Our world has recently become a world of online presence. In the pandemic times we mainly work remotely. As an industry that relies upon travel and thrives on face-to-face interactions, we are truly aware that the recent coronavirus outbreak is a pressing concern for many professionals: those who work in event management, those who used to travel the world to take part in the board meetings and meet different stakeholders, those who take part in panel discussions, to name just a few.

Indeed, in light of the virus’ rapid spread, many events and meetings across the globe have been cancelled or postponed to help minimise the risk of contamination.

How do you create connections when you aren’t face-to-face…?

What if those events and meetings could be hosted, managed and delivered remotely and in any language?

Well wonder no more: companies with multilingual meetings are trying to find a way to push them online and they are actually successful: it is entirely possible and the technology exists – we all use video communication tools such as Skype or Hangouts every day. But many have limitations on time, the number of users or interface control and they lack an important element for multilingual events: an interpreter.

Remote Simultaneous Interpreting (RSI) is known to be revolutionizing the world of interpreting. It is to be considered the best solution for simultaneous interpretation at conferences and web meetings in which several foreign languages are spoken.

The benefits of a remote interpreting service are clear:

- It’s designed for situations where speakers, delegates and interpreters cannot travel

- There’s no need for infrastructure, costly monthly subscriptions or expensive software license – just click on the link or download an app and you’re ready to go

- It can support any number of speakers, interpreters and languages

- It allows sharing of presentations and chat among users

- It’s flexible and scalable – events can be arranged at short notice, sometimes within a few hours!

Remote Simultaneous Interpreting_SeproTec

SeproTec’s Remote Interpreting Platform covers all bases, as it is in essence a remote event conferencing software which includes consecutive or simultaneous interpretation, enabling conversations supporting any number of users and languages.

 

 

The words that save lives

marzo 23rd, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | International | Interpretación | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Literally several days ago we woke up in a new reality. The world seems to have stopped. Most of us have been more or less affected by COVID-19. Sometimes it’s about businesses, sometimes the situation is more serious: it’s about our family members.

The language industry will play a vital role in communications in this time of crisis, and communication is the key nowadays to advance the knowledge on this global issue.

Words that Save Lives_SeproTec_COVID19

Today we are particularly proud of our translators and interpreters – often on-site, in crisis places, in hospitals, at police precincts, courthouses, social aid centers and clinics.

You are our everyday #heroes!

Just keep in mind that every word the industry translates or interprets on COVID-19 helps saving lives.

#proudtobepartoftheindustry

 

We are pleased to continue with our series of interviews with SeproTec experts. This time we talk with our Head of Interpreting Department, Isabel Arroyo—so let’s go!

Isabel has been working in the company for almost 12 years and she heads the Public Services Interpreting Department.

- Hi Isabel! Thanks for booking time for us in your busy calendar – we know the last few months have really been busy for you! We would like to get to know you better, so let’s get started! Can you tell us how everything started?

12 years ago, I was hired as a manager when we began the interpreting services project for the National Police. It was the first time that this client had put the management of these services out to tender, and it was pretty chaotic. Back then, many of us entered the Department at the same time and, even though there was a lot of work, we had a great time. We learned an enormous amount. Slowly but surely, we began adding new clients and the Department started to take shape. In 2010, I was appointed coordinator, and since 2012, I’ve been the manager. I’m a Sepro veteran now!

- Did you always know you wanted to work in the industry?

To be honest, this job came up as soon as I finished my degree. Even though I specialized in translation and had always had teaching in mind, when I saw this job offer, I thought it was really attractive. Working in the translation and interpreting sector was always my first choice.

- Can you tell us what your role involves, how it fits into the wider language service industry?

Our job is not a common one in the labor market. Interpreting for the public services is relatively limited, but I have to say we handle some very different kinds of tasks. In my case, I have duties of all kinds, covering the supervision of all tasks concerning the Public Service Interpreting area, including preparing, reviewing, and approving price quotes and reports, supervising the databases, managing the team and the services, organizing training courses, contacting and visiting clients, presenting proposals and following up on quality plans, participating in the preparation of bids, etc. However, this project would not work without the great administrative team behind it, currently more than 40 people (coordinators, account executives, selection specialists and clerks) in the various offices (Las Rozas, Barcelona and Valencia). Every day we have to face a wide variety of challenges. I think that the fact that the team is so diverse (different nationalities, ages, educational backgrounds, etc.) makes it more complete. We learn a lot from one another because everyone contributes something to the service. To complete our tasks, we work closely with other departments such as Human Resources, Administration and Marketing & Sales. It is also very gratifying to know that all our work has a social impact, and that we work with and for people and are often able to come up with solutions for really complex situations.

- What is the most challenging aspect of your job?

The most challenging part of our job is making this sector more professional and making people acknowledge the value provided by interpreters. There is still a lot to do to get there. The first step is to raise awareness among the public institutions of how important it is. We also need to work on qualifications and improve the levels of service in general.

- SeproTec is a leader in translation and interpreting for public services. How is this different from providing services for non-public/ non-institutional clients?

From my standpoint, besides the obvious differences in the way people are hired, salaries and the types of services, one of the key aspects that makes our management different is the immediacy. Our team is operational 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and, generally, we have a two-hour margin from when the request is made to when the interpreter arrives at the site. Also, the range of languages is very wide, and we are obliged to provide a service in any of the official languages and dialects from practically anywhere. Among our latest requests have been languages such as Malayalam, Tibetan, Ilokano and Baluchi. It’s quite a challenge! I always say that our interpreters are true all-rounders because they have to cope with very different situations on a daily basis and do not always have information about the people they are going to assist. For example, often they don’t send us any information on the type of crime or documentation on the cases and so our interpreters might find themselves assisting anyone from a person arrested for petty theft to the parties involved in a complex tax evasion case in the courts.

As a general rule, the main method used is liaison or bilateral interpreting. However, some clients understand the role of the interpreter better than others, so they are not always helpful as regards timing and pauses or just in general. Maybe the ideal solution would be to provide all these services by way of simultaneous interpreting, but in practice this isn’t easy given the budgetary limitations to install technical equipment at every site and the number of professionals available in this discipline.

I feel strongly that much work remains to be done to raise awareness in the public services about the role of the interpreter.

- Do you agree that today’s society can be defined by multiculturalism and multilingualism?

It’s clear that migratory flows are having a very significant influence on the social context and therefore on our work. While, say, 12 years ago, there were a large number of requests for Eastern European languages, over the last few years, the war in Syria and the huge influx of people arriving on the coasts of Southern Europe in small boats have changed the situation. Also, yes, I believe that today’s society is more open to multiculturalism and multilingualism, and that there is a growing number of tools for communicating with people from anywhere in the world, but I also have to say that professionals are still needed to facilitate legal proceedings, as there are still cultural barriers that reduce the effectiveness of communication.

- Now and then we see some articles complaining about the externalization of this service to LSPs, mainly due to a lack of knowledge of their services. Will you please help us understand the difficulties of the service?

Although interpreters who pursue a public service career in many countries are still virtually unknown (sometimes interpreting is barely differentiated from translation), are not covered by specific industry regulations, and often aren’t taken into sufficient consideration, fortunately people are becoming more aware of the problems that this creates and the industry is working to change this situation. To start with, we need to remember that the Translation and Interpreting track at university is relatively new. The profession, however, has always existed. The logical tendency is for this field to become a true profession, and it is inevitable that during that process there will be all kinds of experiences.

For some years now, the Public Administration has been opting to outsource part of the Translation and Interpreting service. There are interpreters in place directly hired by the Administrations. However, because there are very few of them for the huge volume of work, and, therefore, few language combinations are available, and especially because there has been a rise in the number of requests for minority languages, the private sector is increasingly being used to cover the real demand for translation and interpreting services and the specific challenges each situation presents.

During our years of experience in the business, we have found employees in the industry who had never worked legally before joining us. Our interpreters comply with the confidentiality regulations and are hired in accordance with the labor legislation in force in the country or region where the service is performed, so their salaries can vary from one zone to another.

While this is always something that private enterprise has been criticized for, their rates reflect the maximum prices set by the Administrations in their tenders and, unfortunately, the economic situation has not been very favorable over the past few years. People also have a rather mistaken idea of how much the company earns. Many people take the maximum bid price as their point of reference, but you have to remember that a bid must be made and the price must include both the interpreting and the management of the service: the gross salary of the interpreter, Social Security, severance packages, vacations, administrative management, service 24 hours a day/365 days a year, selecting interpreters, travel and per diem costs, management tools, and other general expenses. In short, the profit margin is not nearly as large as it might appear at first glance.

Taking Spain as an example, SeproTec currently works with a monthly average of 1,000 interpreters who provide around 550 interpreting services daily for the courts and police. Approximately 350 of them have a permanent contract and, of these, 230 have a full-time contract.

Regarding our positive experience as interpreting service providers for the Public Administration, we can say that the volume of complaints or incidents reported is minimal compared with the volume of services rendered (less than 0.08% in 2018).

We are committed to defending and respecting our profession, collaborating with the Public Administration in a continuous process of renewal and a search for solutions that fit the needs as they arise. That is why it is crucial for private companies, associations, and the academic and professional fields to work together to strengthen and secure the future of public service interpreting.

- What languages are being demanded? We bet it must be a wide range…

So far this year we have received requests for about 120 different languages.

In the case of Spain for example, the languages most in demand have not changed much over the years: Arabic (33%), English (10%), and Romanian (10%), followed by French, Mandarin Chinese, Georgian, Russian, Urdu, Albanian and German (accounting for 28% between them). This year, for example, there has (fortunately!) only been one request for each of the following languages: Twi, Bissa, Chechnyan, Dyula, Gujarati, Ilokano, Kasonke, Oromo and K’iche’.

- Are we right in imagining that it’s a fast-paced work environment in which one day is never the same as another?

Indeed, one of the major characteristics of this job is that it is impossible to predict with any certainty what we are going to face each day. The only exception is at night when you watch the news or tune into the radio on the way to work in the morning and hear that a criminal group has been arrested, there has been a raid, or several boats have arrived… Then you know exactly what to expect! In general, winter is usually quieter than summer, but it all depends on who our clients are at that moment and on the Department’s specific situation.

- Do you have any amusing anecdotes to share with us?

Lots. I think we could write a book. Apart from some of the interpreters having strange names (as you can imagine, with so many different nationalities), often you don’t know if you’re going to come across a man or a woman on the other end of the phone. For example, when I was starting out, I had to call a person whose name was Issa. I was certain that it would be a woman, but when I met Issa in person, it turned out that he was a man who towered over me.

Civil servants can also create some really unlikely situations, and at times they have asked us for “hands-free” interpreters when they meant to say sign language interpreters, while at other times they don’t know how to specify the language and they ask us for interpreters of Belgian, Nigerian or Shi’ite… They get quite confused!

- And lastly… Imagine one day without: work, internet or phone calls… What would you do for this one day?

I think I’d prefer not to imagine it… It would be chaos!

The different modes of interpreting; do you know them all?

septiembre 25th, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | Interpretación - (Comentarios desactivados)

There are different modes of interpreting and, despite the popular belief, not all of them have the same use.  Depending on what it is needed for, interpreting can be done in a number of ways, and not all interpreters can work in all the modes. Curious to learn more? If you have any questions about how they work and when to apply them, be sure to check out our post.

What is simultaneous interpreting (in a booth)

In simultaneous interpreting, the interpreter translates the speaker’s words orally, almost simultaneously. Here, a team of simultaneous interpreters is required, and the assistance of technicians. As a result, this type of interpreting must take place in rooms in which the necessary equipment can be set up (a soundproof booth, special sound equipment, receivers, and microphones).

This type of interpreting delivers the best results due to the quality, immediacy and smoothness of communication. This mode is widely used by international organizations, international congresses and conferences, and at technical meetings with a fairly large audience or meetings requiring interpretation into several languages.

The level of expertise, attention, and concentration of interpreters is very high in this mode and, depending on the duration of the session, the interpreters must work in teams and relieve each other from time to time. Half-day and whole-day sessions have two interpreters per language, while mini conferences lasting up to an hour and a half need only one interpreter.

Type of Interpreting

Which interpreting mode is the right one for you?

Simultaneous interpreting using an infoport

An infoport is a portable, wireless, simultaneous-interpreting station. It consists of a simple kit (carrying case, microphone and headphones) that enables users to go to meetings and move around the venue with no loss of sound quality. It is commonly used for guided tours, plant or factory visits, and meetings with up to 20 participants.

Whispered simultaneous interpreting (chuchotage)

The interpreter stands behind the person or persons (maximum of three participants) who do not speak the working language and simultaneously translates the speaker’s message orally (whispering). He or she then interprets the client’s responses back to the other participants.

This mode is commonly used in short work meetings, where one or two participants do not speak the common working language used in the meeting.

What is consecutive interpreting

There are 2 types of consecutive interpreting: consecutive and liaison or bilateral.

Consecutive interpreting is another well-known interpreting technique. The work method used is different in this case. When using this approach, the speaker pauses from time to time to allow the interpreter to speak.The interpreter is usually located close to the speaker and takes notes on the main ideas being expressed.

When comparing consecutive to simultaneous interpreting, the main disadvantage of this approach is that the listener does not receive the message as directly and must be patient.

Because of its characteristics, this method of interpreting tends to be used for short meetings or in courtrooms. For example, communication during a press conference can add over 80-90 percent to the estimated time due to the pauses needed to translate the message. Technical resources are less important in this case.

Bilateral interpreting, also known as liaison interpreting, is commonly used to overcome language barriers at meetings in both the public and private sector. The interpreter orally translates for each speaker in the two working languages without any need for equipment.  It is one of the most widely used methods for courtroom and police interpreting and for services providing support for immigrants and asylum seekers.

Telephone Interpreting, what it is and when to use it (OPI)

Telephone interpreting is a language support system in which you can get an interpreter immediately over the telephone. It can form part of the on-site interpreting service, using a telephone in hands-free mode, or through a telephone call to our call center.

The main advantage of this kind of interpreting is the immediacy and the cost savings, as the user can contact an interpreter for any of the  language combinations offered, from any part of the world, in under two minutes, with nothing more than a cellphone.

It is the interpreting system most used by emergency response services and public services in hospitals and schools due to the convenience of having an on-demand service with no access fees and no minimum charge, as the user pays only for the duration of the interpretation.  Companies and/or executives that request telephone interpreting usually arrange for the service in advance, and it can even be set up as a conference call with a number of participants.  Generally, telephone interpreting is consecutive.

Video Remote Interpretation (VRI)

This is a professional interpreting service using videoconferencing on a computer, tablet, or smartphone.  This mode is very often used when there is no local interpreter available or when the travel costs for an interpreter are just not feasible, allowing companies to have a truly global reach.

Its advantage over telephone interpreting is the elimination of visual barriers, since the interpreter can see the speaker’s gestures and body language, which helps the clarity when transmitting the message.

This service, which is normally used by small and medium-sized businesses and large corporations, is now becoming popular for public service interpreting. It must be arranged in advance and the technical requirements are simple given its online format.

Sign language

Finally, we would like to comment on another interpreting mode.

Sign language is the language used by people with a hearing disability and those live or associate with them. Sign language has its own grammatical structure and vocabulary, so it is not just a transposition of spoken language but is a language in itself, with its own system.

This type of service tends to be used for conferences and events, social services, schools, training courses, and television programs.

What to look for in an interpreting service

Regardless of the type of interpreting needed in each case, it is important to remember that when choosing an interpreter, the field of specialization is as important as the interpreter’s experience. Interpreters must have excellent public speaking skills and the intellectual ability to immediately translate idioms, colloquialisms, and other specific cultural references so that the receiver can understand them.

SeproTec is committed to excellence and the highest quality in the services it provides and that is why it always has the best professionals in the sector. We currently have a extensive database of interpreters worldwide, classified by language combination, interpreting mode, specialization, and technical expertise. This excellent team plus a strong commitment to innovation and the incorporation of the latest technological advances in the sector allow us to offer a wide range of services in any multilingual situation and has placed us among the 20 largest companies offering interpreting services in the world, according to a study carried out by Nimdzi (The Nimdzi Interpreting Index, 2019).

SeproTec has been awarded vital translation and interpreting services in Europe

abril 22nd, 2019 | Posted by admin in Blog | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

SeproTec Multilingual Solutions has signed three new important translation and interpreting service contracts in Europe, worth some 108 million euros over the next four years.

These contracts, according to company CEO, Juan Julián León, are “a recognition of the quality of the services provided by SeproTec and of its productive capacity and financial robustness, and reflect an important milestone in the company’s growth plan, solidifying its leading position, not just in the translation industry, but also in the international provision of interpreting and cultural mediation services”.

This step forward is part of the international expansion plan that the company has been pursuing since 2004. Today SeproTec is present in eleven countries, “which allows us to offer a global service capable of reaching any point on the planet,” León highlighted.

 

Juan Julián León, SeproTec's CEO

Juan Julián León, SeproTec's CEO

The company has been awarded several projects tendered by the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) for the provision of interpreting and cultural mediation services to promote mutual understanding between migrants and aid services in destination countries. These projects will have a budgetary allocation of over 94.7 million euros over the next four years.  Specifically, SeproTec has been awarded four lots, receiving top ranking in its bids for three of them, worth 54.7 million euros in total, and being ranked number 2 in the remaining one.

SeproTec will mainly be providing these services in the migrant camps run by EASO in Greece, Cyprus, Bulgaria, France, Malta, Portugal and Spain, covering a wide range of languages being demanded, such as Arabic, Pashtun, different varieties of Kurdish, Dari, Amharic, Farsi, Punjabi, Urdu and Tigrinya.

Likewise, SeproTec Multilingual Solutions will be providing interpreting and cultural mediation services in Greece for RIS (Reception and Identification Services), which is an extension of the Greek Government’s Ministry for Migration. This contract was awarded in December of 2018 and has a budgetary allocation of a little more than one million euros over six months.

Lastly, the translation multinational has just signed a contract with Spanish police forces for the provision of written translation services and oral testimony interpreting on police premises in 11 autonomous communities, as well as telephone tapping and recording transcriptions as part of official activities throughout Spanish territory. These contracts are worth an estimated 12.7 million euros for the provision of these services throughout Spain over the next 2 years.

 

For additional information on SeproTec, visit us at seprotec.com, follow us on Linkedin at SeproTec Multilingual Solutions or on twitter @SeproTec, or like us on Facebook at SeproTec.

The role of interpreting services at conferences and meetings

noviembre 22nd, 2017 | Posted by admin in Interpretación | SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

The work of interpreters is increasingly valuable and in ever greater demand. It can be found in many areas of life: from concerts, congresses, exhibitions, and guided tours to the rebroadcast of basketball games in another language, and behind the scenes there is always a professional interpreter to ensure you do not miss one detail of what is happening.

Using the services of an interpreter is much more common than you would imagine. Not only are their services required for conferences attended by a large number of people who do not share a common language, they are even requested for civil marriage ceremonies.

Interpreting Services

Types of meetings and events at which interpreting services tend to be used

There are currently many types of events that make use of interpreting, including the following:

Meetings with a large number of attendees These tend to be large congresses dealing with scientific or technical information, with large audiences, that last several days, and have a varied program. Talks and discussions are organized using all types of communication, usually with a very dense content.

Seminars. These are very technical meetings that focus on one specific topic and in which, even if they have a very simple structure, a wide variety of information can be exchanged in the discussions.

International Organizations Meetings organized by work groups or committees, in which there tends to be a clear but lengthy agenda, normally accompanied by documents or slide presentations. After a short introduction, most of the time is spent on discussion, comments and clarification of the topic in question.

Political debates. These are held in the parliaments of countries or regions with more than one official language, such as the EU headquarters in Brussels. They tend to be characterized by a need to know the political ideology, which has considerable legal and procedural content.

Radio and television: Discussions or interviews broadcast on the TV or radio with the participation of foreign celebrities. Often, these same communications media request interpreting services for complete speeches or fragments of speeches to be used in news programs. The content to be interpreted centers around the opinions of the interviewees.

Negotiations. The number of participants is limited and they should know how far they are prepared to go. Everyone must understand the position of the two sides, there are many figures and a lot of terminology, depending on the area of the negotiations. They can be interrupted by breaks for consultation.

Visits or official events. These tend to be short, formal meetings involving ministers, heads of states, advisers, ambassadors, etc. and participants from other countries. At official meetings, and at some meals, interpreters tend to be requested for the conversations that take place between two participants and, obviously, for the official statements.

Press conferences. In this case, the interpreter acts as a bridge between the journalists who ask the questions and the person answering them. The latter can be a sportsperson, a politician, an artist, etc. Normally, these are high-profile public figures.

Official dinners. At this type of event, all the different modes of interpreting are used: from simultaneous interpreting with technical equipment on occasions, consecutive interpreting for official statements or speeches from the podium, to liaison interpreting between two people at the same table. These events are characterized by their official register, the use of quotations, and even at times a humorous style.

Technical courses. These are meetings at which the flow of information is generally one-directional and very technical, so that it is very important to prepare beforehand.

Public Services. From statements at a police station to interpreting entire trials, civil marriages, to helping patients or the emergency services, such as 911. The content is very varied so it is important for the interpreter to have some knowledge of the law or current legislation, be up-to-date on the terminology used, and have good self-control and not get stressed out.

 

Information is power

When interpreting, whether at a conference or for public services, it is necessary to keep in mind the technical and technological aspects as well as the language-related ones. The more information given to the interpreter, the better the job will be done. What information is useful to an interpreter? In addition to the number of languages and booths, the name of the colleague the booth is to be shared with for simultaneous interpreting and the agenda for the meeting, the following information should be provided:

Format of the meeting in which the interpreter will be involved. Although interpreters are very flexible, if they know the dynamics of the event in advance, they will be able to adapt their communication style to the meeting more easily. This dynamic determines the amount of preparation, the tone, and the register used by the interpreter.

Mode of interpreting. The format of the meeting tends to decide the mode of interpreting that will be used. Each mode has its own difficulties and much of the success of a session lies in choosing the right interpreter for the mode being employed.

Nature of the event. A paper on a medical discovery is not the same as an international sales meeting or a civil marriage ceremony. Each has its own special characteristics and involves different up-front preparation.

Technological aspects to be taken into account. It is a wise decision to introduce the interpreter to the technological aids that will be used. The booth or infoport, the types of microphones available, the videoconferencing software, etc.

Topic to be dealt with and reference material. Choosing the interpreter according to the topic to be dealt with is also important as there are some very technical subjects for which not all professionals are trained. Being prepared is an essential part of the job of interpreting. A copy of the presentations, reference material from the speakers; all this information is useful. With it, the interpreter can document and review the terminology needed for the project.

 

The best professional interpreters

A knowledge of general culture, the ability to concentrate, resistance to stress, and mental agility are some of the abilities of good interpreters, as well as an excellent knowledge of their working languages.

At SeproTec we have the best professionals, so that your meeting can be a success. We guarantee the professionalism and flexibility of the work done. With our exceptional track record in the translation and interpreting sector, and a daily average of 450 interpreting sessions, we offer high-quality work in a wide variety of languages, as well as the utmost reliability and service to our clients.

 

SeproTec maintains its leading position in the Translation and Interpreting industry

julio 18th, 2016 | Posted by admin in SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

The prestigious independent consulting firm Common Sense Advisory has once again prepared its annual ranking of the most important companies in the world in the translation and interpreting industry, with the participation of more than 1,000 companies from across the globe. With over 150 million words translated last year, an average of 350 daily interpreting sessions, and over 900 clients around the world, SeproTec Multilingual Solutions has consolidated its position as one of the leading companies in the industry.
The multinational translation and interpreting company, headquartered in Spain, has undergone dramatic growth in recent years. Some months ago, SeproTec announced the opening of a new production center in Austin, Texas, an initiative that forms part of its plan for international expansion. The goal, according to Juan Julián León, the company’s CEO, is to “consolidate a key strategic market and increase the company’s production capacity with the large contracts signed in the USA in recent years.”
This is not the only news, as a few weeks ago SeproTec announced its acquisition of lidolang specialist translations, which León calls “one of Eastern Europe’s leading localization companies, with the greatest growth potential.” In addition to improving the company’s production capacity, this purchase will also broaden its synergies due to the vertical integration of its production processes; its geographical coverage, which makes it possible to offer a more localized service all over the continent; its portfolio of languages; and its expansion into the strategic international markets in which lidolang is already well positioned.
Since the publication of the latest ranking, SeproTec has maintained its position in spite of strong investment in international expansion, which has allowed SeproTec to compete in a larger number of markets with the level of quality that has always distinguished the company.
For León, “This is recognition for the work and effort of all our team and a sign that our commitment to internationalization is allowing us to grow in the large international markets. Our challenge now is to continue growing in order to become closer to our clients and expand our portfolio of multilingual solutions.”
SeproTec Multilingual Solutions is a company with over 25 years of experience in the industry, and has developed a wide range of services that help different companies and institutions carry out their international communication without having to worry about language-related issues. It operates in 14 countries and has over 400 employees.

SeproTec, GOLD sponsor of the 19th Purchasing Professionals Congress.

mayo 11th, 2016 | Posted by admin in SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

The work of the purchasing department has become a key factor in improving a company’s bottom line. If a company aspires to excellence, its purchases must reflect this by matching its real needs. For this reason, and with the commitment of helping the different purchasing department professionals understand the advantages of a global service that covers all the multilingual needs of a company (translation, interpreting, localization, etc.), SeproTec is sponsoring the 19th Purchasing Professionals Congress, which will be held at the Teatro Goya in Madrid on May 25 and 26.

The company’s stand will showcase the most innovative services in the translation and interpreting industry, such as software and website localization, multi-language digital content management, plus other services designed to help companies become truly international.

This event has become the leading discussion and networking forum for professionals in this field. Executives from large corporations, purchasing managers from small and medium-sized businesses, and other professionals with links to purchasing, will pass on their experience on the latest topics of interest to all purchasers, so that the attendees can take back to their organizations new innovative, value-creating models and tools.

SeproTec’s sponsorship of the 19th Purchasing Professionals Congress is further evidence of the company’s commitment to supporting all initiatives that promote the growth of the sector and contribute to the development of a global market.

Old World Language Families

abril 27th, 2016 | Posted by admin in Interpretación | Traducción - (Comentarios desactivados)

CHANGE MANAGEMENT AND ITS PHASES

marzo 15th, 2016 | Posted by admin in SeproTec - (Comentarios desactivados)

It is innate to human nature that all of us should find it difficult to make and accept a change; some more than others, but everyone finds it an effort to make a change.

Society is obliged to adapt to voluntary and involuntary changes, which are either imposed on us or we impose on ourselves to move forward. The success or failure of a change depends on two key factors: time and the different phases. At the end of the last phase, a new change is always started.

Change is a cycle of continuous improvement in which the only stability lies in overcoming its different phases:

Phase 1: Analyze the problem. All changes start with a problem, a crisis or something which is not going well. It doesn’t matter whether this problem is large or small; if something distorts or prevents us from advancing, it has to be changed.

Phase 2: Search for a solution. This may be one of the most creative and worrying phases of the cycle, but it is decisive. Mistakes may be made in finding a solution. In either case, if we make a mistake there is no need to worry; we can always go back to phase 1.

Phase 3: Search for a leader. Alexander the Great, Steve Jobs and Luke Skywalker. They were all brave leaders who drove large changes, even in fiction. However, they didn’t manage this overnight and they also had their failures along the way. But their determination, time and their completion of the different phases helped them reach their goal.

Phase 4: Communicate the vision. Every leader needs a vision; in other words, they need to know where they are going and what they want to achieve. Having a clear idea and knowing what is to be achieved is an essential condition in a leader.

Phase 5: Delegate and motivate. In addition to knowing where they are going, what the goal is and the desired end result, leaders must have strong support behind them to help them carry on come hell or high water.

Phase 6: Lead to victory. Alexander the Great had no easy task and found many obstacles on his way: disease, plagues, technical problems. Anything can happen and undermine our effort. We have to assume that all obstacles are part of the path that we have to follow.

Phase 7: Reward and disseminate. Having achieved our objective, it has to be celebrated and all of those surrounding us must be included in the success because we have all collaborated to achieve it.

Phase 8: Secure the change. Intrinsically, when the change is established we are analyzing both the benefits of the change and opening the doors to new improvements. So a new cycle is beginning which starts at Phase 1: analyzing a new problem and thus maintaining the cycle of continuous improvement.

Therefore, by setting goals, by establishing phases and through determination, the Mediterranean was conquered, the Apple Empire was conceived and the Death Star was destroyed. Let’s not be frightened of change and move forward in harmony to conquer everything we propose.

Production department.