How to optimize and reduce costs in patent translation

septiembre 28th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Traducción | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translating patents is often a real challenge. To understand why, it is first of all necessary to understand what a patent is: it is the bundle of rights that allows us to register a new technological process or product in a country. Most national patent offices require that your application be filed in the official national language or, if it is a regional office such as the EPO or WIPO, you can choose between local languages (e.g. English, French or German). The stakes are such that we do not even need to explain how important it is that the translation of the patent is carried out properly and by a professional expert both in the technological field related to the patent and in the patent filing process.

What must be considered in order to reduce patent translation costs?

Intellectual property (IP) translation is a necessary process when we want to extend the exploitation rights over a product, process or technology to other countries. When trading with foreign companies, this translation also plays an important role, as it does if you want to manufacture in another country: this document will protect you against possible legislative problems.

The correct wording of a patent, especially the patent claims, defines what the patent does and the scope of what you want to protect, if, that is, the competent authority agrees to approve your patent application. The claims are the part of the patent that is reviewed by the courts in the event of a patent infringement allegation, which is why patent registration offices carefully examine each claim before granting a patent.

The importance of optimizing or reducing a patent translation

The importance of patent translation optimization lies in the need for all the documentation provided to be correct, while reducing waiting times. Optimization is, therefore, a key element insofar as time and final cost are considered. And a poor translation can increase one as much as the other, on the basis that patent registration often takes a year or more. The role of a professional agency, such as SeproTec, is also important in this respect.

Why outsource to a professional agency?

If mistakes are made, the translation of a patent can be ineffective, as it becomes completely obscure. It is common for registrations to be rejected because an application has not been properly completed. Which is why a professional patent translation agency always starts from an understanding of the invention to be registered. This is the first step required for making the wording in the translation as clear as possible, with the exact and appropriate words being used combined with a thorough check of each term.

The role of a professional agency can, therefore, be honed down to three basic aspects.

  1. The first is to clarify the substance of the document, which is both legal and, at the same time, highly technical.  Given the importance of terminology in the patent translation process, at SeproTec we only handle these projects with approved translators who are experts in the technical field related to the invention.  Furthermore, we possess the highest quality certifications, ISO 9001 and ISO 17100, to ensure the quality of the final result.
  2. On the other hand, the text must be natural, but respecting all the content of the original, avoiding, under all circumstances, ambiguity and providing total clarity.
  3. By outsourcing the patent translation process to a professional language service, rather than relying on a third party provider, you will ensure effective communication, coordination, consistency and quality assurance at every step of the patent translation process.

 

In addition, the cost of translation can represent up to 60% of the total validation cost and up to 20% of the total lifetime cost of a patent. SeproTec works with skilled professional resources and effective CAT- and AI-based tools to increase efficiency and reduce costs while ensuring quality. The latter include translation memory tools and glossaries that are used to identify repetitive text, thereby reducing time and costs during the patent translation process.

Using a professional language provider who also has extensive experience in patent translation pays off from the word go. The risk of submitting cheap poor quality translations when filing an international patent completely cancels out the potential savings made from using a non-professional provider.

If you want to know more, contact us on this link.

 

 

When a professional translation is ordered for a website or other medium that has been designed for a specific language, it is typical for problems to arise when fitting the new text into the allotted space. In each language a different number of words may be needed to express the same idea. That is why ideas that we want to convey in French or Arabic usually take up more space than in English or Chinese.

Expansion and contraction of texts

This effect is known to translation professionals, and is called expansion or contraction depending on whether more or less space is taken up. For example, when translating a text from English into French, we know that the translation will expand by about 15% compared to its original version.

Although it is very hard for the translation and the original to end up with exactly the same number of words, the effect can be more noticeable depending on the language of the target readers. Generally speaking, Romance languages use more words and Germanic languages use fewer to convey the same concept.

How do contraction and expansion affect design?

Currently, we live in a highly visual world, in which the text on websites, social media, catalogs and brochures are designed to create a sensation and capture people’s attention within seconds. As result, when we have a very noticeable expansion or contraction phenomenon, the end-product may lose its efficacy and adjustments may be needed to conserve the original emotional impact.

At SeproTec we work with localization experts who help our clients to achieve a balance between translation and design. Their work ensures that the original communication goal is preserved, but they may use more appropriate cultural formulas, considering not only the concepts, but also the feelings they engender or the use of a vocabulary that is more familiar to the target readers.

Thanks to their work we are able to guarantee that the product that the end-client receives is true to the original, not just in terms of content, but also intent and appearance. A very graphic example of this are translations into Arabic: images and text boxes are ordered inversely so that they make sense in relation to the direction in which the text is read.

Other factors to bear in mind

In addition to the unpredictability of the amount of characters in a translation, additional factors, such as compound nouns or character width complicate the management and layout of the text.

Languages like Finnish, Dutch and German represent what in other languages would be a sequence of smaller words as a single long word.

For example, the Spanish phrase “Seguro de Responsabilidad civil de automóviles” becomes “Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung” in German. Although in Spanish that phrase can be adjusted to fit two lines, in German it cannot be automatically adjusted, which can present a layout challenge.

Regarding character width, for example, “plans” in English becomes “しょくぶつ” in Japanese, occupying much more horizontal space.

How does the work done by localizers affect prices?

Most of the language combinations are priced based on word count in the source text (the original text).  Nevertheless, there are times when pricing is based on the word count in the target language.  Since the variation in word count for a given translation cannot be known beforehand, generally conversion ratios are used depending on the project languages. These are established based on the average increase or decrease of the terms.

The final cost of a project will also depend on other factors, such as the subject and the modifications made by the localizer or layout team.  These are usually estimated in work hours. Nevertheless, it will always be faster and more economic to use our specialists than to hire a separate graphic designer for each language to which a document needs to be translated. Our in-house layout teams ensure that your designs are appropriately adapted, taking expansion and contraction into account.

In conclusion, we can say without a doubt that a good professional translation service will always give clients the results they’re looking for. It isn’t just about quality texts, but also good adaptations of the end-product.

 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: May 2021

julio 7th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We announce the May winner of our Translator of the Month action at SeproTec!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

On this occasion we would like you to meet Julio Amago a well-known translator of this house for the last 15 years and we invite you to read a brief interview with him.

 SeproTec Translator of the Month_May 2021

You have been working with us 15 years now! That is a lot, you are such a veteran. What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

I’m not sure how I feel about being called a veteran. Sometimes it seems like I’m still just starting out, and I keep studying and learning every day—about translation, about running a business and about my different subject matters.

What I enjoy the most about working with SeproTec is the varied nature of the jobs I get through the agency.

You work with many different languages: Catalan, English, French, Portuguese and Spanish. That is impressive! Is there any language you can’t handle?

There are many languages I can’t handle. To start with, all those languages you mentioned are concentrated around Southern Europe, and that’s only a small corner of our big world.

I lived in South Korea for two years as an English teacher and I really wanted to learn the language, but it proved to be extremely difficult. There were no courses for foreigners in the small city I was living in, so I studied with some books I bought and was always taking notes in a little notebook I carried everywhere. I tried really hard and I could get along with basic needs and conversation, but nothing like the way I can communicate in French and Portuguese, for example, which share so much with Spanish and even English.

This was twenty years ago now, so although I still remember the basics and many of the names of the terrific Korean dishes I have lost most of the vocabulary and grammar that I learned with so much effort.

You were an English teacher before working as a translator. That is awesome! When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in translation?

While travelling you always find yourself translating, trying to decode a menu or to find your way in an underground system, and that got me thinking about what it would be like to do it professionally. When I got back to Spain after my time in Korea, while I was working as a teacher of business English, I found a job offer in a company specialising in pharmaceutical and patent translation and I thought that with my background in biology that would suit me just fine. They loved the test I did for them and that’s how I got started as a full-time translator. The switch to freelancing came later.

Although you specialise in medical translation, as a multifaceted translator yourself, you might have other fields of interest. Is there any other field you enjoy working with?

I enjoy many fields, especially those that are technical and science-related, and I would love to work with extreme sports since I enjoy rock climbing and paragliding in my spare time, but I haven’t yet looked into doing it professionally.

You are also passionate about traveling! Is working remotely while traveling easy? What is your next destination?

I always work remotely, even when I’m at home, so that’s not really the challenge. The challenge depends on your destination and mode of travel, since you are totally dependent on the internet for work. So it’s easy if you just rent a nice Airbnb with a super-fast connection for a weekend or longer, but it’s nearly impossible if you are roughing it.

I was travelling overland in Mexico a few years back and at times I had to reject jobs or ask not to be sent jobs with urgent deadlines if I was moving between different places, because I could not guarantee whether I would have a good connection or not until I got to my destination. I remember one time when there were problems with the connection and I was late with a job with an important deadline. Both the PM and I were tearing our hair out! That was very stressful so I try to be more careful now about translating on the road. It’s also nice to take a break every now and then!

I’m not sure about what my next destination will be. I would like to start by going back to the UK after almost 8 years away from Europe, but for now I’ll just keep enjoying the little corner of the Pyrenees that I’ve been calling home for the last 10 months.

 

Thank you so much, Julio.  Have a great summer ahead!

 

Any translation process requires a review stage that guarantees optimal quality. This need is much more prominent, however, in the case of pharmaceutical or medical translation, due to some of the factors that come into play.

Medical translation: much more than translating

It is easy to understand that any activity related to the medical or health field requires special attention and care. This is field of vital importance: in it, a job well done can be a vital part of treating a patient and, on the flipside, a job poorly done could have fatal results. Translation within this field is no different.

Most medical texts go through a full translation process, since the results and advances of the numerous research initiatives around the world must be made available to all professionals on the planet. That is why we need specialized linguists who know first-hand how these texts work and the specificities of the different languages in which they will be working and who, in turn, have specific knowledge about the subject in question.

 

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

Quality translations for a crucial sector

As in any translation process, texts have to go through various stages in order to provide an optimal final result. Not all translation providers are created equal, but, assuming you have opted for an ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified corporate translation provider, you can expect your translation to be put together by at least three different people in the translation, editing and proofreading pipeline.

The quality control process, a whole, well-synchronized team

First, a specialized translator, selected for their experience as an expert in the field, with experience translating languages for native-speaker readers, will be in charge of reading the entire text, investigating any ambiguities, and transmitting all the information to the target language.

After that, a different linguist has to review the initial translation, correcting and improving any errors or slips that the translator may have left in. The proofreader adds further expertise in the subject matter and native language to the translation project, thus performing Linguistic Quality Assurance (LQA) to ensure that the translation is clear, correct, and concise.

After the translator and proofreader have completed their assignments and the translation has gone through Language Quality Assurance (LQA), the project usually goes to the layout team. Multilingual DTP experts eliminate any difficulties arising from expanding or retracting text, or character differences from the original language to the target language translation.

Lastly, a different proofreader will produce a final version. In the process of reviewing the general appearance, style and design of the project, it is also detected if something is missing or if there is an error, in which case the Project Manager (PM) is notified and forwards the text to the appropriate person to correct the problem.

When a document is submitted for translation, there is a whole team involved with the final product, which is thoroughly reviewed and researched before being finalized. Beyond the translator, reviewer, and proofreader, you have a project manager and may include a multilingual layout team working to deliver the final translation. Content can thus be analyzed more exhaustively, guaranteeing quality translations.The final quality of the text that we deliver to the client must be the highest possible, of course, due to the potential consequences that an error in this kind of text can cause. Take, for example, the case of a patient receiving an incorrect dose of a drug due to a failure to properly transcribe a medical package insert. Even more serious cases can occur, such as errors of meaning when transcribing the way to proceed during a surgical intervention, aggravating the patient’s symptoms.

For this reason, pharmaceutical and medical translation is one of the translation fields that requires the most attention. Health depends on a correct understanding and transfer of information between specialists into the most different languages, and each medical specialty has a plethora of highly specific terms. In these cases, it is essential that the translator have certain knowledge on the specific subject matter and be capable of resolving errors or technical problems. A good team of experienced linguists, such as that of SeproTec, will guarantee the highest quality in texts of this kind.

 

 

 

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

marzo 16th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translation is an activity that applies to all fields of knowledge, to facilitate its dissemination and understanding by everyone. One of the fields in which we cannot do without translation is science, as it enables the exchange of information between researchers from different countries. For this reason, we will now analyze scientific translation and highlight its importance in the academic field.

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

What does scientific translation involve?

We should start with a general review of this specialty. Scientific translation, as its name suggests, aims to adapt research texts for readers who speak another language. Among these kinds of texts, we find the following.

  • - Scientific journal articles.
  • - Monographs.
  • - Theses.
  • - Conferences.
  • - Informative documents.

And what about technical translation? Generally, there is no consensus on what is considered technical translation. Several authors opt for a very broad meaning, extending it cover to all texts with specific terminology. Others are more specific, defining it as the translation of engineering texts or instruction manuals.

How important is it within science?

Science is defined, in very general terms, as an ordered system of structured knowledge. Of course, it is essential that such knowledge be disseminated throughout the scientific community so that it can be applied, expanded, and truly effective. This is where translation comes in, facilitating the understanding of texts and adapting them for the work of other researchers.

Today, English is considered the lingua franca in science. Therefore, all articles and research papers include an abstract, or summary, in English. This, however, has not always been the case: informative texts used to be written in French, German or Russian a century ago… And even in Latin, if we go back just a little bit further in time.

The scientific translator, an indispensable figure

The question of whether the specialized translator should be drawn from the scientific community seems increasingly clear. As with other disciplines, such as legal translation, here a slight error can seriously harm the recipient’s work. This shows the enormous responsibility of the scientific translator. To better illustrate their work, let’s review their main tasks.

  • - Documenting: they need to be familiar with repositories, magazines and other parallel sources.
  • - Understandable: it is essential that the text, its syntax and its terminology be understood.
  • - Situational: not only do ideas need to be conveyed, but also the expressions, which need to be adapted, as well as the terminology of the field in question.

Paradoxically, the main challenge for this type of professional is not related to science itself, but to their own translation activity. Internationally, university education is focused on direct translation into the mother tongue, but in the labor market, and even more so in this case, reverse translation is prioritized.

In summary, scientific translation is a fairly complex discipline. So much so that it requires different training than the other specialties of this discipline. It is also a fundamental process for the advancement of science and for the collaboration and growth of the scientific community.

 

 

Important Alert for Translators

julio 10th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month | Translators | Translators without Borders - (Comentarios desactivados)

We have recently discovered that some freelance translators have received fraudulent translation offers in the name of SeproTec from accounts external to our company.

We ask that all freelance translators make sure that the offers they are receiving come from a reliable SeproTec source, and always from one of our corporate email addresses.

If you are in any way unsure, please contact vm@seprotec.com.

SeproTec Translator of the Month: April 2020

junio 17th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Chatting with... | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of April 2020 edition of our  Translator of the Month action. 

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Berthold Kynast, one of our most regular and trusted German-language patent translators. 

 __________________

Hi Berthold,

What do you start your workday with?

Usually reading the bible, a prayer to God for success in my work, my power drink for good brain performance and concentration, a light breakfast with self-made yoghurt and fruits.

What do you enjoy the most about working as a translator?

That by doing my translation work I can always read about the most interesting new technology while being paid for this.

You are one of our most regular and trusted patent translators. How did you become interested in this specific field of the industry?

I am coming from a family of inventors myself, especially my grandfather, and from childhood I was very much into inventing technical things myself, constructing them, using them, and my first and only employment was in the patent department of a world company as a translator for translating the patents into English for the US-patent office, correspondence to the different patent offices and patent attorneys in the different countries, and competent employee for setting up the patent files from scratch with the inventors in the company. There I learnt how to write patents myself, and I set up and filed some of my inventions myself in the German patent office.

Being a freelancer, how have you been balancing work and personal life especially now during confinement?

In fact as I am working from home anyway with my Bulgarian wife, there was not changing much, only with the confinement the order volume in the first time strongly decreased and also the deadlines were becoming much shorter, most orders were quite small, and the large size orders almost disappeared since Corona, to this day (I hope this will change again). Indeed, only from Seprotec are coming orders regularly, but Seprotec is the best anyway! ❤️

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?

This is clearly the case; it was for me until I got to work for Seprotec. Before, the rates were so low and the costs of living so high that I had to shift from Germany to Bulgaria (for what I am very thankful now because I am so happy here) in order to be able to live a normal life with what I was earning. Many agencies literally kind of abuse the freelancers by loading work on them which has nothing to do with the translation, which they are not even able to do professionally, but with time consuming layout work, which is decreasing the rate further. Seprotec is the first agency ever where I see a perfect professional approach to the translation field and the translators, which is also reflected in the rate and the payment delay, as well as in the contact with the Project Managers. The first time as a translator I feel valued and estimated. And this I try to give back to Seprotec with each order also in future.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

To use personal contacts to find orders from direct customers and to join a professional translators association, this was where I was contacted from Seprotec through their database. At first, I would recommend visiting events like the SDL roadshows or other exhibitions where translation agencies are present, but to take utmost care about the conditions under which has to be done the work, and the payment as well as payment delays. Also every agency has the own preferred CAT tool, so that a beginner translator has not to buy instantly new software, I would recommend to ask the agency if they have possibility to give a free license for use of the software at least in the beginning, or if they have group arrangements for buying software at a cheaper price.

 

Thank you so much, Berthold!  It has been a pleasure to chat with you, thank you for your kind words about SeproTec and our team and enjoy your SeproHoodie!

SeproTec Translator of the Month: March 2020

junio 4th, 2020 | Posted by admin in SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of March 2020 edition of our Translator of the Month action

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Katarzyna Tomaszewska, one of our most trusted German into Polish translators.

Hi Katarzyna! Let’s start :) Being a freelancer, how do you balance work and personal life?

It’s not easy, especially having a little child. However, I’ve managed to divide household chores with my husband fairly and now I believe we’re doing pretty good.

What do you start your work day with?

I usually start my day with a cup of coffee and proofreading projects that are due that morning. Only after do I think about my breakfast.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

I’ve dreamt about it ever since I was a University student. After I graduated, I got an internship in a renowned translation agency, and this is how my adventure with professional translation began.

What is your favourite book and what are you currently reading?

I don’t have one favourite book since I just love reading. Right now I’m reading “The Narrow Road to the Deep North” by Richard Flanagan.

Besides work, what other things do you do to keep yourself occupied during confinement?

To be honest, the pandemic didn’t affect my life that much – I’ve always worked from home, and in my free time I read books or go for a walk in the woods with my family.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

It’s good to read a lot to be proficient in our native language.

 Thank you so much for your time, Katarzyna, and for the great cooperation!

Enjoy your SeproHoodie :)

Medical translations are possibly some of the most complicated kinds of translations to do. Here we’ve reviewed the requirements a translator must meet to take them on with all the keys to success.

What is a medical translation?

They are usually texts such as scientific articles, drug package inserts and clinical reports, or other content related to medicine or the pharmaceutical industry. It seems logical to surmise that translating them would require specific training on the topic and absolute accuracy.

What requirements must a medical document translator meet?

Requirements on education and experience: medical translators should have a recognized graduate qualification in translation or in any other field from an institution of higher education plus a minimum of two years of full-time professional experience in translating; native level in target language and a fluency level in the source language. Medical translators must be fully aware of cultural sensitivity issues, for example, some medical terms for diseases have a direct translation in the second language, while other terms have been adopted from English language.

It is the translator’s responsibility to maintain the patient’s privacy when doing their job. Its essential to ensure patient-physician confidentiality.

A professional medical translator must keep him/herself up to date  with the latest improvements and advances that have been made in the medicine industry and in medical technology.

Aside from a fluent level of the source language, experts in this kind of professional translation should understand that

· Their work must be highly rigorous, since the result directly affects the health of the readers. In fact, as a prerequisite the translator must be an expert in the pharmaceutical industry and scientific terminology.

· It is more than likely that the translator will need to do clinical research to find out what the exact translations of the terms are.

· This is a technical translation: synonyms, paraphrasing, and different wordings cannot be used. Either a known medical term or one that can be explained with footnotes must be chosen.

· Medical language is characterized by its direct and objective style. Every word counts, and the end text must have an expository clarity that makes it easy to understand.

· When terminology is used it should be clarified and justified in a footnote so readers will be able to easily understand it.

· Haste makes waste. Medical translations should be done with enough time to do a good job. New versions of previous texts should be translated from scratch so as not to repeat previous poor translations.

Why is doing a good medical translation so hard?

Because in any other field there are always references in the target language to check. Translating an article about a scientific discovery or about a new drug means the translator is on their own; they almost have to do some of the same research the author of the text did.

If you find yourself in this situation as a translator, keep the tips above in mind. If you need to purchase this kind of translation, choose an agency that offers pharmaceutical translation services to ensure the best result possible.

We hope we’ve given you a basic idea of what medical translations entail. Only the very best translators, like the ones at SeproTec, feel confident enough to take on these kinds of assignments because of their unquestionable complexity and the consequences of not doing a perfect job. Pharmaceutical companies, clinical research organizations (CROs), medical and surgical devices manufacturers and biotech companies rely on us for translation of their most sensitive documents and our strict quality control on the translated content. SeproTec delivers consistently clear, accurate translation of high-value information and our clients may be 100% sure they can depend on us.

To learn more about how SeproTec can help you with your projects, reach out to our global team today.

The words that save lives

marzo 23rd, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | International | Interpretación | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Literally several days ago we woke up in a new reality. The world seems to have stopped. Most of us have been more or less affected by COVID-19. Sometimes it’s about businesses, sometimes the situation is more serious: it’s about our family members.

The language industry will play a vital role in communications in this time of crisis, and communication is the key nowadays to advance the knowledge on this global issue.

Words that Save Lives_SeproTec_COVID19

Today we are particularly proud of our translators and interpreters – often on-site, in crisis places, in hospitals, at police precincts, courthouses, social aid centers and clinics.

You are our everyday #heroes!

Just keep in mind that every word the industry translates or interprets on COVID-19 helps saving lives.

#proudtobepartoftheindustry