SeproTec Translator of the Month: July 2021

septiembre 20th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

We are more than happy to announce the winner of the July 2021 edition of our Translator of the Month action. 

Translators are the driving force behind every translation company’s success. This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals. 

We would like to introduce Justyna Kwiatkowska, a polyglot and literary translator who has become a “must have” within our team of translators based on her good work. 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: July 2021

You have a Master’s Degree in Swedish Philology, that is awesome! Also, you studied German Literature at Heidelberg University in Germany. Did you know that you wanted to be a translator before taking those paths?

I believe I did. I always enjoyed learning foreign languages and started producing translations already in early high school. I could spend hours trying to figure out how to translate my favorite parts of German or English songs and books. Over time, as I started learning Swedish, my passion for languages and literature continued to grow and I realized I wanted to dedicate myself to translation. The studies I chose equipped me with the tools that made that possible.

As a literary translator yourself, do you consider reading a training to continue to improve your translation skills? Which books did you enjoy the most?

Of course. I read other people’s translations and as well as books in Polish and other languages I speak. It inspires me and furnishes interesting solutions to problems I encounter myself. Right now I’m absolutely fascinated by Marcin Wicha and Therese Bohman.

You are also a plant lover! It is said that having plants around the office greatly improves people’s moods; you probably have plenty of them! As a translator, how do you keep a healthy mindset?

You’re right. I own many plants, my favorite ones are peace lily, pilea, spider plant and fern. Taking care of them or just looking at the green windowsills is very relaxing. But my translation OSH consists also of going to the pool – after all, the spine is one of the most important translation tools.

Do you have a life motto?

“Live long, read lots.”

Have you ever encountered an ethical or moral dilemma on a translation project? How did you handle it?

As a professional translator I deal with all sorts of text in diverse subject areas. When I notice that they differ from my closest-held beliefs, however, I sometimes have to reject them – which rare but can happen!

 

Thanks so much Justyne for your time and good work. We really enjoy working with you! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie.

 

 

 

Any translation process requires a review stage that guarantees optimal quality. This need is much more prominent, however, in the case of pharmaceutical or medical translation, due to some of the factors that come into play.

Medical translation: much more than translating

It is easy to understand that any activity related to the medical or health field requires special attention and care. This is field of vital importance: in it, a job well done can be a vital part of treating a patient and, on the flipside, a job poorly done could have fatal results. Translation within this field is no different.

Most medical texts go through a full translation process, since the results and advances of the numerous research initiatives around the world must be made available to all professionals on the planet. That is why we need specialized linguists who know first-hand how these texts work and the specificities of the different languages in which they will be working and who, in turn, have specific knowledge about the subject in question.

 

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

The final quality assurance process in pharmaceutical and medical translation

Quality translations for a crucial sector

As in any translation process, texts have to go through various stages in order to provide an optimal final result. Not all translation providers are created equal, but, assuming you have opted for an ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified corporate translation provider, you can expect your translation to be put together by at least three different people in the translation, editing and proofreading pipeline.

The quality control process, a whole, well-synchronized team

First, a specialized translator, selected for their experience as an expert in the field, with experience translating languages for native-speaker readers, will be in charge of reading the entire text, investigating any ambiguities, and transmitting all the information to the target language.

After that, a different linguist has to review the initial translation, correcting and improving any errors or slips that the translator may have left in. The proofreader adds further expertise in the subject matter and native language to the translation project, thus performing Linguistic Quality Assurance (LQA) to ensure that the translation is clear, correct, and concise.

After the translator and proofreader have completed their assignments and the translation has gone through Language Quality Assurance (LQA), the project usually goes to the layout team. Multilingual DTP experts eliminate any difficulties arising from expanding or retracting text, or character differences from the original language to the target language translation.

Lastly, a different proofreader will produce a final version. In the process of reviewing the general appearance, style and design of the project, it is also detected if something is missing or if there is an error, in which case the Project Manager (PM) is notified and forwards the text to the appropriate person to correct the problem.

When a document is submitted for translation, there is a whole team involved with the final product, which is thoroughly reviewed and researched before being finalized. Beyond the translator, reviewer, and proofreader, you have a project manager and may include a multilingual layout team working to deliver the final translation. Content can thus be analyzed more exhaustively, guaranteeing quality translations.The final quality of the text that we deliver to the client must be the highest possible, of course, due to the potential consequences that an error in this kind of text can cause. Take, for example, the case of a patient receiving an incorrect dose of a drug due to a failure to properly transcribe a medical package insert. Even more serious cases can occur, such as errors of meaning when transcribing the way to proceed during a surgical intervention, aggravating the patient’s symptoms.

For this reason, pharmaceutical and medical translation is one of the translation fields that requires the most attention. Health depends on a correct understanding and transfer of information between specialists into the most different languages, and each medical specialty has a plethora of highly specific terms. In these cases, it is essential that the translator have certain knowledge on the specific subject matter and be capable of resolving errors or technical problems. A good team of experienced linguists, such as that of SeproTec, will guarantee the highest quality in texts of this kind.

 

 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: February 2021

marzo 22nd, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

Collaborates with SeproTec since 2013 with translations of all kinds of texts, although her specialization is the scientific field.  Holding a bachelor in chemist sciences, Angels Pons, works in Catalan, English and Spanish and has been chosen Translator of the Month in February 2021.

If you want to get to know Angels better, do not miss the short interview below.

Hello Angels, thank you for your time :)

Winner of SeproTec Translator of the Month

 

 

What do you start your workday with?

I start my workday looking briefly my mails and answering the new ones.

Science is your passion and you studied a Bachelor of Chemical Sciences, that is impressive! Do you consider Translation a way to put your passion to work?

With translation I can combine my passion for science and for languages. For me is a pleasure to make science and technique affordable in my own language.

What do you enjoy most about working with SeproTec?

Working with SeproTec is fantastic, because they give me different kind of projects, so everyone is a new challenge. And the translator managers make easy to work with them. They are professional, kind, and helpful.

As an avid reader yourself, do you consider reading a training to continue to improve your translation skills?

Obviously, been an avid reader helps me in my work. I always like to learn new things, and the best way to learn is reading. To be a good and updated professional requires a continuous learning.

You are also passionate about traveling! Is working remotely while traveling easy? What’s your next destination?

Well, when I travel it is for leisure, and then I try not to work and focus in enjoying with my family and friends, but sometimes I must finish some projects and, depending on your destination, it is difficult to get a good internet connection.

This summer, if the sanitary conditions are good, I want to go to spend a week in Ibiza and, perhaps, some days in the Toscana. It is yet to be seen.

 

Thank you so much for your time, thank you for your excellent work and congratulations!

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

marzo 16th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Localización | SeproTec | Traducción | Translators - (Comentarios desactivados)

Translation is an activity that applies to all fields of knowledge, to facilitate its dissemination and understanding by everyone. One of the fields in which we cannot do without translation is science, as it enables the exchange of information between researchers from different countries. For this reason, we will now analyze scientific translation and highlight its importance in the academic field.

Scientific translation, essential for the progress of science

What does scientific translation involve?

We should start with a general review of this specialty. Scientific translation, as its name suggests, aims to adapt research texts for readers who speak another language. Among these kinds of texts, we find the following.

  • - Scientific journal articles.
  • - Monographs.
  • - Theses.
  • - Conferences.
  • - Informative documents.

And what about technical translation? Generally, there is no consensus on what is considered technical translation. Several authors opt for a very broad meaning, extending it cover to all texts with specific terminology. Others are more specific, defining it as the translation of engineering texts or instruction manuals.

How important is it within science?

Science is defined, in very general terms, as an ordered system of structured knowledge. Of course, it is essential that such knowledge be disseminated throughout the scientific community so that it can be applied, expanded, and truly effective. This is where translation comes in, facilitating the understanding of texts and adapting them for the work of other researchers.

Today, English is considered the lingua franca in science. Therefore, all articles and research papers include an abstract, or summary, in English. This, however, has not always been the case: informative texts used to be written in French, German or Russian a century ago… And even in Latin, if we go back just a little bit further in time.

The scientific translator, an indispensable figure

The question of whether the specialized translator should be drawn from the scientific community seems increasingly clear. As with other disciplines, such as legal translation, here a slight error can seriously harm the recipient’s work. This shows the enormous responsibility of the scientific translator. To better illustrate their work, let’s review their main tasks.

  • - Documenting: they need to be familiar with repositories, magazines and other parallel sources.
  • - Understandable: it is essential that the text, its syntax and its terminology be understood.
  • - Situational: not only do ideas need to be conveyed, but also the expressions, which need to be adapted, as well as the terminology of the field in question.

Paradoxically, the main challenge for this type of professional is not related to science itself, but to their own translation activity. Internationally, university education is focused on direct translation into the mother tongue, but in the labor market, and even more so in this case, reverse translation is prioritized.

In summary, scientific translation is a fairly complex discipline. So much so that it requires different training than the other specialties of this discipline. It is also a fundamental process for the advancement of science and for the collaboration and growth of the scientific community.

 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: January 2021

marzo 9th, 2021 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

We have a great pleasure to introduce the January 2021 winner of the Translator of the Month action at SeproTec.

As a way to say Thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success, the initiative has been launched in 2017.

Please meet Jean-Michel Nadeau, our January 2021  Translator of the Month winner and a really versatile translator, who masters patent translations, marketing and IT content and even legal texts.

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month_January 2021

Hi Jean-Michel,

You have a minor in German studies (Germanistics) and the equivalent of a minor in Linguistics from Université de Montréal, that is awesome! When did you know that you wanted to become a translator?

I didn’t choose a translator’s life. It chose me. Before I could even seriously reflect upon a career in translation, I was swomped by work in the field. It took a while, but I learned to love it. I can’t name any other job that allows me to work while on the beach at Santorini in Greece or at home while cooking my vegetable broth.

How do you remember your first year as a Seprotec translator?

It was a pleasant surprise! The boss at the agency where I had started out was looking to get out of the business and contracts had started drying up a bit, so I guess you could say Seprotec contacted me just in the knick of time! Seprotec has been a reliable source of work almost immediately and the fuss was non-existent.

What are the most common translation problems in the language combinations you work with?

English is a language that has no case or gender markers. It is also spectacularly syntactically unclear. For example, if I see the segment “Monitoring cameras” without any context, how do I know if I’m supposed to read it as “Cameras that are used in monitoring” or “Looking at the feed of the camera to monitor whatever it is directed at”?

As for German, well… some texts in German are basically like reading a mathematical formula. That’s generally not a problem, but it can become a bit overwhelming when translating patents, for example.

You are very versatile as a translator! You translate patents, marketing and IT content and even legal texts. What field of specialisation do you enjoy the most? Why?

Although it sure does help to be specialized, it has never been easier to be a generalist thanks to the Internet. Gone are the days when being a translator meant having at home tons of references pertaining to one field. But I will say, as an avid gamer, that translating video games was the most fun I’ve had working.

Is the current situation worldwide affecting your work as a translator? How?

It was a bit rough for the first two months, but with demand exploding for some very online segments of the market right now I’m afraid I’m not going to see vacations for a while. It’s not like I have anywhere to travel to or anything better to do, anyway!

 

Nice to chat with you, Jean-Michel.  Enjoy your well-deserved hoodie!

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: November 2020

diciembre 23rd, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

With over 12 years of working experience with us, the winner of our November edition of the Translator of the Month action, owns extensive experience in interpreting and translation in various fields.

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

 

Hi Chiara,

You studied a Bachelor of Arts, that is awesome! When did you become interested in Translation?

It was just a matter of chance! At that time I was working in a bakery since I had always considered work a way to make a living and also get to pay my Art courses which I was interested the most before starting to work as a translator.

One evening, I was walking through the old town of Valencia when I noticed a job ad looking for interpreters. I decided to call that number phone and then… my life changed.

 

November 2020 Translator of the month

November 2020 Translator of the month

You started working with Seprotec as interpreter in Valencia in 2008. How do you remember that experience?

I loved so much that experience! Actually, I was an interpreter in Courts and also in some police stations of the Region of Valencia. I would like to thank my chief in Valencia at that time, Katy Stachon, a highly professional and fair person, definitely the best chief I’ve ever had; she trusted me and gave me this unbelievable chance to grow both as a person and as a skillful worker. I began to work as a translator thanks to her! Seprotec was looking for an Italian-Spanish interpreter based in Valencia and she proposed me…so here I am! Sometimes I miss learning constantly day by day and helping people communicate better. It was very interesting and shocking at the same time to get to know deeper this social and anthropological substratum of our society.

 

You are a very complete professional! Do you prefer Translation or Interpreting? Why?

Thank you so much!

I really don’t know, it’s such a good question! They are similar but not at all.  I’ve always liked Italian grammar since it has helped me understand the Spanish linguistic mechanism to express myself properly. On one hand, Translation allows me to work from anywhere and at any time and it gives us translators enough time to develop concepts accurately. On the other hand, Interpreting focuses on human connections, especially in criminal courts where it’s really important to manage to transmit foreigners’ feelings and improve their communication when they need it the most.

Therefore, I like both because they complement each other.

 

Being a freelance translator and interpreter and also an Art teacher for many years, how have you balanced both crafts?

I think it’s because all of them are creative jobs. Work is for me a way to achieve my personal fulfilment where translating/interpreting and teaching Art are two sides of the same coin of my own self-realization. I think travelling around the world and living abroad taught to me how to be more open minded. One of the greatest challenges that I had to conquer was figuring out that I needed to believe in myself, and being able to study and work in many different fields at the same time has definitely gave me that confidence.

 

Do you think the translation industry nowadays requires the ability of using a CAT tool?

Well, that’s in fact what I think. It’s for me the only way to increase the speed and accuracy of the translation services.

 

Thanks so much Chiara for your time and good work. We really enjoy working with you! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie and Buon Natale.

 

 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: October 2020

noviembre 17th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

Rebekah Edwards is a relatively new translator at SeproTec but has quickly become and important resource within the life science patent translation area.  Fluently speaking 3 languages, Rebekah is the winner of our October edition of the Translation of the Month  action.

This initiative is our way to way to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

Translator of the Month winner, October 2020

  

What does your dream career as a translator look like? Has it been fulfilled?

I don’t know if I have a clear picture of my dream career. Before I went freelance that was my goal, especially so I could enjoy the freedom and flexibility of being able to work whenever and wherever I wanted. For obvious reasons, this year I haven’t been able to enjoy much of the latter, so I’m not quite living the dream in that respect! Otherwise, I’m very happy with how things are panning out so far.

However, I’m also conscious that there’s always more to learn, whether that’s diving deeper into my specialisms or discovering a new one. I’m also (slowly) learning Dutch, so it would be great to add that as an additional language pair one day!

You studied an MA in Technical and Specialised Translation (medical, legal, construction, EU and journalistic fields), that’s impressive! How important do you think it is for a translator to specialise?

During my MA studies I was exposed to a great variety of texts and technical fields. This taught me more about how to specialise in a specific field. It also taught me a lot about what not to specialise in and why it’s not a good idea to try to do it all.

When content has been produced by a specialist in the field in the source language, I think it’s important that it’s then also translated by someone who knows what they’re talking about in the target language!

Have you ever encountered an ethical or moral dilemma on a translation project? How did you handle it?

Not really… although there are certain areas I prefer not to work in, such as defence and military. In these cases I’ve just been open about this with the client, and they’ve generally been very understanding.

You are one of our most regular and trusted patent translators. How did you become interested in this specific field of the industry?

After I graduated, I worked in-house at a translation agency with a lot of big patent clients, so it was there that I learnt all about them and their specific style. I also had the opportunity to help them develop patent-specific style guides and glossaries, which was a great way to expand my knowledge.
I think a lot of translators find patents a little daunting, and some might say boring… Once you get to know how they work, though, they can be like putting together a puzzle, which is very satisfying.

How do you keep yourself motivated?

I find it hard to stay motivated if I’m bored or not enjoying the texts I’m working on. A variety of different projects is key! So, while I enjoy working on patents, I also like to get stuck into something a little lighter, especially if it’s anything to do with food or drink.
I also find it helpful to remind myself why I love working for myself and that I never have to commute again!

What do you like best about cooperating with SeproTec?

Just how easy it is! All of the project managers are really friendly and excellent at what they do, so I can just focus on actually translating.

 

Thanks so much Rebekah for your time and good work. We really enjoy working with you! Enjoy your SeproTec hoodie 

SeproTec Translator of the Month: September 2020

noviembre 4th, 2020 | Posted by admin in Blog | Translator of the Month - (Comentarios desactivados)

We would like to introduce you to Victoria Pastor de Meer, who is passionate about Law. Victoria has managed to combine her passion with her vocation as a translator and works in 3 languages on a regular basis. Not happy with it, Victoria is always on a continuous training mood, now is the turn for studying Dutch and Romanian.

Victoria is the winner of the September 2020 edition of our Translator of the Month action,  an initiative to say thank you! and recognize the efforts of the industry professionals: translators, the driving force behind every translation company’s success.

Let’s have a chat with Victoria.

 

How would your perfect day start?

A few months ago, the answer to this question would have been very different, but in these difficult times that we are facing, my best day would start reading the headline that the COVID-19 pandemic is finally over and life is back to normal.

 

As a translator, you specialize in the legal field. When did you decide to specialize and why did you choose this particular field?

I decided to specialize in legal translation when I was studying my translation degree at university. I opted for this particular field since Law has always drawn my attention. In fact, some time before starting my translation degree I was considering studying law, although I finally decided to study translation because languages are my true vocation.

 

What is your biggest strength as a translator? And your biggest weakness?

My greatest strength is the dedication I put into my work. When I start translating a text, I like to acquaint myself with the subject to ensure that the final translation has the best possible quality. The number of things that one learns by translating is impressive, both linguistically and culturally.

My biggest weak point is my perfectionism. Many times, I have the feeling that some term or expression may have a better translation, or more suitable for the context, than the one I have chosen. I suppose it is something that happens to many translators. In the end, work experience, good documentation and reliable information resources teach you to make decisions with confidence when translating a text.

 

You work with four different languages, that´s impressive! Which language pair do you enjoy working with the most?

The language pair I like to work with the most is German-Spanish. I studied German as my first language in my degree and it has a special value. I could say that it is the most difficult language combination of all the combinations I translate, due to the challenges it poses in all aspects. However, efforts pay off when I feel the satisfaction of having done a good translation.

 

What kind of training do you do to continue to improve your translation skills?

I try never to stop studying something that is related to translation and languages. I am currently studying Dutch and have also taken up Romanian, which I studied as a D language during my degree and always found it to be a fascinating language. Besides that, I like to read news from the international press in English and German to improve my level in these languages by learning new terminology. I frequently visit translator forums to keep up to date on CAT tools and I like to take online courses related to programs that I use in my day-to-day work, such as Excel or Word.

 

What CAT tools do you prefer working with?

The CAT tool I like to work with the most is SDL Trados. I have worked with this tool since I started studying and I still think that it is the one that offers the most benefits and works the best. I also work with SmartCat, which I think is a very good initiative, but as it is an online tool it is a problem when you don’t have internet access.

 

Thank you so much Victoria for taking the time to answer our questions.   It’s been a pleasure and congratulations!

Danke schön, Victoria! It’s a pleasure to work with you! Hope you’ll enjoy your SeproTec hoodie.