At SeproTec, we are always with you

marzo 17th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Sin categoría - (Comentarios desactivados)

#StayAtHome

In relation to the global Coronavirus-COVID 19 epidemic, we would like to inform you that SeproTec Multilingual Solutions will continue to provide top-quality services to its customers, having adopted all necessary measures to ensure that we can continue to operate normally and safely while safeguarding the health of our employees, customers and collaborators at all times.

We are fully equipped for remote work, so a large part of the SeproTec office and management staff will #StayAtHome, but still be as engaged as ever.

We also have safety protocols in place to ensure uninterrupted service for our customers with the same data protection conditions as before.

Allow us to take this opportunity to publicly express our gratitude and support to all of the professionals who are working hard and on-site these days to make our stay at home better, and, in particular, to our public service interpreters from all around the world now in the trenches to help out at police precincts, courthouses, social aid centers and clinics.

We remain at your service through our normal telephone numbers and email addresses and our open hours continue to be 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m, Monday to Friday.

It is our hope that this situation will be resolved as soon and as quickly as possible, and we are confident that, together, we can do it.

Warm regards,

 

Juan Julián León

CEO

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: February 2020!

marzo 17th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Interviews | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of February 2020 edition of our Translator of the Month action

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Matthew Schlecht, one of our most trusted patent translators, translating from: Japanese, German, French and Spanish into English, with an extensive knowledge and experience in the research field.

Hi Matthew, thank you for finding some time to answer our questions :) Let’s start!

What do you start your work day with?

Upon waking, I scan my email inbox to see if any critical overnight emergencies have developed. Then, I usually start out with a two-mile vigorous early morning walk unless the weather is terrible. After the walk, I settle down with a big mug of coffee and process the merely important incoming overnight email before starting the day’s work.

Do you have a fixed schedule for work, or do you usually finish your day when your work allows you to?

I work through the morning until midday and then stop for lunch. If the schedule is tight, I get right back to work, but on a normal day I take some time to do errands and chores, and work in the garden in season, to clear my head. Then I get back to work. If I can finish up the day’s schedule by early evening I’ll stop then. If not, I continue until I finish up whatever work must go out by the next morning.

It is often said that translation is an underrated job. Do you think that people understand and value this profession or are there any misconceptions?

Although some end clients have an appreciation for the value that a translator can add, I think that many have little idea of what is involved in the translation process, or over how great a range quality can vary, and they consider translation to be a commodity. These latter clients seem to believe that high quality is still available even when budgets are driven down. Most agency project managers have a much better appreciation of how the translation process should work properly, but they too frequently have an uphill battle conveying this appreciation to the end clients.

What do you think are the greatest challenges of the translation industry nowadays?

I can summarize the challenges in terms of two drivers: faster turnaround and downwards pressures on rates. The two together are incompatible with the expectation of a professional-grade, quality translation product. Machine translation is addressing these challenges to an extent, while at the same time defining a new role for the translator as the “final out” person, the one who ensures that all aspects of the product (the translation) are of suitable and deliverable quality.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

First, foremost, and always the project managers! They understand the translation process, and appreciate how to collaborate productively with their translators and editors. They take most of the heat from the end clients, while still treating their translators and editors with respect. The projects are also quite interesting, and the PMs realize the importance of a good fit between the translator/editor and subject matter.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

One tip would be to focus on one or a few areas of expertise, and not to adopt the generalist or factotum translator model, which I believe has a poor future. Another is to become comfortable with machine translation, because it is not going away. There are few subject matter areas and language pairs where MT isn’t making major inroads, and those few will diminish as time goes on. One more, and perhaps the most important, is to develop good relationships with your PMs; to deal with them honestly, professionally, and with respect. This sort of investment will always pay dividends, whether in your current dealings or at some future date when you get a referral or are brought along when a PM changes positions. Become the “go to” person in your areas of expertise and language pairs, maintain high quality, and you will rarely want for work.

Thank you so much, Matthew! It’s a great honour to have you among the team of our translators. And… enjoy your SeproHoodie!

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: January 2020!

febrero 25th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | SeproTec | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of January 2020 edition of our Translator of the Month action

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Antonio Teixeira, one of our most trusted English and Spanish into Portuguese translators!

Hi Antonio! Let’s start! Being a freelancer, how do you balance work and personal life?

I have quite a defined routine: I go to the gym from 7am to 8am and after that I make a coffee and work from home from 9am to 6pm. But I am always available on the phone for any emergency translations! After 6pm I go out with friends, go for a walk or go to the cinema. I always come home early! A normal work-life balance, basically!

What do you think are the greatest challenges of the translation industry nowadays?

The relationship between new language Technologies (LTs) and machine translation on the one hand and maintaining the quality of the final product on the other. The implications for pricing are another story!

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

I have been working as a translator for over 20 years; I’m old school! I have loved words since I learned to read.

What is your favourite book and what are you currently reading?

My favourite book is “Rayuela” by Julio Cortázar, and now I’m reading “La siliconización del mundo. La irresistible expansión del liberalismo digital” by Éric Sadin.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

I would advise them to read, to distinguish between knowledge and information and, obviously, to be up to date with the new tools.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

Professionalism and seriousness, but mostly friendliness and good vibes.

Thank you, Antonio! We really enjoy working with you!

SeproTec_Diploma Translator of the Month_January 2020

 

 

 

 

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: December 2019!

febrero 5th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of December 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

Translators’ work is of vital importance in every translation company. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Anna Sałek, one of our most German and English into Polish translators!

Hi, Anna!

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

During my internship in the Polish Ministry of Justice I was asked to prepare a written translation into Polish for then pre-accession advisor. Surprisingly, the results were quite satisfactory and I realized that I’m genuinely enjoying this!

What do you start your work day with?

My typical day starts with checking e-mails, news of dailies and social media updates (the latter is an advantage of being a freelancer :)

If there is no hurry I try to run my errands before the rush begins. Everything depends on my commitments.

Do you have a fixed schedule for work, or do you usually finish your day when your work allows you?

I don’t have a fixed schedule (which at times has a negative influence on my personal life) but respecting deadlines is my top priority.

Do you have a life motto?

No pain no gain, no risk no fun :)

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

Interesting projects, well organized workflows and extremely helpful project managers.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

Trust yourself, be patient and do not rely on Machine Translation because it makes your mind lazy.

Thank you for your time, Anna, and congratulations! It’s a great pleasure to work with you. And enjoy your Sepro hoodie :)

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We are pleased to continue with our series of interviews with SeproTec experts. This time we talk with our Head of Interpreting Department, Isabel Arroyo—so let’s go!

Isabel has been working in the company for almost 12 years and she heads the Public Services Interpreting Department.

- Hi Isabel! Thanks for booking time for us in your busy calendar – we know the last few months have really been busy for you! We would like to get to know you better, so let’s get started! Can you tell us how everything started?

12 years ago, I was hired as a manager when we began the interpreting services project for the National Police. It was the first time that this client had put the management of these services out to tender, and it was pretty chaotic. Back then, many of us entered the Department at the same time and, even though there was a lot of work, we had a great time. We learned an enormous amount. Slowly but surely, we began adding new clients and the Department started to take shape. In 2010, I was appointed coordinator, and since 2012, I’ve been the manager. I’m a Sepro veteran now!

- Did you always know you wanted to work in the industry?

To be honest, this job came up as soon as I finished my degree. Even though I specialized in translation and had always had teaching in mind, when I saw this job offer, I thought it was really attractive. Working in the translation and interpreting sector was always my first choice.

- Can you tell us what your role involves, how it fits into the wider language service industry?

Our job is not a common one in the labor market. Interpreting for the public services is relatively limited, but I have to say we handle some very different kinds of tasks. In my case, I have duties of all kinds, covering the supervision of all tasks concerning the Public Service Interpreting area, including preparing, reviewing, and approving price quotes and reports, supervising the databases, managing the team and the services, organizing training courses, contacting and visiting clients, presenting proposals and following up on quality plans, participating in the preparation of bids, etc. However, this project would not work without the great administrative team behind it, currently more than 40 people (coordinators, account executives, selection specialists and clerks) in the various offices (Las Rozas, Barcelona and Valencia). Every day we have to face a wide variety of challenges. I think that the fact that the team is so diverse (different nationalities, ages, educational backgrounds, etc.) makes it more complete. We learn a lot from one another because everyone contributes something to the service. To complete our tasks, we work closely with other departments such as Human Resources, Administration and Marketing & Sales. It is also very gratifying to know that all our work has a social impact, and that we work with and for people and are often able to come up with solutions for really complex situations.

- What is the most challenging aspect of your job?

The most challenging part of our job is making this sector more professional and making people acknowledge the value provided by interpreters. There is still a lot to do to get there. The first step is to raise awareness among the public institutions of how important it is. We also need to work on qualifications and improve the levels of service in general.

- SeproTec is a leader in translation and interpreting for public services. How is this different from providing services for non-public/ non-institutional clients?

From my standpoint, besides the obvious differences in the way people are hired, salaries and the types of services, one of the key aspects that makes our management different is the immediacy. Our team is operational 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and, generally, we have a two-hour margin from when the request is made to when the interpreter arrives at the site. Also, the range of languages is very wide, and we are obliged to provide a service in any of the official languages and dialects from practically anywhere. Among our latest requests have been languages such as Malayalam, Tibetan, Ilokano and Baluchi. It’s quite a challenge! I always say that our interpreters are true all-rounders because they have to cope with very different situations on a daily basis and do not always have information about the people they are going to assist. For example, often they don’t send us any information on the type of crime or documentation on the cases and so our interpreters might find themselves assisting anyone from a person arrested for petty theft to the parties involved in a complex tax evasion case in the courts.

As a general rule, the main method used is liaison or bilateral interpreting. However, some clients understand the role of the interpreter better than others, so they are not always helpful as regards timing and pauses or just in general. Maybe the ideal solution would be to provide all these services by way of simultaneous interpreting, but in practice this isn’t easy given the budgetary limitations to install technical equipment at every site and the number of professionals available in this discipline.

I feel strongly that much work remains to be done to raise awareness in the public services about the role of the interpreter.

- Do you agree that today’s society can be defined by multiculturalism and multilingualism?

It’s clear that migratory flows are having a very significant influence on the social context and therefore on our work. While, say, 12 years ago, there were a large number of requests for Eastern European languages, over the last few years, the war in Syria and the huge influx of people arriving on the coasts of Southern Europe in small boats have changed the situation. Also, yes, I believe that today’s society is more open to multiculturalism and multilingualism, and that there is a growing number of tools for communicating with people from anywhere in the world, but I also have to say that professionals are still needed to facilitate legal proceedings, as there are still cultural barriers that reduce the effectiveness of communication.

- Now and then we see some articles complaining about the externalization of this service to LSPs, mainly due to a lack of knowledge of their services. Will you please help us understand the difficulties of the service?

Although interpreters who pursue a public service career in many countries are still virtually unknown (sometimes interpreting is barely differentiated from translation), are not covered by specific industry regulations, and often aren’t taken into sufficient consideration, fortunately people are becoming more aware of the problems that this creates and the industry is working to change this situation. To start with, we need to remember that the Translation and Interpreting track at university is relatively new. The profession, however, has always existed. The logical tendency is for this field to become a true profession, and it is inevitable that during that process there will be all kinds of experiences.

For some years now, the Public Administration has been opting to outsource part of the Translation and Interpreting service. There are interpreters in place directly hired by the Administrations. However, because there are very few of them for the huge volume of work, and, therefore, few language combinations are available, and especially because there has been a rise in the number of requests for minority languages, the private sector is increasingly being used to cover the real demand for translation and interpreting services and the specific challenges each situation presents.

During our years of experience in the business, we have found employees in the industry who had never worked legally before joining us. Our interpreters comply with the confidentiality regulations and are hired in accordance with the labor legislation in force in the country or region where the service is performed, so their salaries can vary from one zone to another.

While this is always something that private enterprise has been criticized for, their rates reflect the maximum prices set by the Administrations in their tenders and, unfortunately, the economic situation has not been very favorable over the past few years. People also have a rather mistaken idea of how much the company earns. Many people take the maximum bid price as their point of reference, but you have to remember that a bid must be made and the price must include both the interpreting and the management of the service: the gross salary of the interpreter, Social Security, severance packages, vacations, administrative management, service 24 hours a day/365 days a year, selecting interpreters, travel and per diem costs, management tools, and other general expenses. In short, the profit margin is not nearly as large as it might appear at first glance.

Taking Spain as an example, SeproTec currently works with a monthly average of 1,000 interpreters who provide around 550 interpreting services daily for the courts and police. Approximately 350 of them have a permanent contract and, of these, 230 have a full-time contract.

Regarding our positive experience as interpreting service providers for the Public Administration, we can say that the volume of complaints or incidents reported is minimal compared with the volume of services rendered (less than 0.08% in 2018).

We are committed to defending and respecting our profession, collaborating with the Public Administration in a continuous process of renewal and a search for solutions that fit the needs as they arise. That is why it is crucial for private companies, associations, and the academic and professional fields to work together to strengthen and secure the future of public service interpreting.

- What languages are being demanded? We bet it must be a wide range…

So far this year we have received requests for about 120 different languages.

In the case of Spain for example, the languages most in demand have not changed much over the years: Arabic (33%), English (10%), and Romanian (10%), followed by French, Mandarin Chinese, Georgian, Russian, Urdu, Albanian and German (accounting for 28% between them). This year, for example, there has (fortunately!) only been one request for each of the following languages: Twi, Bissa, Chechnyan, Dyula, Gujarati, Ilokano, Kasonke, Oromo and K’iche’.

- Are we right in imagining that it’s a fast-paced work environment in which one day is never the same as another?

Indeed, one of the major characteristics of this job is that it is impossible to predict with any certainty what we are going to face each day. The only exception is at night when you watch the news or tune into the radio on the way to work in the morning and hear that a criminal group has been arrested, there has been a raid, or several boats have arrived… Then you know exactly what to expect! In general, winter is usually quieter than summer, but it all depends on who our clients are at that moment and on the Department’s specific situation.

- Do you have any amusing anecdotes to share with us?

Lots. I think we could write a book. Apart from some of the interpreters having strange names (as you can imagine, with so many different nationalities), often you don’t know if you’re going to come across a man or a woman on the other end of the phone. For example, when I was starting out, I had to call a person whose name was Issa. I was certain that it would be a woman, but when I met Issa in person, it turned out that he was a man who towered over me.

Civil servants can also create some really unlikely situations, and at times they have asked us for “hands-free” interpreters when they meant to say sign language interpreters, while at other times they don’t know how to specify the language and they ask us for interpreters of Belgian, Nigerian or Shi’ite… They get quite confused!

- And lastly… Imagine one day without: work, internet or phone calls… What would you do for this one day?

I think I’d prefer not to imagine it… It would be chaos!

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The custom of sending Christmas cards is very popular in many countries. Every year we send many Christmas cards to our loved ones wishing them a ‘Very Merry Christmas’. However, have you ever wondered how it all began?

The Christmas card originated in the UK in 1843 by Sir Henry Cole who struggled with an extraordinary problem—he simply had too many friends! Writing a letter to each one with Christmas wishes took him too much time so he came up with an amazing idea. He ordered a drawing with a ‘Merry Christmas!’ inscription, replicated it a hundred times in a printing house and finally sent the result to his friends. The drawing showed a whole family proposing a festive toast.

As time has gone by, the design of Christmas cards has changed. Nowadays, cards have all sorts of pictures on them, for example, winter pictures, Santa Claus, a Christmas tree or even photographs of the senders themselves.

This Christmas at SeproTec we want to come back to the tradition of writing Christmas cards. Why? It’s because we think it’s a very unique way to show someone how much they mean to us. That’s why we are giving you an amazing opportunity to send a Christmas card to someone special in your life—someone you love, someone you miss, someone you think about a lot. For each card we will make a 0.50 USD donation to Translators without Borders.

SeproTec_send a Christmas card to someone special

Thanks to you, this Christmas time will be more joyful!

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: October 2019

diciembre 10th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the October winner of the 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

Translators’ work is of vital importance in every translation company. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Gaëlle Bordet, one of our most trusted Catalan/ Spanish into French translators!

SeproTec Translator of the Month_October 2019

Gaëlle, when did you realize you wanted to pursue a translation career?

After a year as an Erasmus student in the Pompeu Fabra University, in Barcelona, I realized first that I didn’t want to leave Spain and then that Spanish, Catalan and English were my real passion. I needed to keep using on an everyday basis my languages and find a job that combined my passion and would be opened to the world. It was then an obvious choice for me to follow the translation and interpretation path.

What do you start your work day with?

Usually, I start my day with a huge cup of coffee, it’s like a peaceful moment before things get more interesting and busy. Then I start my computer and I can easily lose track of time translating. Hours fly very quickly when I am in front of my screen!

Do you have a fixed schedule for work, or do you usually finish your day when your work allows you?

Actually, I don’t really have a fixed schedule. In fact, I have two little girls and I found a balance between my job as a Mum and my job as a translator. I manage to adapt my schedule to be with them when they need me. However, if there is a lot of work to do (and usually there is!), for me, work must be done and I spent as much time as needed until it’s completely and satisfactory done. For me, respecting the deadlines is very important and if I must spend the night working, it doesn’t bother me.

Do you have a life motto?

I try every day to be thankful for every good thing that happens to me and my family. I think it’s very important to enjoy and appreciate every moment. My family is the most important thing in my life and they really are my driving force.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

I love my work with SeproTec. At the beginning, I didn’t want to do juridical translations: I actually thought it was quite boring! However, I wanted to gain experience in every translation filed and I started with SeproTec through a university friend who was working at the Barcelona agency. But little by little I started to appreciate more and more my job. Every project is a new world and a new story. It’s been my everyday life for 14 years now and I hope it will keep on this way.

What advice would you give to beginner translators?

I think it would be that they will have to work hard and try a lot of translation field until they find their own one. There is a lot of hard competition in translation, nevertheless they must not give away their work and if they work with constancy and are reliable, I think their clients will recognise and respect it.

 

Merci, Gaëlle! It’s a real pleasure to have you in the Team! And ejnoy your Sepro hoodie – it will for sure keep you warm as the temperature in December drops!

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: September 2019

noviembre 27th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

We have a pleasure to announce the September winner of the 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals.

We would like to introduce you to Yolanda Carati, one of our most trusted English/ Spanish into Dutch translators!

SeproTec Translator of the Month for September 2019

Hi, Yolanda! Let us ask you a couple of questions :)

What do you start your work day with?

Due to the time difference (I live in Mexico) I usually wake up early to check my mail. I accept possible assignments and get up to make breakfast and go for a walk with my dogs. If there’s nothing urgent I usually start around nine.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue translation career?

I studied Spanish in the nineties, followed by a two-year translation course at a private institution. After I had finished this, I wrote like 30 applications to translation agencies with zero response. In those days the internet was in its first stages and pages like Proz didn’t exist. So I started to do other jobs, always with in the back of my mind that I would return to translation once I was ‘old’. After over 25 years in office jobs and a move to Mexico, I decided it was time to try. I started with small translations while I was still working, and soon had enough work to quit my job and make a living as a translator. And I’m loving it!

If you wouldn´t have become a translator, then what would you do?

I did a lot of jobs, mainly in the administrative field. I worked as a project coordinator in a solidarity fund, I was executive assistant to the director of the Mexican branch of a US company and worked 10 years as deputy head for internal affairs in the Netherlands Embassy in Mexico. But if I really have to choose, I would love to be a dog trainer.

What do you enjoy about working with SeproTec?

The PM’s are great. They’re always patient, give good instructions and are well organised. And believe me, that’s not always the case with other agencies. I work mainly for one client, get interesting projects with reasonable deadline and last but not least, payment is always on time.

What do you think are the greatest challenges of the translation industry nowadays?

One of the biggest challenges is off course all the developments in machine translation. Though machine translations are getting better and better, I don’t think this will lead to the complete disappearance of the translator. But I do think that the work might become more tedious and boring. You can’t put much creativity in editing a machine translation unless you pay it with your own time, and that doesn’t pay the bills. Another challenge is the increasing number of huge translation companies, which sometimes seem to prefer profits over quality at the expense of their translators.

What is your favourite book?

That’s a difficult one… I read a lot, mainly detectives or Dutch literature. But I would say that one of my favourites is ‘Travesuras de la niña mala’ by Mario Vargas Llosa.

Thank you so much, Yolanda, for taking the time to answer our questions.  We are so happy to cooperate with you! And enjoy your SeproTec hoodie! :)

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SeproTec celebrating International Project Management Day!

noviembre 7th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Did you know...? | PM | SeproTec from the inside - (Comentarios desactivados)

Superheroes in real life: SeproTec’s project managers!

PM Day 2019 at SeproTec

We won’t talk about what you all know already—who the translation project managers are and what they do. We know their role is to coordinate the translation process, from the first customer inquiry to delivery of the final files—no matter how the situation develops, the client must get a properly completed translation! In the meantime, this is all about the 50 other small tasks. Easy peasy? We just want to mention a few characteristics that our project managers possess and without which—well—things could look quite a bit different! Making hard decisions, taking responsibility and thinking outside the box are essential to being a successful project manager.

According to the Project Management Institute: “Project management is the application of knowledge, skills, and techniques to execute projects effectively and efficiently. It’s a strategic competency for organizations, enabling them to tie project results to business goals—and thus, better compete in their markets.”

In other words…

It’s about being perfectly organized and keeping track of all the projects happening at their different stages.

It’s about having a deep knowledge and a big picture view of each project.

It’s about supporting both the client and the translator—which means project managers should be diplomats too! Without effective communication with both parties, the project manager could not possibly predict the risks and find solutions to the various challenges that may arise along the way.

It’s about being client service-oriented—it’s also about relationship building: earning a client’s trust and ensuring that the client always has a single point of contact, being detail-minded (terminology and style guidelines!), possessing excellent verbal and written communication skills in multiple languages—well that goes without saying—and being deadline-driven and proactive.

At SeproTec, project managers are familiar with both the translation and proofreading processes as well as quality standards. They can—at any moment—redistribute a task, agree on something with the client, or find a way out of an extraordinary situation.

This is how the project managers are our everyday superheroes!

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SeproTec Translator of the Month: August 2019

noviembre 5th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interviews | Translator of the Month | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Let us announce August winner of the 2019 edition of our Translator of the Month action!

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

We would like to introduce you to Daniel Olkowicz, one of our most trusted English/ German – Polish translators.

SeproTec Translator of the Month_August 2019

Hi, Daniel. What would be your best advice for a student who has just begun to work as a freelance linguist?

Fulfil all the expectations of your clients who are assigning jobs to you. Work smart and be patient even if the results may not be satisfactory at the very beginning. Keep consistently high level of your services and the results will come.

Which are the fields of expertise that you most enjoy translating?

IT, machinery, sports

Working more than 8 hours and even on the weekends in front of a computer may bring serious damages to our health. Have you adopted some specific healthy habits to put in practice during your working hours or after work?

I usually make a brief break every 60 minutes. I just walk around my working space or do some stretching especially for arms and upper body. After work I play football or volleyball every 2nd day.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

Very nice project managers I usually am dealing with and very clear and organized way of working.

Do you have a life motto?

Quality matters more than quantity

Thank you so much, Daniel, for taking the time to answer our questions.  It’s been a pleasure! And enjoy your SeproTec hoodie!

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