that I respect more than any other and it is the job of the home-maker. The real home-maker, the one who “makes a home”, who creates the warmth and the excellence in the quotidian “small big things”. I dream of that job because I believe that if more intelligent women dedicated themselves to the task, this work alone, would restore, in today´s world, the humanity and the warmth that it so direly needs.

What do you most enjoy about working with SeproTec?

Many things. In the first place, the people of the team are wonderful. It is super pleasant to work with them; they take into account my circumstances, and they try to adapt the conditions of the project at hand to fit my needs. In the second place, there is a consistency in our collaboration and in the genre of projects, that allows me to work with a lot of systematicity and order. In the third place, I can see that SeproTec is a very serious and responsible company in administrative and tax matters, etc. And last, but not least, I am especially fond of SeproTec because it was the first company to offer me the opportunity to work as a translator at the moment when I had just obtained my degree and had yet a lot to learn. That opportunity meant a lot to me in many areas of my life, it opened many doors and ways, and it is something for which I am exceedingly grateful.

What do you think are the greatest challenges for the translation industry nowadays?

If the challenge is for the translation industry, then the challenge for any industry is always to be more efficient, to make more money… On the other hand, if the challenge is for translation, as a human activity, or for the translators as its architects, I would say that the challenges we face are several:

1. To be able to take advantage of computer-assisted translation tools without dehumanising ourselves, without acting like machines, without killing the language, impoverishing it with clichés and subjecting it to a deadly and vulgar globalization. We must take advantage of all the benefits of technical advances, without falling into mechanicism. We should be able to save the soul of the language: it would not help us to look for greater efficiency and profit, if we were to lose the nuances and subtleties that only a sensitive an educated human being can grasp.

2. To understand that knowledge or competence do not necessarily go hand in hand with degrees or formal qualifications. The obsession for qualification certificates and degrees and the fear of “professional intrusion” impoverish the world, in my opinion, and may be the enemies of things well done. It is undeniable that in the field of translation there are many competent translators that may be initially trained as doctors or engineers etc. It would be absurd to close the doors to them. It is also be the case that university careers in Spain do note even cover all the existing demands of translation. Do we have, for example, schools that train translators from Turkish, Wolof or Quechua? And, nevertheless, the translations from those languages may be needed. I think that reality should govern over formal qualifications, and that the work should be done by whoever does it well, independently of the degrees that that person has or doesn´t have. Socrates did not need to have a degree in Philosophy from the University of Athens to be founder of Philosophy itself… In a world that searches for truth, it is the individual who creates the qualification, and not the other way around.

3. Everybody who speaks, but especially linguists and translators have the responsibility of looking after the language, nowadays exposed to a type of violence to suit specific ideologies and an attempt to manipulate it into a mediocre version of itself; and this is, I believe, happening everywhere. This responsibility compels us to act firmly to maintain its logic, its clarity, its rigour and its Beauty, even when that implies our effective opposition to the clumsy, toxic and chaotic innovations of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language.

Thank you so much, Virginia! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie :)

 

As part of its goal of supporting and integrating the most innovative initiatives within its sector, SeproTec has shown its support for the LocWorld organisation by agreeing to be a corporate bag sponsor of its 2018 events in Europe and the States.

The autumn event will be held at the Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle from 17 till 19 October 2018 and SeproTec will be exhibiting at booth #215.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our sponsoring of LocWorld Seattle 2018 confirms our Company’s commitment to all those initiatives which favour the growth and development of the sector and contribute to promoting and defending innovation and good practise in all of its activities.

We can’t wait!